Y: The Last Man, Vol. 1: Unmanned

Y: The Last Man, Vol. 1: Unmanned

"Y" is none other than unemployed escape artist Yorick Brown (his father was a Shakespeare buff), and he's seemingly the only male human left alive after a mysterious plague kills all Y-chromosome carriers on earth. But why are he and his faithful companion, the often testy male monkey Ampersand, still alive? He sets out to find the answer (and his girlfriend), while runni...

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Title:Y: The Last Man, Vol. 1: Unmanned
Author:Brian K. Vaughan
Rating:
ISBN:1563899809
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:128 pages

Y: The Last Man, Vol. 1: Unmanned Reviews

  • Felicia
    Feb 07, 2009

    Ok so maybe it's just me but I found this series to be incredibly chauvinist. I know I'm gonna get flamed for it, so many ppl rave about it. I APPRECIATED IT but the premise and execution and what the women were doing, boy oh boy.

    I'm gonna shut up and not review this. Check box'd.

  • Nancy
    Sep 21, 2010

    I haven’t read a comic book since I was a child, saving my measly allowance for Archie and his friends. Once I discovered my mother’s Harold Robbins novels, I never went back to comics…until now.

    A number of my Goodreads friends enjoy graphic novels (as they are called now), so I became curious and asked my friend

    for a recommendation. Y: The Last Man was perfect for me to start with. I love post-apocalyptic stories and wanted some light, easy reading between school books.

    A plague that des

    I haven’t read a comic book since I was a child, saving my measly allowance for Archie and his friends. Once I discovered my mother’s Harold Robbins novels, I never went back to comics…until now.

    A number of my Goodreads friends enjoy graphic novels (as they are called now), so I became curious and asked my friend

    for a recommendation. Y: The Last Man was perfect for me to start with. I love post-apocalyptic stories and wanted some light, easy reading between school books.

    A plague that destroys the world’s male population, except a young man and his monkey. Amazons who want to rid the world of the last vestige of male oppression. A model who disposes of corpses. A mysterious agent who knits. Republicans with guns. Humorous dialogue, great illustrations, fun characters and a fast-paced story made me gobble this up in one sitting.

    Looking forward to more!

  • Michael
    Nov 28, 2010

    In typical comic book male-centric fashion, this series wonders what life would be like if all men died spontaneously...except for one.

    I suppose if we're trying to put ourselves in the head of an early-nineties comic book reading teen, this might feel innovative. Unfortunately, I find that innovative in the world of comics is pretty much Iron Age for the rest of literature. How does Vaughan manage to make a series with gender issues at its center so bizarrely sexist?

    Example: In a world where a

    In typical comic book male-centric fashion, this series wonders what life would be like if all men died spontaneously...except for one.

    I suppose if we're trying to put ourselves in the head of an early-nineties comic book reading teen, this might feel innovative. Unfortunately, I find that innovative in the world of comics is pretty much Iron Age for the rest of literature. How does Vaughan manage to make a series with gender issues at its center so bizarrely sexist?

    Example: In a world where all men are dead except for one, and the death of that one man will mean the end of humanity, VIOLENT CULTS OF FEMINISTS SPRING UP TO TRY AND HUNT DOWN MEN AND MALE SYMPATHIZERS. What is the motive here? There sure isn't one written into the plot, other than the one speech about social inequality between the sexes--and how the only way to escape this inequality is to KILL ALL MEN.

    Characterwise, I was exceptionally not impressed. Even the main character has vague motivations. As for the women, pretty much none of them function as anything but placeholders: the token love interest, the sister who has gone astray, the protective mother. IN A WORLD WHERE ONLY ONE MAN SURVIVED...apparently the world still revolves around that man.

    And here's where the cultural rant starts...

    This is a symptom of thinking that is still prevalent in most of popular culture, although not to as great an extent in literature. F'rinstance, lets talk about movies: movies are a great medium for making political statements. Statements about social injustices, such as the way that women are objectified, sexualized, expected to live up to some bleached, shaved, makeup-smeared, surgically modified yet waifishly thin ideal that has been developed over centuries of patriarchal society...and how this objectification upon women is psychologically damaging--to men.

    This poor guy above has been so mentally warped by Hollywood and advertising that he's incapable of developing a physical attraction to any of the normal girls he knows in real life. Let's take a moment to pitty him.

    Okay, we done? Good. Fortunately, a blonde porn star moves in next door, and immediately falls for him, even though he's intensely dorky, because, you know, it's what's on the inside that counts. But, I'm not just cherry-picking films here. I could point to this one:

    Another example of an attractive woman with a *cough cough* career who ends up with a loser whose only redeeming trait is that he's willing to "raise" the baby...if sleazy frat boys without jobs can be said to raise babies.

    But surely this is a phenomenon in teen comedies?

    Well, look at "romances."

    Here's a fairly recent romantic comedy where a successful, relatively well-balanced woman who is portrayed as HORRIBLY DESPARATE for being interested in a neighbor....meanwhile, the character played by Gerard Butler mudwrestles with models on television, and has no interest in anything but one-night stands, yet this is understandable because of his childhood. This is a ROMANCE. Aren't these supposed to be geared more towards female audiences? It really bothers me that I'm more bothered by this film than any women I know.

    End rant.

    Okay, BUT, regardless of how inadequately this comic deals with gender issues, it at least TRIES to grapple with them, and it does a better job than any of the movies mentioned above. Perhaps by the end of the series, the author's portrayals of gender issues will become more interesting and sophisticated. This was an entertaining comic, and I plan on continuing it for at least a little longer...but I'll admit that I'm highly confused by the acclaim it has gotten.

  • Brad
    Dec 22, 2011

    So there's this thing that happens in post-apocalypse stories that I need to talk to you about.

    You know how in a zombiepocalypse story we occassionally receive hints that it might be better for the women to stay safe so they can make babies? Usually it's only hints, and the male characters don't seem to want to offend the post-feminist sensibilities of the women, so instead the women tote guns and put their wombs at risk of becoming a zombie-buffet. But everyone gets along-ish, and there are us

    So there's this thing that happens in post-apocalypse stories that I need to talk to you about.

    You know how in a zombiepocalypse story we occassionally receive hints that it might be better for the women to stay safe so they can make babies? Usually it's only hints, and the male characters don't seem to want to offend the post-feminist sensibilities of the women, so instead the women tote guns and put their wombs at risk of becoming a zombie-buffet. But everyone gets along-ish, and there are usually plenty of women and men, so it doesn't seem like fertility is the

    important concern.

    Or you get the big, bad group of fascist men trying to turn some poor girl into a "breeder" for the new human race, but she tends to rise up, spank their patriarchal asses, escape with her girl power intact, and hook up with some nice guy with whom she's fought for survival.

    And in the bleakest of apocalypses there's no hope anyway, so who gives a shit about procreation? Everyone's dead or dying, cannibalism is running rampant, society has failed, and humans are doomed to extinction. The best the survivors can do is keep hiking down some road to whatever is further down the road with the world as nothing but the road.

    But I've totally fucking had it now that I've read

    . This book really pisses me off to no end.

    I'm fine with the Amazonian self-mutilators (I can buy an angry, post-apocalyptic group of violent women). I am willing to suspend my disbelief that Yorick and his monkey make it through the manpocalypse as the only surviving Y chromosomes. I'll yawn and tolerate the Yankee setting of yet another apocalypse. I'll cringe but cope with yet another bad ass, dreadlocked, African-American woman who's the most capable and violent person around. I'll even believe that spindly little Yorick can pass as a woman as long as he has his gas mask on.

    But what I won't believe, what I won't buy, where I won't suspend by disbelief, where I am not fine is with the idea that Yorick would ever, EVER, be allowed to wander around the winter of homo sapienism with one body guard, risking his testicles for some stupid, pointless, selfish, idiotic search for the love of his life and his sister. His sperm, and Ampersand's, would be the most important substances known to womankind (not because he is a man but because of sheer practicality). He would be protected whether he liked it or not. He would be imprisoned. His sperm would be used to impregnate. It would be used to find an immunity for future boys. It would be used for the survival of homo sapiens. Period.

    I heard this book was really great -- a must read graphic novel. At best it is okay ... if you look past the idiocy of Yorick's wanderings, his insufferable smarminess, that stupid fucking monkey, and the poorest characterizations of women you're ever likely to see. Why two stars then? Because it isn't quite as bad as the

    '

    -- though it is damn close.

  • StoryTellerShannon
    Jan 08, 2012

    What if all the men, except one young man and his male monkey pet, were wiped out all over the world and nobody knew why exactly? That's the setup for volume one of this series that takes a look at gender issues and progressive science versus a natural order of things. I like that the explanation for the plague is not known and there are several possibilities.

    There's a fair amount of mischievous style humor in the first volume. For instance, women commemorate the dead man at an obvious phallic

    What if all the men, except one young man and his male monkey pet, were wiped out all over the world and nobody knew why exactly? That's the setup for volume one of this series that takes a look at gender issues and progressive science versus a natural order of things. I like that the explanation for the plague is not known and there are several possibilities.

    There's a fair amount of mischievous style humor in the first volume. For instance, women commemorate the dead man at an obvious phallic symbol a la The Washington Monument. Extremists women take on the role of the ancient Amazons and tear off one breast and take to believing Mother Earth meant to eradicate the males. Hardcore GOPs may take offense when Republican wives of dead senators show up with guns, arguing they should have a voice in the new government.

    The main character, Yorick, is a putz and sometimes clueless but believable enough even though some might argue he is a passive character. The super model turned corpse collector who just got her implants is an obvious jab at how the fashion industry and of course female looks are intertwined with male desires. Overall, I'd say this is a very good start but if you're the nitpicking type you may not enjoy it as much because everything hasn't been explained.

    A good starting read, by the way, for people new to comics/graphic novels.

    The series has received 5 prestigious Eisner Awards. Hollywood has been trying to make this into a movie since 2007. Some say this series saved Vertigo Comics from financial problems.

  • Melki
    Jan 17, 2013

    Meet Yorick, an unemployed English major with moderate-to-poor computer skills. He lives on ramen noodles. And, oh yeah, his hobby is magic.

    You probably wouldn't sleep with him if he was the...well, nevermind.

    There he is, ladies - The Last Man on Earth.

    The dating pool has just gotten a little smaller thanks to a mysterious plague that has wiped out all males,

    Meet Yorick, an unemployed English major with moderate-to-poor computer skills. He lives on ramen noodles. And, oh yeah, his hobby is magic.

    You probably wouldn't sleep with him if he was the...well, nevermind.

    There he is, ladies - The Last Man on Earth.

    The dating pool has just gotten a little smaller thanks to a mysterious plague that has wiped out all males, cute puppies and kittens included, on the planet. All except for the above mentioned guy and the male helper monkey he's fostering.

    Yeah. It takes a little getting used to...

    So what are the gals up to? Surprisingly, they're not laying in a supply of batteries, or rejoicing in that toilet seat thing being forever solved...like I would be. No. Everyone seems to have an agenda, and there are a lot of kick-ass broads out there. So much for Peace on Earth with the women in charge. There are power struggles aplenty.

    This volume does a great job of setting up the series. I liked the old-fashioned comic book look of it, and the attention to detail.

    Alas, as poor Yorick and his bodyguard, Agent 355 (she really needs a nickname), set out to find the cause of the plague and a possible cure, we're left with many questions that HAD BETTER be answered in the next volumes, not the least of which is, will Yorick be able to remain faithful to his sweetie when he kind of needs to repopulate the human race?

    I know a good man is hard to find, but this is ridiculous.

  • Rincey
    Nov 16, 2014

    Well, I get why everyone LOOOVES this book but some of it just rubbed me the wrong way. Like I don't understand why the entire world just stops functioning completely. Are there no female engineers or scientists or electricians in the entirety of the world?

  • Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
    Jan 30, 2015

    Yorick Brown is that guy who can't hold down a job. Plays with magic..and he is the last man on earth. Something has killed off everything male on the planet. He and his pet monkey are all that's left.

    Now gangs of women called the Amazons, a bunch of Republicans and his brainwashed sister Hero are all wanting a piece of Yorick.

    Either to kill him or mate him. He just wants to find his fiance in Australia.

    This was a fun book. I thought it was going to go very political but quickly became a fun

    Yorick Brown is that guy who can't hold down a job. Plays with magic..and he is the last man on earth. Something has killed off everything male on the planet. He and his pet monkey are all that's left.

    Now gangs of women called the Amazons, a bunch of Republicans and his brainwashed sister Hero are all wanting a piece of Yorick.

    Either to kill him or mate him. He just wants to find his fiance in Australia.

    This was a fun book. I thought it was going to go very political but quickly became a fun book.

  • Brian Yahn
    Oct 26, 2016

    has a great premise -- all males (of every species) suddenly die -- except one. The story focuses on the lone male survivor and is an unraveling of why / how he survived the mysterious scourge.

    It helps that the last man standing is humorous and likable like so many of Brian K. Vaughan's characters. Also that he has this noble desire to make it to the other side of the world to reunite with his girlfriend (and repopulate the world). The story is essentially about all the things ge

    has a great premise -- all males (of every species) suddenly die -- except one. The story focuses on the lone male survivor and is an unraveling of why / how he survived the mysterious scourge.

    It helps that the last man standing is humorous and likable like so many of Brian K. Vaughan's characters. Also that he has this noble desire to make it to the other side of the world to reunite with his girlfriend (and repopulate the world). The story is essentially about all the things getting in his way.

    I wish this installment had a little more of a closing to it, but either way, I still want to read more.

  • Matthew
    Feb 18, 2017

    I discovered this series randomly while looking through graphic novels on Hoopla. I had never heard of it before but recognized the author. The premise sounded interesting

    so I decided to give it a go.

    I am glad I did! The story has been great so far! Every page had me interested in finding out what happens next. Also, of all the "apocalyptic" scenarios I have seen, this is the most creative by far.

    I am looking forward

    I discovered this series randomly while looking through graphic novels on Hoopla. I had never heard of it before but recognized the author. The premise sounded interesting

    so I decided to give it a go.

    I am glad I did! The story has been great so far! Every page had me interested in finding out what happens next. Also, of all the "apocalyptic" scenarios I have seen, this is the most creative by far.

    I am looking forward to volume 2!

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