Cujo

Cujo

Outside a peaceful town in central Maine, a monster is waiting. Cujo is a two-hundred-pound Saint Bernard, the best friend Brett Camber has ever had. One day Cujo chases a rabbit into a bolt-hole - a cave inhabited by sick bats. What happens to Cujo, how he becomes a horrifying vortex inexorably drawing in all the people around him makes for one of the most heart-stopping...

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Title:Cujo
Author:Stephen King
Rating:
ISBN:0307348245
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:432 pages

Cujo Reviews

  • Dan
    Aug 20, 2007

    I'm guessing that many of you own or have owned a dog at some point in your life. And, i'm also guessing that you'd consider said dog to be loyal to you and part of your family. So, I ask you, can you possibly imagine what you'd do if your dog went rabid?

    Pooch would lose his appetite. Start to become easily confused. Tired. His brain would melt and with that he'd forget about you. Forget the loyalty and love he held for you.

    He'd feel intense pain.

    In his eyes YOU would become the reason that he f

    I'm guessing that many of you own or have owned a dog at some point in your life. And, i'm also guessing that you'd consider said dog to be loyal to you and part of your family. So, I ask you, can you possibly imagine what you'd do if your dog went rabid?

    Pooch would lose his appetite. Start to become easily confused. Tired. His brain would melt and with that he'd forget about you. Forget the loyalty and love he held for you.

    He'd feel intense pain.

    In his eyes YOU would become the reason that he feels this pain.

    Mix this with a claustrophobic seige over a few days, some marital issues, a child that suffers from sleepless nights and you have Cujo.

    King really doesn't hold back any punches with this. Be warned. It's bleak, but an amazing read.

  • Kandice
    Aug 05, 2008

    This book is terrifying. More so because the important events in the story could all actually happen. They are real possibilities. This story would not work in today’s age of cell phones and constant communication, but for anyone with a memory of the way things used to be, it reads as all too possible. On a personal note, I have always kept a small box of water bottles and snacks in my car since learning to drive because of THIS book.

    Any true King fan knows how he loves to tie his novels togethe

    This book is terrifying. More so because the important events in the story could all actually happen. They are real possibilities. This story would not work in today’s age of cell phones and constant communication, but for anyone with a memory of the way things used to be, it reads as all too possible. On a personal note, I have always kept a small box of water bottles and snacks in my car since learning to drive because of THIS book.

    Any true King fan knows how he loves to tie his novels together with the tenuous threads of shared locales and characters. Cujo makes much use of the Frank Dodd “bad guy” from The Dead Zone, completely skipping Firestarter references. Dodd has become something of a bogeyman used to scare children into behaving and a fear the adults in town would like to forget.

    I love all of King’s work (not equally!) but have always felt his novels that do not contain a supernatural element make the best movies. Cujo was an excellent movie! What’s funny is that there is a very real undercurrent of the supernatural in the book that does not appear in the movie at all. Dodd is that element. The novel hints that the evil in Dodd is still hanging around Castle Rock. I’m spoiling nothing here by saying Cujo has rabies, but there are very definite pointers to that case of rabies also being a manifestation of the evil of Dodd. King’s hints in this direction are not crucial to the story, but they certainly add a scary element as you read.

    King has said, on several occasions, that he wrote this novel at the height of his alcoholism and addiction and it shows. There are no chapters or formal narrative breaks. You are almost forced to read at breakneck speed. Probably the way he wrote it! The narrative takes place over three days with a few flashbacks thrown in to lengthen the plot, but the pace never slows.

    There are quite a few coincidences necessary for the series of unfortunate events to occur, but I never found these coincidences unbelievable or even far-fetched. Often in life, the worst tragedies occur because of a string of coincidences. In my life alone there have been times when I’ve said “if this was a movie, I’d stop watching.” because really, how many coincidences can occur? Apparently, a lot!

    Although the idea of this situation is a bit horrific and indicates gore, King doesn’t use a lot of gore in these pages. There’s some, but not a lot. I think almost anyone could get a thrill of some sort from this novel. The movie is also terrific. I think Dee Wallace gives the performance of a lifetime and it was King that gave her the material to do so.

    Read it. Watch it. You won’t be sorry.

  • Mike (the Paladin)
    Nov 10, 2009

    Gag.

    I thought about just leaving that one word as my review. Or maybe adding "'nuff said" as they used to say in Marvel Comics when I was "younger". I thought maybe though you'd like more.

    I hate it. This is one of those books I can't say enough about...enough bad that is. You like being depressed? You like looking for the worst? Your real life doesn't have enough CRAP happening in it so you want to add more??? Well, then you've found it. If you are the kind of person who says that novels should

    Gag.

    I thought about just leaving that one word as my review. Or maybe adding "'nuff said" as they used to say in Marvel Comics when I was "younger". I thought maybe though you'd like more.

    I hate it. This is one of those books I can't say enough about...enough bad that is. You like being depressed? You like looking for the worst? Your real life doesn't have enough CRAP happening in it so you want to add more??? Well, then you've found it. If you are the kind of person who says that novels should reflect all the pain of real life and more...then this may be the book for you.

    Some great books concern pain, some wonderful novels require pain to be what they are...this one revels in pain and suffering and like de Sade seems to enjoy pain for pain's sake.

    There are 2 of Mr. King's books that left me not frightened or terrorized or even "grossed out" but depressed. This is one of them...

    Did I make it clear, I hate this book???

  • Lyn
    Jul 31, 2011

    Writing a review about Cujo is a little like reminiscing about being a teenager and listening to Black Sabbath.

    Trying to describe it, and to put the experience in words, reveals the cartoonish elements in stark relief. But while being read, the novel is rich with storytelling and more complex than would seem on it's surface.

    Yes, it's about a town that gets eaten by a big, rabid dog, but King is able, and with some credibility, to tell a tale of modern paranoia and suspense, with elements of ho

    Writing a review about Cujo is a little like reminiscing about being a teenager and listening to Black Sabbath.

    Trying to describe it, and to put the experience in words, reveals the cartoonish elements in stark relief. But while being read, the novel is rich with storytelling and more complex than would seem on it's surface.

    Yes, it's about a town that gets eaten by a big, rabid dog, but King is able, and with some credibility, to tell a tale of modern paranoia and suspense, with elements of horror that are all too believable to a modern audience.

  • Nandakishore Varma
    Sep 20, 2011

    I wrote in my review of

    that it was the scariest book that I ever read. Well, that may be, but there the horror ended when I closed the book.

    With Cujo, it started then...

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Every child is afraid of the monster that creeps upon him when the lights are out in the bedroom and mom and dad are safely ensconced in their

    I wrote in my review of

    that it was the scariest book that I ever read. Well, that may be, but there the horror ended when I closed the book.

    With Cujo, it started then...

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Every child is afraid of the monster that creeps upon him when the lights are out in the bedroom and mom and dad are safely ensconced in their room. They hide under the bed or in the closet. The moment the kid lets his guard down, it will creep out and slowly devour him, relishing every luscious bit of flesh. No amount of rationalising can take away the certainty of this fact, at least in the minds of the children.

    talks about this monster. And since it is the frightened child in each one of us that the ghost story talks to, we listen.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Tad Trenton has a problem. There is a monster in his closet, biding its time to devour him; only the "Monster Words" his dad has written is preventing it from fulfilling his intent.

    Vic and Donna Trenton, Tad's parents, have their own monsters to fight - Vic's failing ad agency and Donna's recently concluded extra-marital affair. They move down to the town of Castle Rock, Maine to start a new life - unfortunately, the monsters also follow them.

    A monster of a different kind attacks Cujo, Brett Camber's huge good-natured St. Bernard, as he chases a rabbit down a hole and gets bitten by some very sick bats. The virus of rabies enters his bloodstream: his happy thoughts become tinged with red: and by the time Brett and his mother Charity leave home to visit her sister Holly, Cujo has fully transformed into a monster. He kills Brett's abusive father Joe and their neighbour Gary, and is awaiting an agonising death as Donna and Tad drive into Joe's garage to fix the car's starting problem.

    What happens next is what the novel is about - the stalled car, the woman and child trapped inside, the rabid dog outside - and the steadily mounting suspense culminating in a shattering climax.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    is much more disturbing than

    because of two things - one, the horror follows you after you leave the book and two, because the horror is very much in the real world. Here also, there is the dysfunctional family; however, Tad does not have the powers of Danny Torrance to see the horror out. He is very much a helpless child.

    Also, here the horror is random, incidental. As Steve says, Cujo was a "good" dog - the reason that he got bit by rabid bats while not having taken his anti-rabies shots was just coincidence. One feels, as one reads this novel, that monster in Tad's closet was not imaginary at all. It was the one which crawled out in the form of Cujo. Vic and Donna, being grownups, could not see it - Tad could.

    Read it only if you are such a fan of horror that you like to be seriously disturbed for a long period of time.

  • Edward Lorn
    May 20, 2014

    Cujo is a hard book to read. It's a short book, but there are certain scenes that just gut me. And all those sections occur in the last 25 pages of the book. The first half of this book goes by rather quickly. Then Donna and Tad get stuck out at Camber's place and I simply do not want to continue reading. The first time I read this book was after having watched the movie. Cool enough flick. Slasher film with a dog instead of a masked killer. Survivor is the woman and her son. Rock on. I don't li

    Cujo is a hard book to read. It's a short book, but there are certain scenes that just gut me. And all those sections occur in the last 25 pages of the book. The first half of this book goes by rather quickly. Then Donna and Tad get stuck out at Camber's place and I simply do not want to continue reading. The first time I read this book was after having watched the movie. Cool enough flick. Slasher film with a dog instead of a masked killer. Survivor is the woman and her son. Rock on. I don't like that the dog was used as a monster, but I dealt with it because poor Cuje was sick. And then I read the book.

    There is a big fucking tie-in between Cujo and the rest of King's books that no one ever mentions. My theory is, as far as I know, not impossible. Firstly, Cujo's behavior in the book is constantly referred to as odd. This is aside from the fact that he has rabies. Many times, characters in the book refer to Cujo as more than just a sick dog. Secondly, the closet. Something's living in Tad's closet. This is made cement at the end of the book when Tad's father Vic watches the door knob turn and the door open all by its lonesome. Finally, Frank Dodd is called the monster of Castle Rock at the beginning of the book, and then King goes on to say that that monster returns in 1980. A monster. A monster that can take different forms. A monster that is active in Castle Rock during the time Pennywise is supposedly asleep in Derry. A monster that changes shapes. See where I'm going with this? Think of the gigantic bird that ravages the dance (at least I think it was a dance) in It. Now, stay with me, think about the fact that King wrote The Dead Zone, Cujo, and Pet Sematary all while writing It. Also there are mentions of this "monster" in both Insomnia and the Dark Tower series. Conspiracy theory established. Debunk in the comment section below.

    Notable names:

    George Bannerman, Johnny Smith, and Frank Dodd (The Dead Zone)

    Castle Rock (mentioned throughout the King-verse)

    In summation: If you read Cujo and are not in some way affected by the goings-down in the this book, I don't want to know you because you're an emotional cripple. This book is only bad in the sense that it drags out the worst of humanity and showcases it in the unrelenting sunlight and creates a monster out of a good dog. But this shit happens. It's life. Endings are not always happy things. Oh, and this is the last time I'm reading this book. I'm not doing this shit to myself again. Time for some My Little Pony. Later.

  • Antonio
    Nov 30, 2015

    Alguien me puede decir

    Alguien me puede decir

    Ah sí, es cierto, debería hablar de la historia principal,

    es un perro san Bernardo cariñoso que todos aman, muy parecido a Beethoven, pero ocurre algo terrible, muy simple, nada del otro mundo, pero aun así terrible, le da rabia, y gracias a esta enfermedad, todo lo cariñoso y amoroso que pudo ser, se transforma en odio y ansias de matar, así el perro del que nadie sospecharía, se transforma en una maquina asesina.

    La primera parte del libro es algo desconcertante, porque de lo que menos hablan es del perro, parece más bien casos de familia o telenovela de bajo presupuesto, que si a una mujer le pega su marido, que si otra engaña al marido, que si un hombre va a perder su empleo, alguien gana la lotería, y a otro hombre todo le importa una mierda…

    Considere dejar el libro, pero seguí, y luego me di cuenta que era una estratagema de

    , para que después te des cuenta hasta qué punto se cumple la

    y todo lo que puede salir mal, saldrá mal, hasta llevar a los personajes a la situación catastrófica, e insalvable de enfrentarse a un bestia peluda de más de 100 kilos con rabia.

    Ahora, de vuelta a lo importante,

  • Dan Schwent
    Nov 23, 2016

    When a two hundred pound St. Bernard goes rabid, no one is safe! Who will fall to Cujo before the disease he carries finishes him off?

    I'm just going to come out and say it. Most of this book feels like filler to me. I think King took what was potentially an award winning tale of terror and jammed as much padding into it as he could until it was one of his shorter novels. Basically, it's a fantastic short story wrapped in a soap opera I couldn't give two shits about.

    That being said, Cujo is a rea

    When a two hundred pound St. Bernard goes rabid, no one is safe! Who will fall to Cujo before the disease he carries finishes him off?

    I'm just going to come out and say it. Most of this book feels like filler to me. I think King took what was potentially an award winning tale of terror and jammed as much padding into it as he could until it was one of his shorter novels. Basically, it's a fantastic short story wrapped in a soap opera I couldn't give two shits about.

    That being said, Cujo is a really powerful book in places. While I didn't care about a lot of things on the periphery, the core of it is pretty terrifying and heart-wrenching. No one wants their beloved family pet to turn on them and a rabid dog trapping a woman and her child in a car for DAYS is damn horrifying. As opposed to most of his menaces, Cujo is all too plausible.

    The writing is good and the ending packs a huge punch. I sure didn't see that coming. It was like being kicked in the balls after you're already lying on the ground after being shot in the heart.

    While I found that there was a lot of fat on this bone, it was pretty good at the core. Or marrow, in this case. Three hard-earned stars.

  • Christy
    Oct 24, 2016

    This book was so well written, the characters completely fleshed out, that it's very hard to believe King wrote this book so drunk that he doesn't even remember writing it! Wow! And to then win the British Fantasy Award...and (two!) movies. All I ever seemed to do when I was drunk was trash the house....and worse--hurt those who loved me closest (which is why, like King, I gave the stuff up over a year ago).

    What a complete page turner--very hard to

    This book was so well written, the characters completely fleshed out, that it's very hard to believe King wrote this book so drunk that he doesn't even remember writing it! Wow! And to then win the British Fantasy Award...and (two!) movies. All I ever seemed to do when I was drunk was trash the house....and worse--hurt those who loved me closest (which is why, like King, I gave the stuff up over a year ago).

    What a complete page turner--very hard to put down, especially when the action starts...impossible not to get your stomach in a terrible knot during the last part of the book, ugh--physically painful to read! Earlier on...very sad for dog lovers--before he loses all that was lovable. King is great at many things, and one he's done on several occasions is to write from a dog's point of view--which he does very well once again in Cujo--what happened to him was so unfair. and the tiniest bit of money for a yearly shot would have saved both Cujo from this agonizingly slow, painful, and miserable way to die, as well as the people!

    Of all of King's early novels, this is the only one that relies on horror that can actually happen to normal people....

    This book tells the stories of two very different families. Both with very real problems. Vic and Donna Trenton are facing a crisis in their marriage--infidelity on her part, which is broken off before Vic becomes aware. Unfortunately he finds out at the worst possible time; a time he really needs to focus on his Ad agency.....saving it from losing it's biggest client and plummeting the family out of their successful lifestyle. Their son Tad has his own demons...right in his bedroom closet (which

    .....the door opening when it's latched--and more. It's the only part of the novel which is outside the realm of real-life horror**note on this below). Steve the tennis pro does not take to the break-up very well and adds much more drama that could cost Tad and Donna their lives (or looking at it with an ironic twist possibly save them, because his actions bring Vic running home from his important meeting in New York...) The second family include blue collar Joe and Charity Chambers, and their son Brett--and oh boy, do they face a household of demons as well; including alcoholism, spousal abuse and child abuse....and (most important to this story) neglect of the family dog, especially when it comes to the vet.

    The first half of this book is spent excellently developing the characters (including an superb job with Cujo). When Vic has to leave for his meeting in New York, he leaves Donna with car problems....which leads to Donna and tiny Tad just barely making it to the Cambers' home garage (Joe is an excellent, inexpensive mechanic), when the car finally dies (in near 100 degree weather). Every person in the house is gone for a long time, and they are met by Cujo, whose illness has finally driven him mad. Here begins the gut-wrenching stakeout (for days trapped in the cars growing oven)......It's utterly horrifying, and I do not remember ever forgetting to breath as I read a book, but here I did forget---over and over....I couldn't take it (felt like ripping my own hair out at times!). This book took everything I physically had in me to not die of desperation myself......

    ***I need to add here: Edward Lorn's review adds some pretty cool tie-ins, that make that seemingly unimportant closet door much more interesting!!!!

  • Raha
    Jan 08, 2017

    از اون دسته کتاب هایی بود که موقع خوندنش کلی آدرنالین ترشح می کنید. در کل کتاب خوبی بود....حاشیه زیاد داشت ولی انقدری نبود که حوصله تون رو سر ببره بلکه بیشتر مشتاقتون می کرد که ببینید قراره بعدش چه اتفاقی بیوفته. توصیه میکنم که اگر مثل من یه مقدار ترسو و خیالاتی هستین این کتاب رو قبل از خواب مطالعه نکنید که بعدش تا صبح 20 بار از خواب بپرید و به خودتون و نویسنده ی کتاب لعنت بفرستید :دی