The Little Prince

The Little Prince

Moral allegory and spiritual autobiography, The Little Prince is the most translated book in the French language. With a timeless charm it tells the story of a little boy who leaves the safety of his own tiny planet to travel the universe, learning the vagaries of adult behaviour through a series of extraordinary encounters. His personal odyssey culminates in a voyage to E...

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Title:The Little Prince
Author:Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Rating:
ISBN:0156012197
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:83 pages

The Little Prince Reviews

  • Anne
    May 10, 2007

    There's a huge place in my heart for this little world-in-a-book; I read it first when I was wee, again many times since. A review won't do it justice, so I'll quote one of my favorite passages and risk sentimentality:

    ---

    "Nothing is perfect," sighed the fox.

    But he came back to his idea.

    "My life's very monotonous," he said. "I hunt chickens; men hunt me.

    All chickens are just alike, and all the men are just alike.

    And in consequence, I am a little bored.

    But if you tame me, it'll be as if the sun ca

    There's a huge place in my heart for this little world-in-a-book; I read it first when I was wee, again many times since. A review won't do it justice, so I'll quote one of my favorite passages and risk sentimentality:

    ---

    "Nothing is perfect," sighed the fox.

    But he came back to his idea.

    "My life's very monotonous," he said. "I hunt chickens; men hunt me.

    All chickens are just alike, and all the men are just alike.

    And in consequence, I am a little bored.

    But if you tame me, it'll be as if the sun came to shine on my life.

    I shall know the sound of a step that'll be different from all the others.

    Other steps send me hurrying back underneath the ground.

    Yours will call me, like music out of my burrow.

    And then look: you see the grain-fields down yonder?

    I do not eat bread. Wheat is of no use to me.

    The wheat fields have nothing to say to me. And that is sad.

    But you have hair that is the color of gold.

    Think how wonderful that will be when you have tamed me!

    The grain, which is also golden, will bring me back the thought of you.

    And I shall love to listen to the wind in the wheat…"

    ---

  • Erin
    Apr 29, 2008

    We are all children in adults bodies. Yes we are, don't think we aren't for one moment. The fact that we WERE, indeed, children, is a huge part of each of us. It is possible to shed a few appreciative tears on every page of this book if you entertain the thought that the pilot IS The Little Prince. Maybe you won't think that--maybe you'll have your own take on the book---that's the magic about it. This book is translated to English from French. If you understand and/or appreciate French, the del

    We are all children in adults bodies. Yes we are, don't think we aren't for one moment. The fact that we WERE, indeed, children, is a huge part of each of us. It is possible to shed a few appreciative tears on every page of this book if you entertain the thought that the pilot IS The Little Prince. Maybe you won't think that--maybe you'll have your own take on the book---that's the magic about it. This book is translated to English from French. If you understand and/or appreciate French, the deliciousness of that fact can affect you in addition to the sweet storyline itself. The book won't even take you a whole day to read. Consider honoring the Little You that still remains, and resides within you, and read this 'salute' to childhood, to innocence, and to you. It just takes a 'Little' imagination and bravery.

  • Manny
    Dec 20, 2008

    The next asteroid the Little Prince came to was inhabited by a Quiz Addict. He sat hunched in front of his laptop, and barely looked up when the Little Prince greeted him. There was nowhere else to sit, since the whole asteroid was covered in books.

    "Good morning!" said the Little Prince.

    "I'm sorry, I don't have time to talk to you," said the Quiz Addict. "I am very busy. Wait. In

    , what color was Edward's car?"

    "I don't know," said the Little Prince. "I have never read this book

    .

    The next asteroid the Little Prince came to was inhabited by a Quiz Addict. He sat hunched in front of his laptop, and barely looked up when the Little Prince greeted him. There was nowhere else to sit, since the whole asteroid was covered in books.

    "Good morning!" said the Little Prince.

    "I'm sorry, I don't have time to talk to you," said the Quiz Addict. "I am very busy. Wait. In

    , what color was Edward's car?"

    "I don't know," said the Little Prince. "I have never read this book

    ."

    "I think it was blue," said the man. "Damn! I was wrong. Silver. In

    , who joined the Cullen family first?"

    "I told you," said the Little Prince, "that I haven't read this book. But it must be an interesting book if you answer questions about it all day long. I would very much like to read it."

    "It is the stupidest book ever written!" said the man.

    "Then why do you answer questions about it all day long?" asked the Little Prince.

    "Because if I don't," sighed the man, "then my friend on asteroid B451 will get ahead of me. "He has read the whole series. Luckily, he hasn't read

    ."

    "When you have finished the Quiz," asked the Little Prince, "I hope you will be able to read some of these books you have around you? I notice that you have had

    on your to-read list for the last six months."

    "It is a Never-Ending Quiz," answered the man. "In

    , what color was Edward's car?"

    "I believe you said silver?" answered the Little Prince politely.

    "Thank you," muttered the man. "Yes! You were right. I should have known that."

    "I'm sorry, I must be going," said the Little Prince. And he went on his way, thinking that grown-ups were very, very, very strange.

  • Nataliya
    May 02, 2010

    -----------

    my mother asked as carefully and gently as only adults who know that loss of innocence can be crushing but is brutal

    -----------

    my mother asked as carefully and gently as only adults who know that loss of innocence can be crushing but is brutally necessary can do.

    ' I replied with the comforting stubbornness of an eight-year-old.

    Later that night, I quietly reread the book and the sad truth clicked, and so did the belated thought that

    Or so I see now.

    Back then, I decided to read the author's biography instead as a distraction from the thoughts that were trying to be a bit more grown-up than my heart cared for - I was the odd kid of a literature teacher mother, after all - just to learn that just after writing this book, Antoine de Saint Exupery died when flying his plane in a war to liberate his country, killed by adults who played a game of war, too dangerous and cruel. And that finally made me cry.

    And then I went back to the simple security of childhood.

    I learned the painful understanding of why certain vain but naive roses can hold such sad power over our hearts. I learned the comfort and longing of nostalgia, the fear of the crushing burden of loneliness, the understanding of fragile beauty of the world that can be so easily taken away at any moment. I became a grown-up, and I have to learn to reconcile my inner child with my outer age.

    Now, reading this intensely lyrical and mesmerizing book written by an ailing middle-aged adult far away from the country he loved in the middle of war-torn years, I am confronted with emotions that ruthlessly hurt, hidden in the deceiving simplicity of a (supposedly) children's story just like an elephant was hidden inside a boa constrictor - or was it simply a hat all along? - in the opening paragraphs of this book. I sigh and tear up, and try to resist the urge to pick up the golden-haired child that never stopped until he got answers to his questions and carry him away into safety. But I can't.

    This is not a book for children. It's for adults who remember being children and feel nostalgia for the simple comfort of childhood innocence but know they can never go back to it.

    Unlike the Little Prince, they can no longer go back - but they can look at the night starry sky and laugh, and imagine that they hear an answering clear laughter.

  • Stephen
    Aug 15, 2010

    A

    review

    This was a

    for me to review. I wasn't sure of the best perspective from which to provide comments so as to be of assistance to my fellow readers since this is a children's book (rather than YA which would be reviewed purely on its own merits). After a short session of "what should I do," I bravely decided to

    , figuring that there are already more than enough excellent reviews of this without my clogging up the cyber arteries with another

    A

    review

    This was a

    for me to review. I wasn't sure of the best perspective from which to provide comments so as to be of assistance to my fellow readers since this is a children's book (rather than YA which would be reviewed purely on its own merits). After a short session of "what should I do," I bravely decided to

    , figuring that there are already more than enough excellent reviews of this without my clogging up the cyber arteries with another one. Therefore, I decided simply to share my experience of reading/listening to the book with my daughter along with a couple of thoughts on the concepts discussed in the story and hope that you can take something useful from it.

    So as part of our nightly routine, my youngest daughter, Sydney, and I have daddy/princess read time. The other night, she and I listened to the audio version of

    while we read along with a copy of the book. As usual, it was an

    experience. I am convinced that I learn more about the stories we read from her and her reactions to the narrative than she does from me...and I love it.

    It's only a two hour audio (86 pages) and yet the two of us spent close to 4 hours listening and talking about the various chapters in the story (plus a brief 15 minute break for Mom to give her a bath while Dad helped big sister Kenzie with her math homework). Sydney had all kinds of questions (some just hysterically funny in how much sense they made from a kid-centric view of the world). We would stop the story after each planet or character to talk about what she thought the story meant and what messages the story was trying to deliver.

    For those of you with children, you know how wonderful this can be and I was on the

    watching my little girl ponder over the book.

    From this perspective, the story was perfect and deserves an easy 5 stars. However, since it's not very helpful to rate a book based on that kind of non-transferable experience, I didn't want to rely solely on that for its final rating.

    After explaining to Syd the goodreads star system, she would give this 4 stars as she really liked the British accent of the narrator and the crazy adventures the Prince experiences on the various planets. BTW, from Sydney's point of view, 4 stars is the absolute ceiling for any book dealing with

    like boys and this would easily earn 5 stars had the story been called the

    Princes are still second class citizens at this stage in her life...and Dad is oh, oh, OH so perfectly fine with that).

    For me, looking at this

    Sydney, I liked it but was not smitten with it enough to go higher than 3 stars. The story is well written and has something to say about the human condition and how people spend too much of their lives focusing on the wrong things and not enough time enjoying where they are. A nice message and one I was happy to expose Sydney to, but I was not always enamored with the path the author took to get there.

    Overall, a good read on its own and a potentially a great experience if shared with your children...as most things in life are.

    3.5 stars.

  • Rajat Ubhaykar
    Dec 20, 2011

    Written as a children's book, I find myself unable to pin down firmly as to what makes The Little Prince such a universally likeable book, be it children or grown-ups. What makes it the Hotel California of literature?

    Is it because most grown-ups secretly love being treated like kids? I think as a grown-up you ought to know better than that. Grown-ups like to be petted around now and then in jest, but that's the end of it. Often, when grown-ups are indeed treated like kids and they're not in the

    Written as a children's book, I find myself unable to pin down firmly as to what makes The Little Prince such a universally likeable book, be it children or grown-ups. What makes it the Hotel California of literature?

    Is it because most grown-ups secretly love being treated like kids? I think as a grown-up you ought to know better than that. Grown-ups like to be petted around now and then in jest, but that's the end of it. Often, when grown-ups are indeed treated like kids and they're not in the mood, there is a tiny matchstick inside each one of them, an insecure ego which flares up angrily like it has been wildly struck against a matchbox. In my experience, grown ups like to be taken very seriously. Very very seriously.

    Is it the clear, simple language? No, it can't be just that. There have been books that have been written with clarity and have been criticized by pedants and pontificating bores for their simplicity. Grown ups like to feel wise and learned by having claimed to read complicated texts that engaged them at an 'intellectual' level. They don't like important things being pointed out to them in simple language, after all they're the know-it-all grown-ups and don't need anybody patronizing them.

    Is it because the book is so short and grown-ups are always keen on finishing books real quick? No, it can't be just that either. I know grown-ups who believe that a good book, like a well-mixed drink, must be held between the fingers and tended to lovingly at length to let it get to your head.

    Is it the timeless lessons that the book cushions behind layers of delightful story-telling? Is it the sense of wonder that the book inspires in the most cynical, world-weary adult, if not for posterity then for a day or an hour? I don't know, could be, could be. Worthy contenders they are, but I think I'm not still not home.

    If I had to lay a bet on it, I'd say everyone adores The Little Prince because we are tired of meeting people from Earth everyday who speak the same dry language of numbers and would love to encounter a sunset-loving, wise prince from the room-sized planet of Asteroid B-612 who talks animatedly about butterflies, baobabs and volcanoes to the child inside us that we've buried long ago underneath the grey tomb of grown-up babble.

    Kurt Vonnegut once expressed how laughable a critic taking himself too seriously is in these memorable words,

    That is exactly how ridiculous critics who despise The Little Prince are. For The Little Prince is that hot fudge sundae garnished with generous toppings of lost innocence, shared loneliness, deliciously recycled perspective and lessons worth repeating to yourself to keep from succumbing to the unsavoury, contagious disease of adulthood.

    To make your job easier, here are some lessons from the book worth remembering and repeating:

  • Franco  Santos
    Apr 22, 2014

    Un libro tan brillante como una estrella. Me corrijo: mi estrella. La que, para mí, siempre será la más brillante.

  • Alejandro
    Oct 30, 2014

    I plan to read

    since many time ago, and I was aware that it was a quick reading, but still I hadn’t do it yet, until now.

    I went to the cinema theaters and I watched the new animated film about it, and while I hadn’t read the book, I watched the film and I loved it. I was aware that it wasn’t an exact adaptation per se, and then I knew th

    I plan to read

    since many time ago, and I was aware that it was a quick reading, but still I hadn’t do it yet, until now.

    I went to the cinema theaters and I watched the new animated film about it, and while I hadn’t read the book, I watched the film and I loved it. I was aware that it wasn’t an exact adaptation per se, and then I knew that it was about time to read the book.

    It was a quick reading, it took me like a couple of hours. Wonderful book.

    is a metaphorical and surrealist journey where a rose isn’t necessarily a rose, a fox isn’t always a fox, a small planet isn’t a small planet all the time...

    All those things and more that you can find in the book, they will be whatever you need to be. You just need to recognize what will be the rose, what will be the fox, what will be the small planet...

    And then, and only then you will be able to realice the power behind of this cute little book.

    Also, a hidden wonder about this book is that you not only need to realice what things in your own life to interchange with the ones in the Little Prince’s journey, but moreover, you need to “see” with your heart and being able to find the “well” in every “desert”.

    Sometimes isn’t easy, and I guess that there will be moments when those deserts are truly dry, maybe there was a well some time ago, but it’s long gone. But only you, if you are careful and “observant” with your heart, you will be able to make the difference.

    At plain sight, your eyes can deceive you about what it’s in front of you, but if you learn to “watch” with your heart, rarely you will be fooled about it.

    So, not matter if you are in a desert or a little planet (most likely an asteroid), be prepared to take flight and be ready with paper and a pencil, since who knows? Maybe the Little Prince will need you to draw something beyond the evident...

  • فرشاد
    Feb 24, 2016

    یاد آن روزها که بلندترین ساختمان شهر، سیلوی گندم بود بخیر، آن روز ها، عصر که میشد میرفتم در حیاط خانه و جایی پشت بوته گل رز پنهان میشدم، آن وقت به انتظار گربه های ی بخت برگشته مینشتم. سر و کله یکی شان که پیدا میشد، با لنگه کفش کهنه به سوی ش نشانه میرفتم و سپس پرتابی بی نهایت جانانه. با تمام این اوصاف چابکی گربه از دقت نشانه گیری من افزون بود و تیر هرگز به هدف اصابت نمیکرد. جز یکبار که کفش کهنه به کمر گربه نگون بخت برخورد کرد و گربه فریادی از سر درد و غافلگیر ی برآورد. آن روز اولین باری بود که خو

    یاد آن روزها که بلندترین ساختمان شهر، سیلوی گندم بود بخیر، آن روز ها، عصر که میشد میرفتم در حیاط خانه و جایی پشت بوته گل رز پنهان میشدم، آن وقت به انتظار گربه های ی بخت برگشته مینشتم. سر و کله یکی شان که پیدا میشد، با لنگه کفش کهنه به سوی ش نشانه میرفتم و سپس پرتابی بی نهایت جانانه. با تمام این اوصاف چابکی گربه از دقت نشانه گیری من افزون بود و تیر هرگز به هدف اصابت نمیکرد. جز یکبار که کفش کهنه به کمر گربه نگون بخت برخورد کرد و گربه فریادی از سر درد و غافلگیر ی برآورد. آن روز اولین باری بود که خود را یک فاتح یافتم.

    بزرگتر که شدم آزار گربه ها ارزشش را برآیم از دست داد. ظهر ها که در خانه تنها بودم چسب مایع را برمیداشتم و میرفتم سر وقت لانه مورچه ها، آن وقت یک دایره بزرگ چسب مایع اطراف لانه مورچه ها میکشید م و به تماشا ی محاصره ارتش سیاهشان مینشتم، لحظات ی بعد چسب را با کبریت آتش میزدم و به نظاره ی خط آتشی که دایره چسب مایع را میپیمود مشغول میشدم، آن وقت حشره کش را روی آتش اسپری میکردم، در یک آن کره اثیری آتش شکل میگرفت و ارتش مورچه ها به ناگاه به ذرات دوده سیاه تبدیل میشد و به بالا عروج میکرد. تا لحظاتی غرق در لذت بی انتها یی میشدم و برق غرور را در چشمانم احساس میکردم.

    آن روز ها پدر م شب ها برآیم حافظ و مولانا میخواند و گاهی داستان های کهن ایرانی، و من که به راستی انسانی آزاد بودم هر بار به بهانه ای محفل ادبی را ترک میکردم و از بند تعلق کتاب و فرهنگ آزاد بودم،

    جاه طلبی، ویژگی بارز من در آن دوره بود، در هر مسابقه ای که در مدرسه برگزار میشد فارغ از محتوای آن شرکت میکردم و برای اول شدن با تمامی توان تلاش میکردم، یادم هست یک روز که نوبت اهدای جوایز بود، مدیر نام مرا هیجده بار خواند و آن روز آنقدر جایزه گرفتم که مجبور شدم برای انتقال شان به خانه از کمک دوستان استفاده کنم، پدر م از دیدن این صحنه با حالتی متاسف به چشمهایم نگاه کرد و غم محوی در چهره اش آشکار شد، ضمن آنکه این اتفاق مرا به فردی منفور در میان همکلاسی ها تبدیل کرد، هرچند فاتح بودن ارزش آن تنهایی سهمگین را داشت،

    نمیدانم کودکی ام، آنتوان دو سنت اگزوپری را ناامید کرده یا نه، یا سبک طبیعی زندگی ام ریشخند بزرگی ست به آنچه آنتوان سعی در طبیعی خواندنش دارد یا نه، یا شاید دلیل این همه خستگی، آن همه صرف انرژی در کودکی باشد، یا آه مورچه ها که به تعبیر حافظ از گردون هم بگذرد، اما اولین بار که مادر م شازده کوچولو را برآیم خواند خود را با آن شخصیت پروتوگانیست لوس و آبکی غریبه یافتم.

  • Hailey (HaileyInBookland)
    Dec 15, 2016

    So amazing. I can see many rereads of this in the years to come.