How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food

How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food

The ultimate one-stop vegetarian cookbook-from the author of the classic How to Cook EverythingHailed as "a more hip Joy of Cooking" by the Washington Post, Mark Bittman's award-winning book How to Cook Everything has become the bible for a new generation of home cooks, and the series has more than 1 million copies in print. Now, with How to Cook Everything: Vegetarian, Bi...

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Title:How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food
Author:Mark Bittman
Rating:
ISBN:0764524836
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:1008 pages

How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food Reviews

  • Sara
    Nov 16, 2007

    This book is useful not just for the recipes, but for the illustrations and instructions on how to chose, prepare and cook various types of vegetables. He addresses various staples of the vegetarian diet with brief introductions followed by recipes and tips.

    Non-vegetarians could find this book very useful, in expanding their fruit and vegetable repertoire as well as just adding to their stock recipes for common ingredients. Plus, not every recipe here is for a main dish, so many of his ideas wo

    This book is useful not just for the recipes, but for the illustrations and instructions on how to chose, prepare and cook various types of vegetables. He addresses various staples of the vegetarian diet with brief introductions followed by recipes and tips.

    Non-vegetarians could find this book very useful, in expanding their fruit and vegetable repertoire as well as just adding to their stock recipes for common ingredients. Plus, not every recipe here is for a main dish, so many of his ideas would be useful in filling out a meatier menu.

    I enjoyed reading some of it straight through, skipping over ingredients I don't like and then used the handy and well-organized index to identify recipes I would cook from. Bittman shares some of personal preferences and suggestions along with page references, so when he suggests a variation on one recipe, he leads you conveniently to further instructions.

    I don't usually buy cookbooks, I just browse them and save the recipes I like. But this is a great blend of kitchen reference and menu-planning and I want it on my shelf permanently. It's going on my Christmas list, and it ought to go on the "Worth A Try" list of anyone who loves to, or is learning to cook.

  • Kristine
    Jan 26, 2008

    You don't have to be a vegetarian to love this book. Plenty of omnivores have given this book rave reviews. I've been cooking from this book for my blog,

    and everything I have made has been fabulous. I love that Bittman gives a lot of variations and twist to his recipes and overall they're easy and healthy. I do use less oil than he does though.

  • Jeanette
    Jan 27, 2008

    This is an amazingly comprehensive book! My two favorite things about it are: 1)The TRUE simplicity of many of the recipes. Just a handful of ingredients you have on hand and can throw together for something healthy and tasty.

    2) Many of the recipes can easily be converted to vegan. He even gives variations of the main recipe that include vegan choices.

    This book has something for everyone. It's an excellent reference manual for much more than recipes.

    It would be a fantastic gift for someone who d

    This is an amazingly comprehensive book! My two favorite things about it are: 1)The TRUE simplicity of many of the recipes. Just a handful of ingredients you have on hand and can throw together for something healthy and tasty.

    2) Many of the recipes can easily be converted to vegan. He even gives variations of the main recipe that include vegan choices.

    This book has something for everyone. It's an excellent reference manual for much more than recipes.

    It would be a fantastic gift for someone who doesn't know much about basic cooking techniques. The illustrations and instructions for these techniques are admirable.

  • Inder
    Mar 26, 2008

    This a great basic cookbook!

    My only issue is whether I need this giant tome in ADDITION to Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. There's a lot of overlap, and the answer is probably no. I prefer Deborah Madison's format and style slightly, but the books are similar in many ways. The clincher: I already own Deborah Madison's book.

    Still, I could totally see living out of this book, much as I already do with Deborah Madison. This is a great resource for old and new vegetarians alike,

    This a great basic cookbook!

    My only issue is whether I need this giant tome in ADDITION to Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. There's a lot of overlap, and the answer is probably no. I prefer Deborah Madison's format and style slightly, but the books are similar in many ways. The clincher: I already own Deborah Madison's book.

    Still, I could totally see living out of this book, much as I already do with Deborah Madison. This is a great resource for old and new vegetarians alike, or for meat eaters who eat vegetarian sometimes (which is to say, everyone). If you like this better than Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, I won't blame you.

    I have limited cookbook real estate - my cookbook corner is already precariously piled high. So even though this is a more useful tome than Patricia Well's Vegetable Harvest, I might buy the latter instead of this one, because it's less basic and more fancy, and thus fits in a slightly different niche.

  • Anna Wanderer
    Jan 16, 2009

    This is one of the most useful cookbooks on my shelf. I use it several times a week and have not yet made anything that I didn't like. It has helped me try new foods with confidence.

  • Steven Peterson
    Aug 31, 2009

    This is an interesting cookbook. Mark Bittman, who has created other cookbooks, takes a shot at a vegetarian cookbook. One nice wrinkle--he shows Vegans how they can adapt some of these recipes to their needs. He begins by noting that (Page ix) "Increasingly, Americans are becoming `flexitarians,' a recently invented word that describes both vegetarians who aren't that strict and meat-eaters who are striving for a more health conscious, planet friendly diet." He follows up by noting, simply, tha

    This is an interesting cookbook. Mark Bittman, who has created other cookbooks, takes a shot at a vegetarian cookbook. One nice wrinkle--he shows Vegans how they can adapt some of these recipes to their needs. He begins by noting that (Page ix) "Increasingly, Americans are becoming `flexitarians,' a recently invented word that describes both vegetarians who aren't that strict and meat-eaters who are striving for a more health conscious, planet friendly diet." He follows up by noting, simply, that (Page x): "A diet that is high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes is a healthier diet than one that isn't."

    Some nice features aside from the recipes: a section on key ingredients that one needs in the kitchen, required equipment for cooking, various kitchen techniques (how to sharpen knives, different ways of "cutting" with knives, measuring, different methods of cooking (e.g., steaming, sautéing, braising, etc.). Then, on to recipes.

    Recipes are grouped in the following categories: salads; soups; eggs, dairy, and cheese; produce (vegetables and fruits); pasta, noodles, and dumplings; grains; legumes; tofu, veggie burgers, and other high-protein food; breads, pizzas, sandwiches, and wraps; sauces, condiments, herbs, and spices; desserts. Obviously, there are too many different categories to go into great detail in each. Following, a set of recopies that look interesting (and doable) to me. I hope to try some of these out in the near future (confession: I am not a vegetarian, but I am a "flexitarian").

    Salads: Carrot salad with cumin. Nice look to it--carrots, orange juice, lemon juice, olive oil, pepper, and--most interesting to me--cumin. Pretty simple to make and it looks tasty. Soup: I recently made potato and leek soup using another cookbook. This one has a somewhat different recipe that looks worth trying out. One nice aspect of this cookbook well exemplified by this dish: Bittman provides alternatives variations. In this case, that includes how to make this into Vichyssoise, Vegan Vichyssoise, and Korean style potato and leek soup.

    Produce: Roasted or grilled asparagus. Very simple recipe, but I love asparagus, so any recipes are welcome at my home! Asparagus, olive oil (extra virgin), salt, and lemon wedges. What could be easier? Broccoli Roman style: Unlike George H. W. Bush, I love broccoli! Whether raw or cooked or done any other way! Pasta: Pasta with broccoli (my bias shows again, regarding broccoli). Legumes: Vegetarian chili con carne (depending for its power on hot chili). Burger: Spicy autumn vegetable burger. Key ingredients: Kale, cannellini, extra virgin olive oil, sweet potato, bread crumbs, cinnamon, nutmeg, pinch of cayenne). Sounds yummy to me!

    So, bottom line, a nice cookbook. The recipes tend to be pretty straightforward. If interested in more vegetarian eating, this would be one nice volume to explore.

  • ·Karen·
    Apr 30, 2011

    Everything? EVERYTHING!

    No luscious photographs, but useful illustrations of techniques. This is a reference work that assumes (quite rightly in our case) that you are prepared to make that little bit of effort and make your own tortellini, wonton skins, kombu dashi, chapatis - ooh and a recipe for dosas, luv'em, and even how to make cheese. But Bittman aims at those who are unfamiliar with basic cooking techniques too, with fine drawings that show what to do with a green pepper, or a tomato, for

    Everything? EVERYTHING!

    No luscious photographs, but useful illustrations of techniques. This is a reference work that assumes (quite rightly in our case) that you are prepared to make that little bit of effort and make your own tortellini, wonton skins, kombu dashi, chapatis - ooh and a recipe for dosas, luv'em, and even how to make cheese. But Bittman aims at those who are unfamiliar with basic cooking techniques too, with fine drawings that show what to do with a green pepper, or a tomato, for example. A little obvious perhaps, but invaluable when it comes to How to Deal with an Artichoke. This is the kind of cookbook that gives you confidence to experiment: the basic method is given and then suggestions for creative variations on a theme. This is perhaps what is essential for those of us who were brought up on a fairly traditional meat-and-two-veg diet; beyond dal I never had many ideas of what to do with legumes, or grains other than rice. And there is a whole section on salsas and dips and pickles to whizz up rapidly and add a bit of pizazz to the palate.

    I like his ethos. When writing of yoghourt: "I want whole milk, I want active cultures, and I want no thickeners. (But use low-fat if you must)" - he has an excellent section on bread making - "What you don't want is a bread machine" (too right you don't) - and takes away a lot of the mystique that surrounds yeast dough and bread making. As he says, you can produce very good bread straight away and get 90 per cent down the road to great bread in a season of bread making. "The last 10 per cent is the hardest, and, except for a couple of great home bakers I know, few of us make it there." And admits that he has not. Lucky for me then, that I have a tame great bread maker here at home and sourdough permanently lurking in the fridge.

    There are plenty of ideas for the less ambitious or for those short of time, and there is a handy system that marks the recipes that are quick, that can be made ahead, that are vegan.

    The only slight disadvantage to this kind of extremely tasty home-cooked vegetarian food is that it spoils you for going out for a meal. The only kind of restaurant I've ever been to where I would really prefer the veggie choice is Indian: otherwise the non-meat alternatives are often bland and unappealing. Maybe pizza, and some pasta dishes at the Italian. We're not dogmatically vegetarian, we just avoid meat as much as possible (and much is possible). But most non-veggie restaurants here tend to just pay lip service to those who would rather not eat the flesh of dead animals, and offer a melee of over-cooked vegetables with cheese sauce from a packet over the top. Or you can have the salad, madame, we can serve it without the shredded ham. So then all that's left is tasteless iceberg and a bit of woolly tomato. But if we give in and have the meat or fish, then there's no incentive for the restaurants to improve the alternatives, is there?

  • Phillippa Wightman
    Jun 18, 2011

    My boyfriend and I religiously cook from this book - we have used it for seven meals this weekend already!

    It's winter here so rather than go out for dinner we invite our friends to come over for some vegetarian fare. As a rule all recipes come from this book.

    They say that when you have guests you never cook something that you haven't made before. Well we have broken this rule and every dish we make is a first for us, we typically make an entree, main and desert. Our guests seem impressed and t

    My boyfriend and I religiously cook from this book - we have used it for seven meals this weekend already!

    It's winter here so rather than go out for dinner we invite our friends to come over for some vegetarian fare. As a rule all recipes come from this book.

    They say that when you have guests you never cook something that you haven't made before. Well we have broken this rule and every dish we make is a first for us, we typically make an entree, main and desert. Our guests seem impressed and they usually have 'seconds' - they are not vegetarians so surely that is a good sign!!!!

    On one occasion we made devilled eggs for an entree, the eggs were pre boiled and we all sat at the table and prepared them - not typical but well received.

    This book is our cooking bible and is great for when you are stuck for ideas or just need a bit of guidance. I love that there is a base recipe and then several options - sometimes you just end up throwing in lots of bits and pieces as the book basically says that is ok.

    I have just made leek and potato soup for lunch, now what's for dinner?!

  • Carol
    Jan 20, 2014

    If I had to choose one vegetarian book to own or to give someone thinking about starting a vegetarian lifestyle, this would be it.

    The title says it all!

  • Varied Books
    Feb 10, 2017

    2/10/17 on sale for $3.99.