The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Lucy and Edmund, with their dreadful cousin Eustace, get magically pulled into a painting of a ship at sea. That ship is the Dawn Treader, and on board is Caspian, King of Narnia. He and his companions, including Reepicheep, the valiant warrior mouse, are searching for seven lost lords of Narnia, and their voyage will take them to the edge of the world. Their adventures in...

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Title:The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
Author:C.S. Lewis
Rating:
ISBN:006112527X
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:248 pages

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader Reviews

  • Mariel
    Nov 29, 2007

    I knew that the new film version of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was going to be bad. I did not know that it was going to be that retarded that I'd question my faith in my own taste. (Not that I don't like retarded stuff. But boring too? Ouch.) Was the book that bad? I don't remember all of it. It's been years since I've read it. Lauren, you're never picking the movie ever again.

    A video game version of the movie would be better than the movie. At least it would be more difficult! What the fuck

    I knew that the new film version of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was going to be bad. I did not know that it was going to be that retarded that I'd question my faith in my own taste. (Not that I don't like retarded stuff. But boring too? Ouch.) Was the book that bad? I don't remember all of it. It's been years since I've read it. Lauren, you're never picking the movie ever again.

    A video game version of the movie would be better than the movie. At least it would be more difficult! What the fuck was up with the swords? Was that ALL there was to it? I seem to remember there was more... "Hey, there's the lord's sword. Pick it up." There were all these old lords with ZZ Top beards and no one bust out into "She's got legs"? I guess they forgot how to use them when they were asleep for that long. I seem to remember there was more to the lords than that. I seem to remember that Caspian learned more than a trite "Be your own man" message relating to his hero worship of the dad he didn't know (the movie seems to forget that he didn't know his dad). There was more than gripping the flaccid swords of old men and daddy never touched me as a child. Wasn't there?

    The looks thing? What the? Lucy didn't perform a spell to look "beautiful" like Susan (I'm enough of a girl that I thought "Well, she's not THAT pretty..."). She used it to eavesdrop. She found out that her friend said something she didn't mean about her behind her back. Because she did that, they would never be friends the same way again. What Lucy really learned was that people are pissy bitches and one bad mood isn't them all the time. Girls can insult your ugly sweater and still really (sometimes secretly) admire you.

    I know that Eustace becoming a dragon and the process of becoming "himself" again was more. I loved that in the book it wasn't some pansy "Be nice" message. Eustace was a jerk because he was afraid of everything, afraid to think for himself. In the movie he learns to be what the "cool kids" want instead of just not being afraid to change. What the? Boo! The "be yourself" message about Lucy and Caspian did not mesh with the "be like everybody else" message they inflicted on the audience about poor Eustace. (The kid who played Eustace was the only good actor in the film. Lucy is an embarrassment. Also inappropriate! She did that wide-eyed wonder grin when her cousin was stuck as a dragon! What idiots let that one go by? They made their heroine look like a bitch.)

    Okay, they made a lot of mistakes in the pretty bad Prince Caspian film. He shouldn't have been old. It was nothing to meet him again later on in his life if he's still a young man. The stupid Susan romance? Who cares when he meats (Freudian slip) the star chick if they are pissed he forgets about Susan? I hated that movie. It was pre-school LOTR films battle scenes. They got all wrong what were the good parts of the book.

    I know that Edmund admits to being a shit for his first Narnia visit. This is not mentioned in the film. I liked that about Edmund in the book.

    Nothing new here: I always loathed Reepicheep. He's the little thing that runs his big mouth so no one will underestimate him. If he was really that good he wouldn't have to run his mouth. He's also the biggest mouth peice for Aslan-mania.

    The "Bad stuff happens have faith anyway" stuff. I remember that The Last Battle is the most overtly religious book in the series and I managed to ignore the rest in the other books. They upped the ante? Am I a harder sell?

    I don't like this. I feel more or less the same person as before. I'll still read the kids and ya books that recognize the parts of you that you can carry on with you. Not the bad taste for silly melodrama parts but the "That happened and I can't pretend it didn't" experiences. Narnia was such a good part of my life. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was the first book I really remember reading. I don't want it to be the bad part that I only pretended was good to get by.

    P.s. I don't wanna be all Comic Book Guy, but it annoyed the effing hell out of me that Eustace's mom announces in the end that "Jill Pole is here to see you!" Jill wasn't his friend before! Eustace didn't have friends. So annoying.

    Oh yeah! I forgot to say what I thought about writing here while watching that dumb ass movie. They really wasted a golden chance. C.S. Lewis made digs about the loss of freedoms for kids, school systems that babied kids and at the same time allowed fucked up shit to go on so they wouldn't "Stifle" anybody. Kids today have no freedom. Parents will call the cops on each other if they run around outside and play. Yet here was Edmund and Lucy having to be shut-in after they had lived it up as free-thinking adults in Narnia. Instead? They waste it all by bamming audiences on the head about doing what Aslan wants. That doesn't mesh with the good parts of the Narnia series that I remembered it to have.

    EDIT- Lauren will be pissed at me for not mentioning the glow in the dark "eevel" green mist. What the hell was that? I don't remember that. They should just let me write these things. The BBC tv movies back in the day combined Voyage and Prince. Probably because the actual plots were so thin. That's why they should let me do it. I'd have made the whole thing a dragon eating its own skin off movie. Prince Caspian would have been a refugee movie.

    Lauren really hated the actor who played the magician. You know they are a nobody if they weren't in Harry Potter (some exceptions allowed for LOTR actors).

  • Daniel
    Jul 31, 2009

    The strongest of the three "Chronicles of Narnia" books I've read so far, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" opens with a wonderful first line: "There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it." Eustace, a cousin to the four Pevensie children, who the first two books focused on, is the designated asshole in this entry, taking up the mantle carried by Edmund in "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" and Susan in "Prince Caspian."

    I've complained about this trope in my other

    The strongest of the three "Chronicles of Narnia" books I've read so far, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" opens with a wonderful first line: "There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it." Eustace, a cousin to the four Pevensie children, who the first two books focused on, is the designated asshole in this entry, taking up the mantle carried by Edmund in "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" and Susan in "Prince Caspian."

    I've complained about this trope in my other reviews, but I don't have as much of a problem with it this time around because Eustace is so wonderfully bitchy. With the way he talks about his cousins Edmund and Lucy, as well as the Narnians on board the Dawn Treader, particularly in his diary entries, Eustace comes across as a younger, slightly less gay Noel Coward. It's actually a bit of a loss for us, the readers, when he's eventually reformed, just as Edmund and Susan were in the earlier books, and stops being deliciously catty was a result.

    Most of "Voyage" is comprised of a series of set pieces that demonstrate what a lively imagination C.S. Lewis had: the kidnapping by slave traders, Eustace's transformation into a dragon and back into a boy, the pool that turns whatever touches it to gold, the sea people, and the edge of the world. This is both "Voyage"'s strength and its weakness: the scenes are inventive, but the overall story is not terribly cohesive. Rather than threading the pieces together artfully, Lewis tells more of a this-happened-then-that-happened story.

    The writing, especially the dialogue, remains strong, and is even a bit better than in the first two books. (There's a funny line early on in the book when the then-bitchy Eustace disappears and Reepicheep, who's none too fond of him, immediately vows to avenge his murder -- apparently hoping he were, in fact, murdered.)

    OK, on to "The Silver Chair."

  • Laz
    May 06, 2014

    Having read the first book back in Christmas and feeling confused about the reading order I'll say that this was a very enjoyable and easy to read children's book. I'm still struggling to find out who the reading order of Narnia is. I've seen that this is either the 2nd or the 5th book but then again I've seen it being named the 3rd book. I'm just going to read it however I want and hope it'll all be fine. At least, I don't there was any missing detail from the book, so that must be a good thing

    Having read the first book back in Christmas and feeling confused about the reading order I'll say that this was a very enjoyable and easy to read children's book. I'm still struggling to find out who the reading order of Narnia is. I've seen that this is either the 2nd or the 5th book but then again I've seen it being named the 3rd book. I'm just going to read it however I want and hope it'll all be fine. At least, I don't there was any missing detail from the book, so that must be a good thing.

    As to why I gave this 3 stars is because I found it less adventurous than the first one, I felt this one was a bit rushed and yes that's the way children's books usually are but it was a bit too much for me. I loved the characters, although some of the characters of the first book were missing, but we had a new one on the children side, and several new ones on the world of Narnia.

    A journey in the sea on a ship named Dawn Treader. C. S. Lewis is a masterful author, very laconic but at the same time his words are utterly descriptive. The thing with children's books is that they always make me feel nostalgic and give me this feeling we all had as children, I feel carefree.

  • Moraes the Bookworm
    Dec 28, 2015

    is the fifth book in the

    series.

    in the tale itself.

    The story begins when Edmund and Lucy Pevensie are forced to spend their summer away from their parents and siblings with their uncle Harold and aunt Alberta. While neither Edmund or Lucy look forward to their visit with family, the worst part is having to live with their cousin, Eustace Scrub

    is the fifth book in the

    series.

    in the tale itself.

    The story begins when Edmund and Lucy Pevensie are forced to spend their summer away from their parents and siblings with their uncle Harold and aunt Alberta. While neither Edmund or Lucy look forward to their visit with family, the worst part is having to live with their cousin, Eustace Scrub: an intellectual bully, who wishes nothing more than to torment them as much as possible.

    One day, Eustace catches his cousins admiring a painting of a Narnia-esque ship, reminiscing a bit about their wonderful adventures in Narnia. Naturally, the house bully cannot allow this opportunity to pass and begins to needle Lucy and Edmund about their lack of culture and refinement in the arts. However, while he taunts Lucy, something magical happens: the waves begin to surge forth from the painting.

    Soon, the three children find themselves re-encountering old friends, sailing from island to island, rediscovering ancient Narnians, encountering dragons and sea serpents, running afoul of magic after magic, and find themselves changed by all that they see and face.

    Overall, it was a good book, but I have a few complaints. First of all, as much as I loved the sea voyage and the constant discoveries by the adventurers, I found myself growing weary of yet another island with yet another magical danger or unexpected friend. It became kind of predictable. Secondly, the ending - while heartfelt and moving - left me feeling a little disappointed. While the analogy about Aslam's country being haven is great and emotional, I was really expecting to get to see a little bit more of it. Regardless, I would totally recommend it to anyone, Narnia fan or not.

  • Dannii Elle
    Jan 14, 2017

    This is my fourth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order.

    This started rather poignantly for me, as the story opens with two of the Pevensie siblings returning to Narnia, with their cousin Eustace in tow. Without the elder Pevensie children I initially felt like some of the earlier allure was lost for me, as it acted as a reminder that we all reach an age where we grow up and magic refuses to become a possib

    This is my fourth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order.

    This started rather poignantly for me, as the story opens with two of the Pevensie siblings returning to Narnia, with their cousin Eustace in tow. Without the elder Pevensie children I initially felt like some of the earlier allure was lost for me, as it acted as a reminder that we all reach an age where we grow up and magic refuses to become a possibility. I quickly forgot my reservations and was once again swept away by the wonderment and awe this series inspires, however.

    The children find themselves thrown from this world into the ocean that borders the Narnian lands. The nearby ship, the Dawn Voyager, quickly hoists them on board and the children are happily reunited with characters from the previous book, King Caspian and Reepicheep the talking (and quarrelsome) mouse. The crew are venturing into the perilous unknown seas with the ambition of discovering more about their world and ending their journey by hopefully venturing into Aslan's country.

    I adored getting to explore more of this fantastical world. It added an element of adventure and highlighted Lewis' spectacular world-building artistry. This seemed to read almost like a series of connected short stories, as each island they landed on had a tale relating to it that ended as the crew disembarked.

    As with every other story in this series, there was a moralistic edge to the plot that served as a reminder of good behaviour for its young readership. This rather preachy element is one that doesn't fit well with its contemporary readers, in my opinion, and, whilst not ruining my enjoyment of the series, isn't a factor a particularly appreciate.

  • Patrick
    Jan 25, 2016

    It feels odd to mark this book as anything less than five stars. It was a huge part of my childhood.

    What's more, this book is part of the reason I'm a decent public speaker these days. I joined forensics because this was the book that was being used for extemporaneous reading. (I didn't even know what forensics was when I started, just that I liked the book.)

    And there are things I like here. Good things. It's a fun adventure story. There are cool settings. Action. Tension. The different nature o

    It feels odd to mark this book as anything less than five stars. It was a huge part of my childhood.

    What's more, this book is part of the reason I'm a decent public speaker these days. I joined forensics because this was the book that was being used for extemporaneous reading. (I didn't even know what forensics was when I started, just that I liked the book.)

    And there are things I like here. Good things. It's a fun adventure story. There are cool settings. Action. Tension. The different nature of the islands is cool. There's mystery. Magic. Wonder. The character of Reepicheep alone boosts this book by a full star.

    The character of Eustace is better than I remember him being, too. It's nice to see a kid who is a total dick learn that there's consequences to his actions, then have a redemption arc in a kid's book.

    But reading this book to my little boy made me confront a lot of the problems in the book. There are slavers in the early chapters, which is something I didn't remember. And a topic I wasn't sure I wanted to introduce to my kid at the age of 6.

    There's a fair chunk of sexism too. Little things scattered throughout the books. Not terrible considering when it was written. But still nothing I want soaking into my kid's psyche. The best example of this is Ramandu's daughter. Caspian meets her, and it becomes obvious that they're going to get married.

    Let's just pass lightly over the fact that she's effectively being treated like a prize for him completing his quest and jump right into the fact that SHE DOESN'T HAVE A NAME! She's referred to as "Ramandu's daughter" through the entire book despite the fact that she has a larger part in the book.

    That's fucked up, y'all.

    There's narrative issues too. The children rarely solve their own problems. Several times they're confronted by bad situations or make bad choices but then instead of having to deal with the consequences or figure out solutions, Aslan shows up and is all ಠ_ಠ. Then, under the weight of his disappointed dad eyes and they're filled with shame and realize they should stop being dicks. That's not good storytelling. That's some deus ex leo bullshit.

    It's a good book, and I'm fond of it. But it's not perfect, and its flaws are large enough that they bear some serious consideration before you put it in front of your kids.

  • Frogy (Ivana)
    Feb 06, 2016

    Moram da priznam da me je Ripičip baš nervirao, ali su mi zato Smotavci ili Smotopadi sjajni :)

  • Neda
    Feb 09, 2016

    خیلی بهتر از جلد قبل بود.. ماجراها عالی بودن و پیش می رفتم به ویژه اولهای کتاب.

    اما یه چیزی رو چندان دوست نداشتم اونم اینه که دوست داشتم سرزمین اسلان رو بیشتر توضیح بده و یا یه جوریهایی بیشتر خود اسلان هم باشه توش..

    خب اما این مانع این نمیشه که 5 تا ستاره رو بهش ندم..

    :)

    بسی لذت بردم..

    ^-^

  • Victoria Hansen
    Mar 13, 2016

    REVIEW COMING SOON.

  • Kellyn Roth
    May 30, 2016

    My BFF thinks this book is boring ... but I disagree. I really love it. All of the little islands they visit hold an amazing story. I just can't believe the movie wrecked this beautiful adventure so!

    ~Kellyn Roth,