The Last Harvest

The Last Harvest

“I plead the blood.”Those were the last words seventeen-year-old golden boy quarterback Clay Tate heard rattling from his dad's throat when he discovered him dying on the barn floor of the Neely Cattle Ranch, clutching a crucifix to his chest. Now, on the first anniversary of the Midland, Oklahoma slaughter, the whole town's looking at Clay like he might be next to go over...

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Title:The Last Harvest
Author:Kim Liggett
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:304 pages

The Last Harvest Reviews

  • Edith
    Jun 04, 2014

    I got to read some early pages of The Last Harvest at a workshop with the author, and I am hooked! Clay is a character you want to follow, and I'm so curious to learn more about what is going on in his creepy Oklahoma town. The writing really draws you in, and the mystery is nicely laid out to keep you turning the pages. If only I'd had more pages to turn!! Can. Not. Wait. to read the rest!

  • K
    Jun 08, 2014

    ARE YOU FREAKING KIDDING ME COULD A BOOK BE MORE TAILOR MADE FOR ME

  • Lee Kelly
    Jul 27, 2014

    World, get ready for this book.

  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    Jan 08, 2017

    1) She writes about really creepy shit going down in large, ominous crop settings; and 2) She does a 

    good job of it.

    Instead of trying to "review" a book with a ton of potential to spoil stuff, I am going to ask myself questions about it and then answer them for you! See, horror and I don't always mix. I 

    to like them

    1) She writes about really creepy shit going down in large, ominous crop settings; and 2) She does a 

    good job of it.

    Instead of trying to "review" a book with a ton of potential to spoil stuff, I am going to ask myself questions about it and then answer them for you! See, horror and I don't always mix. I 

    to like them, but I feel like there is a fine line, probably more so than in any other genre, that can make a book go from creepy to eye-rolling in no time. So these are the things that I look for in books like this, and maybe you do too!

    Did I Connect to the Characters?

    Was the atmosphere on point?

    Was I kept guessing?

    Was it 

    unbelievable?

    Bottom Line:

  • Erin Arkin
    Dec 27, 2016

    The Last Harvest by Kim Liggett is described as Friday Night Lights meets Rosemary’s Baby and because of that, I was immediately intrigued. After reading, I have to say it leans more toward Rosemary’s Baby and the only tie to Friday Night Lights I could see was that the main character was at one time the popular quarterback. Even with that in mind the story that Liggett created was an interesting one.

    Clay is the main character and he has been dealing with a lot since his father died a year ago.

    The Last Harvest by Kim Liggett is described as Friday Night Lights meets Rosemary’s Baby and because of that, I was immediately intrigued. After reading, I have to say it leans more toward Rosemary’s Baby and the only tie to Friday Night Lights I could see was that the main character was at one time the popular quarterback. Even with that in mind the story that Liggett created was an interesting one.

    Clay is the main character and he has been dealing with a lot since his father died a year ago. He is the oldest and that means he is the one who has taken on the responsibility of keeping things going since his mom hasn’t been the same ever since. Clay has two younger sisters, Jess and Noodle, and he is doing everything he can to keep his family together (including harvesting the wheat before the first freeze) and providing them with the things they need but with the anniversary of his father’s death, things are getting weird and he doesn’t know who to trust.

    Clay’s family was one of the founding families of Midland, Oklahoma and along with 5 other families in town, they make up a group called the Preservation Society. The group is most recently led by a group of people that Clay goes to school with, including Ali, the girl he has had feelings for. Clay has done his best to avoid the group and the founding families but something happens one day while he is out on the combine that he can’t explain and he ends up drawn to the Neely farm where he sees something even more disturbing.

    Liggett does a fantastic job of setting up this story and the setting is perfect. First, the small town setting is perfect for this story because it creates a weird vibe. Not only is Clay going through a major life event over the last year but he saw something with his dad that day that he doesn’t really understand. As the story moves forward, pieces are revealed that start to tie what happened with his dad to the things that Clay is facing today. There were some parts that were especially creepy and I appreciated how Liggett was able to set them up.

    The characters in this story were quite interesting and definitely creepy. Of course, there is Clay and at times he seems completely clueless but I sympathize as it was really hard to figure out who to trust in this book. Just when he started to think someone would be able to help him out, something would happen that had me wondering whose side they were really on. I loved how much he cared about his family though and how willing he was to do whatever he could for them.

    The characters that make up the society and go to school with Clay were mostly there to tie Clay to the group and the rest of the story. Ali and Tyler were the most prominent of the group. Tyler was Clay’s rival and when Clay stepped back from football and the group, he is the one who stepped in to fill the void…which included Ali. Clearly they didn’t get along.

    Ali was interesting because she definitely had feelings for Clay but because of the society, she wasn’t allowed to talk to him or be around him as long as he kept his distance. When things turn around for them, they both admit their feelings and this eventually leads to the rest of the story. I have to admit, I didn’t fully see what was going to happen so kudos to Liggett for the successful twist.

    Overall I enjoyed this book. Liggett does a fantastic job of setting up the reader to try to figure things out right alongside Clay from the very first page and I appreciated that what was really going on wasn’t completely transparent. If you are looking for something that has that creepy horror movie vibe and will keep you guessing on what will really happen, consider checking this one out. I will definitely be looking forward to whatever Liggett decides to share with us next.

    Thank you to the publisher for the review copy.

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    Jan 08, 2017

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    Well, Kim Liggett sure doesn’t mess around. That was my first thought after finishing The Last Harvest, but only once I was recovered from feeling like I was thrown off a bridge thanks to that ending. This book might be published under a Young Adult imprint, but when it comes to delivering horror, it’s the real deal—no kid gloves here. To give fair warning, I would probably place this on the “older teen” spectrum, and if y

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    Well, Kim Liggett sure doesn’t mess around. That was my first thought after finishing The Last Harvest, but only once I was recovered from feeling like I was thrown off a bridge thanks to that ending. This book might be published under a Young Adult imprint, but when it comes to delivering horror, it’s the real deal—no kid gloves here. To give fair warning, I would probably place this on the “older teen” spectrum, and if you don’t like unsettling themes and endings, then you may want to stay away.

    If, however, knowing all that only makes you more intrigued, then read on! Personally, I knew as soon as I heard about The Last Harvest that it would be right up my alley. The book was first pitched to me as a YA horror thriller, described as Rosemary’s Baby meets Friday Night Lights. Think sprawling wheat fields, high school football, cattle ranches and satanic panic. No way could I resist.

    Our story is set in rural Oklahoma, starring eighteen-year-old protagonist Clay Tate. A year ago, Clay had it all—he was the star quarterback at Midland High, and as a scion of one of the six founding families of their town, he was also a well-respected member of the Preservation Society. But all that changed the night Clay’s dad lost his mind, took the living room crucifix off the wall, and made a sudden visit to Ian Neely’s neighboring cattle ranch. Now on the first anniversary of that night, people in town still talk in hushed whispers about how the elder Tate’s body was found among the blood and viscera on the floor of the breeding barn, after committing an unspeakable act. Clay himself has become a social pariah, having quit the football team and turned down his position on the Preservation Society in order to focus on working the family farm. Clay’s mom has also not yet recovered from her husband’s death, leaving him to raise his little sisters on his own.

    With the days growing cooler, Clay is determined to finish harvesting the wheat before first frost. But between the bad memories and his worries about his family, he’s been having trouble sleeping, and the visits to the doctor and school counselor haven’t really helped. Worse, he begins to see and hear things that he suspects aren’t really there, like the slaughtered golden calf he finds in the wheat field one morning, only to come back later to find that all traces of it has disappeared. Disturbing visions featuring his family and friends continue to haunt him, making Clay wonder if he is now suffering from the same mental illness that affected his dad in his final days. Was this what made his old man go crazy and accuse the Preservation Society of devil worship? Clay knows something rotten is definitely going on in the town, but there are few whom he could trust to tell the truth of what he’s seen. Evil has come to Midland, and now Clay fears for his family and for the soul of the girl he loves.

    I’ve always said, the best and scariest horror stories are the ones that make you wonder what’s real and what’s not as you’re reading. What I found most impressive about The Last Harvest was how Liggett managed to lure me into a false sense of security. She’s also good at playing her cards close to her vest. When the book begins and we meet Clay Tate, we’re aware that something bad has happened to his family and that it involves his late father, but details behind the “breeding barn incident” aren’t revealed until later. For a long time, it doesn’t appear that anything too out of the ordinary has been happening in Midland. It’s a very traditional town where everyone knows each other. Much of life revolves around church, football, and the Preservation Society. Like any population, the vast majority are good kind people, but they also have their bad eggs. So at the first signs of malaise, it didn’t set off any alarm bells in my head. Also, while a young man in his late teens experiencing the classic symptoms of schizophrenia is a distressing experience indeed, again there are no clear signs that anything supernatural may be afoot.

    It’s not until later on in the book that Liggett springs her trap. And that was when it hit me, I really should have been paying more attention! The author had been laying down clues since the very beginning, planting the seeds for her very own harvest, and suddenly it was all coming together. At the same time, I realized Liggett had set the story up so brilliantly that I had no idea where it was going to take me. In the end, I had to give up on trying to predict anything and simply let myself to be swept away by the plot’s many twists and turns—and believe me when I say, it was worth it.

    My only issue with the book is the polarizing effect it may have on its intended audience. The horror aspects are definitely intense, going a little beyond what I would have expected for a YA novel, but at the same time the story also contains clear YA genre elements including teen romance, high school drama, and a general atmosphere of teenage angst. For adult fans of horror, this might be a turnoff or even a deal breaker, and it’s a real shame because I know plenty of horror buffs for whom this book would be perfect, except they don’t read YA.

    I can also see readers divided on their thoughts of the ending, though personally, I loved it. Revealing much more about it will be spoiling, so just take my word for it when I say it is not to be missed. The Last Harvest surprised the hell out of me, and it was everything I wanted plus a lot more.

  • Elle ✦ Pretty Little Books ✦
    Jan 12, 2017

    January 10, 2017

    Young Adult Horror

    The Last Harvest falls well within the young adult horror genre and incorporates vivid evil that is sure to give readers goosebumps. Having enjoyed the authors debut novel,

    , I was very much looking forward to reading this one. Unfortunately, it didn’t necessarily hit me in the gut like her former book, but was still good none the less. I think this may be because I really couldn’t connect with the storyline, although I did

    January 10, 2017

    Young Adult Horror

    The Last Harvest falls well within the young adult horror genre and incorporates vivid evil that is sure to give readers goosebumps. Having enjoyed the authors debut novel,

    , I was very much looking forward to reading this one. Unfortunately, it didn’t necessarily hit me in the gut like her former book, but was still good none the less. I think this may be because I really couldn’t connect with the storyline, although I did find it to be very creepy. Now, this is not to say that I didn’t like the book because I did. I just didn’t love it and I probably wouldn’t come back to it in the future. With that being said, fans of young adult horror novels (especially those that prefer gore over things that go bump in the night) may like this one much better than I did. Readers who also enjoy books that dive into satanic rituals, good vs. evil, and odd characters that clearly have something wrong with them (in terms of evil inside) will enjoy this one. The ending, which was certainly my favorite part of the book, will also surprise you (and probably satisfy you as it is unlike regular endings where the evil is trumped).

    3.5 stars

  • Tammy
    Jan 09, 2017
  •  Charlie - A Reading Machine
    Feb 22, 2017

    This reads so much like a 90’s slasher movie it’s worth pulling out the popcorn and turning the lights off. It’s good fun, does not take itself too seriously and invokes a lot of those Exorcist feels. A lot of this will be new and fresh for the younger audience it’s aimed at and with a dash of sex, some high school football and a bit of drug use, it certainly ticks some of the traditional genre specific boxes as well as some new ones.

    Last Harvest starts with a few mysteries a year after a major

    This reads so much like a 90’s slasher movie it’s worth pulling out the popcorn and turning the lights off. It’s good fun, does not take itself too seriously and invokes a lot of those Exorcist feels. A lot of this will be new and fresh for the younger audience it’s aimed at and with a dash of sex, some high school football and a bit of drug use, it certainly ticks some of the traditional genre specific boxes as well as some new ones.

    Last Harvest starts with a few mysteries a year after a major and bloody event involving Clay Tate. It’s left to us to guess what exactly his father did that now makes Clay and his remaining family pariah’s in the community, what Clay did at the football game a day later that makes him dangerous and unpredictable and what role the strange Preservation Society plays in all the shit going down in this rural small town. You just know they are dodgy as hell and not to be trusted and thankfully the author does not spend any time creating “Oh I was wrong they are lovely people” type moments to try to throw us off.

    Clay is our protagonist and must deal with being responsible for his two younger sisters and slightly mad mother as well as the farm they all live on. His dream is to get his youngest sister Noodle out of the small town and into a bigger and more ambitious school. Beyond that it is one step at a time especially as he copes with the tangles of his first love being part of the spooky society, his other younger sister turning goth and hanging out with the wrong sort of kids and the possibility that he is communing with the devil unintentionally.

    The writing maintains a good pace throughout and I found it very easy to read, finishing it in two days over three sittings. It’s pretty straightforward and the twists are nice with the finale being particularly satisfying in terms of both fulfilling and surprising the reader’s expectations.

    At the end of the day I always judge a horror novel by whether it made my heart beat faster and whilst there was certainly some very horrific things happening in this book I don’t know that I ever felt so caught up that I was afraid. There were shocking moments of gore, brutal and bloody sacrifice and the final sprint was a blast but overall it just didn’t quite spook me. If you are after a teen thriller with a bit of spunk go ahead but if you are trying to really scare yourself I’d say your search will continue.

    6.5/10

    For this and other reviews please check out

  • Bookwraiths
    Feb 23, 2017

    Originally reviewed at

    .

    My rating is 3.5 stars.

    Teenagers. Wheat fields. Gruesome deaths. Devil Worship. All those ingredients mix into one terrifying brew under the masterful guidance of Kim Liggett.

    truly a horror story from Tor Teen which will creep out even the most mature reader.

    Everything changed for Clay Tate a year ago. The day when his father died a mysterious and brutal death at their neighbor’s cattle ranch. The grizzly remains of slaughter all around, a cru

    Originally reviewed at

    .

    My rating is 3.5 stars.

    Teenagers. Wheat fields. Gruesome deaths. Devil Worship. All those ingredients mix into one terrifying brew under the masterful guidance of Kim Liggett.

    truly a horror story from Tor Teen which will creep out even the most mature reader.

    Everything changed for Clay Tate a year ago. The day when his father died a mysterious and brutal death at their neighbor’s cattle ranch. The grizzly remains of slaughter all around, a crucifix clutched to his chest, and the only words he would speak before life left him the ominous “

    Before that moment, Clay had it all: star quarterback of the high school football team, friends, and a place among the prestigious “Preservation Society.” But once stories of his father’s death reached the other members of Clay’s small, rural Oklahoma community everything changed.

    Now, Clay is a social pariah. Gone are the football games and the meetings of the Preservation Society. His friends have distanced themselves from him. The girl he has feelings for ignores him. And home life is no better. Clay’s mom unable to run the family farm alone, causing her son to take on his father’s responsibilities and help care for the rest of the family. All of this combining to weigh down Clay with a heavy burden, one he does his best to accept and deal with, hoping against hope that time will erase what his father’s death has brought him.

    Eventually, things begin to . . . get even worse.

    Strange things start to happen after the one year anniversary of his father’s death. Clay begins to hear voices. Sibilant whispering which keep repeating “

    ” over and over again. Dead livestock appear in the fields — then vanish. Members of the Preservation Society start dying. A trusted school counselor even hints to Clay that the devil is coming to their small town. And our brave teenager begins to wonder if he is slowly slipping into madness like his father before him!

    What can Clay do?

    With evil lose in town and Clay’s fear that it threatens all he loves, the young man does the only thing he knows to do: Solve the mystery of his father’s death!

    Told in first person from Clay Tate’s point-of-view, this narrative does an amazing job of keeping a reader guessing from beginning to end. Liggett effortlessly dropping clues (true and false ones) all around. One minute, she will be leading a reader straight down the path before BAM! . . . the proverbial rug is pulled out from under you, taking things in a completely unexpected direction. Helpful characters quickly become creepy. Horrifying scenes graphically appear only to be explained away as possible psychotropic delusions. All the confusion filling the narrative with never ending suspense and cover-to-cover creepiness. Exactly what every horror story hopes to accomplish, but which

    delivers.

    Like other reviewers, the only negative I have with the novel is the ending. There isn’t anything wrong with it, since it has been thoroughly set up throughout the narrative (If you have been paying close attention to the clues, that is.), yet it is certainly unexpected, startling, a little unsatisfying, and left me with the feeling that nothing was really resolved. Certainly, not everyone will feel this way about the conclusion, but I did, which is why I mention it.

    is a young adult horror which won’t disappoint fans of the genre, delivering enough mystery, creepiness, and gore to make most readers take a bit longer to fall asleep after they turn the light out at bedtime.

    I received an advanced reading copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. I’d like to thank them for allowing me to receive this review copy and inform everyone that the review you have read is my opinion alone.