The Women of Easter: Encounter the Savior with Mary of Bethany, Mary of Nazareth, and Mary Magdalene

The Women of Easter: Encounter the Savior with Mary of Bethany, Mary of Nazareth, and Mary Magdalene

This Season of Grace, Deepen Your Faith in God Who So Loved the World that He Gave Us His Son.You re about to meet three women named Mary, each of whom has a life-changing encounter with Jesus. Mary of Bethany prepares the way for the Lord s burial when she anoints His feet and fills the air with her perfume. His mother, Mary of Nazareth, remains by His side from His first...

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Title:The Women of Easter: Encounter the Savior with Mary of Bethany, Mary of Nazareth, and Mary Magdalene
Author:Liz Curtis Higgs
Rating:
ISBN:1601426836
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:224 pages

The Women of Easter: Encounter the Savior with Mary of Bethany, Mary of Nazareth, and Mary Magdalene Reviews

  • Michelle
    Nov 29, 2016

    Liz Curtis Higgs does it every time. I love her books! This book is fantastic. Verse by verse, Higgs breaks down the stories in the Bible starting with Mary of Bethany. My favorite part about how this book is set up is how detailed and thought provoking it is. I have read these passages in scripture numerous times. Then Liz starts breaking it down and talking about what life was really like and the culture and the dress etc. She doesn't add to the Bible and she doesn't take away. She simply stat

    Liz Curtis Higgs does it every time. I love her books! This book is fantastic. Verse by verse, Higgs breaks down the stories in the Bible starting with Mary of Bethany. My favorite part about how this book is set up is how detailed and thought provoking it is. I have read these passages in scripture numerous times. Then Liz starts breaking it down and talking about what life was really like and the culture and the dress etc. She doesn't add to the Bible and she doesn't take away. She simply states the verse and goes, okay now do you see what really just happened here?

    So good. Five stars.

    "I received this book from Blogging for Books for free. All opinions are my own."

  • Amy
    Mar 06, 2017

    4.5 stars, really. If you have ever wondered whether women were important in Biblical times, this will give you your answer... a powerful yes. This is so insightful about the Marys who followed Jesus without question and whom He loved enough to honor them in a variety of ways. A good pre-Easter read!

  • Jill Stanish
    Jan 02, 2017

    The premise for the book intrigued me: a book about three Biblical women named Mary. What struck me was Higgs similarity in writing to Max Lucado's style--down to earth, plain speaking thoughts.

    I wanted to like this book. Wanted it to be something that would help me look at Easter in a fresh new way. Unfortunately, I could not get past the first chapter for several reasons.

    What immediately struck me was the amount of end notes in each chapter. Chapter one had over forty. If you have just a few s

    The premise for the book intrigued me: a book about three Biblical women named Mary. What struck me was Higgs similarity in writing to Max Lucado's style--down to earth, plain speaking thoughts.

    I wanted to like this book. Wanted it to be something that would help me look at Easter in a fresh new way. Unfortunately, I could not get past the first chapter for several reasons.

    What immediately struck me was the amount of end notes in each chapter. Chapter one had over forty. If you have just a few sources of reference, I can appreciate an end note but when you are over ten, it's annoying for a reader to have to continually flip to the end of the chapter to find out who is actually the source of a particular idea. After two dozen notations, I was beginning to feel like Higgs was just compiling a reference on other people's works. Sentences would have partial phrases quoted--why not just assimilate their points into her own words?

    Another annoyance was the fact that she would sometimes just cite a phrase within a verse, not the entire verse. And instead of having an in text reference, it would be in the end notes. I think it's imperative that Scripture be immediately identified as such, not up to the reader to go dig at the end of the chapter to see the reference.

    Thirdly, the author quoted more translations than I have ever seen in one book. Copyright page says most are from NIV but in the first few pages, readers are hit with several others. I've been a Christian for over 30 years and some of the abbreviated versions I had never heard of. And I could not find anywhere in the book where there was a list of what the abbreviations stand for. Yes, one could look them up, but that seems like an unnecessary burden.

    And finally, once verses were quoted from The Message and The Voice, I knew the book was not for me. Those may be fine for personal reading but it made me cringe to see them included as the basis for her points.

    I guess if a reader can get past those things, it may be an insightful book. But when a book is largely a collection of a variety of ideas, I'd prefer to just read the individual works in their entirety.

    Disclaimer: I received a free copy of The Women of Easter from Blogging for Books for the purpose of review. No other compensation was received.

  • Kelly Hodgkins
    Jan 17, 2017

    I knew this would be good, its Liz Curtis Higgs and she paints pictures with words, but wow, this one really spoke to my heart. Through the eyes of the women around Jesus before, during and after the crucifixion, I gained a new perspective of this amazing story. I relate to the gift God gives to us better now, I understand better why He chose who He did to be where He wanted them when He did and I perceive the disciples differently, I'm more empathetic. I love this book, I'll read it again befor

    I knew this would be good, its Liz Curtis Higgs and she paints pictures with words, but wow, this one really spoke to my heart. Through the eyes of the women around Jesus before, during and after the crucifixion, I gained a new perspective of this amazing story. I relate to the gift God gives to us better now, I understand better why He chose who He did to be where He wanted them when He did and I perceive the disciples differently, I'm more empathetic. I love this book, I'll read it again before Easter and probably again after that. It brings scripture to life and directs back to scripture which allows for introspection, time with the Holy Spirit and transformation. Along the journey, Liz brings her light, joy and humor! Highly Recommended!

    I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

  • Sarah Tummey
    Mar 23, 2017

    I bought this thinking it was a 40-day Lent devotional; it wasn't. However, I'm still happy I bought it because the 8 chapters make for a great read. If I was buying an Easter present for everybody, this would be it. If I was reading it again, I'd probably start it the Thursday before Palm Sunday and read a chapter a day. Then I'd finish the Thursday before Easter and have those events fresh in my mind through the weekend.

  • kathy
    Mar 05, 2017

    I wanted to read this book in preparation for Easter. I loved it! I like the focus on the women of Easter. The author's writing is understandable. I took a chapter here & there to just let it soak in. I have read many of her books & always come away spiritually refreshed!

  • Janet
    Mar 12, 2017

    I enjoyed this book about the women of Easter.

    Liz did a great job narrating the book.

  • Cheryl Baranski
    Mar 08, 2017

    The Women of Easter: Encounter the Savior with Mary of Bethany, Mary of Nazareth, and Mary Magdalene by Liz Curtis Higgs. This is a moving book that will have you wanting to learn more. I for one have never studied the people of the bible like I should have. This book has made it so much easier for me to get to know the women of the bible. It helped to open my eyes more about their significant impact in the bible. A great read. I received a complimentary copy of this book. This review is my hone

    The Women of Easter: Encounter the Savior with Mary of Bethany, Mary of Nazareth, and Mary Magdalene by Liz Curtis Higgs. This is a moving book that will have you wanting to learn more. I for one have never studied the people of the bible like I should have. This book has made it so much easier for me to get to know the women of the bible. It helped to open my eyes more about their significant impact in the bible. A great read. I received a complimentary copy of this book. This review is my honest opinion. 4 stars!

  • Michele Morin
    Mar 13, 2017

    Join the Women of Easter

    Some were mentioned by name.

    Others were never identified, but throughout the life of Jesus, we learn that there were “certain women” who traveled with Jesus, who welcomed Him when he needed a meal or a place to stay, who “provided for Him out of their means.” It is significant that there is no record in Scripture of any of these women flagging in their loyalty, denying Jesus, or abandoning Him when the chips were down. A group of them were present at the cross, and then,

    Join the Women of Easter

    Some were mentioned by name.

    Others were never identified, but throughout the life of Jesus, we learn that there were “certain women” who traveled with Jesus, who welcomed Him when he needed a meal or a place to stay, who “provided for Him out of their means.” It is significant that there is no record in Scripture of any of these women flagging in their loyalty, denying Jesus, or abandoning Him when the chips were down. A group of them were present at the cross, and then, without even realizing the significance of their actions at the time, certain women showed up at the tomb and bore witness to the resurrected Christ.

    It was clear that God had chosen them to be there.

    Liz Curtis Higgs honors The Women of Easter with her carefully constructed re-telling of the final weeks of Jesus’ life. Liz focuses on Mary of Bethany, Mary of Nazareth, and Mary Magdalene, but also shares the stories of other women as they meander across history’s stage. Rather than lifting her protagonists out of the story one by one with three distinct bios, she considers them in context as they interact with each other, with Jesus, and with other major players within the narrative arc of Scripture.

    With her characteristic humor, insight, and thorough research, Liz shares powerful wisdom from the lives of first-century women that (if we let it!) will impact the way we follow Christ in the 21st century, because, the truth is that you can spot a Woman of Easter by the way she lives:

    Women of Easter are transformed by seeking what is “needful.”

    Mary of Bethany understood that there is a time for bustling around and being productive — and there is a time for quietly listening. Big Sister Martha must have eventually absorbed some of that lesson along the way, because when their brother Lazarus died, “she who served the food also dished out the truth: “It is for Your coming, [Jesus,] that the world has waited.” God had chosen one of His faithful women to make the bold proclamation that Jesus’ decisive “I am” was a revelation of His identity. Martha’s response was a resounding, “Yes, I see that YOU ARE!”

    Women of Easter recognize that Jesus endured the cross because we were “the joy set before Him.”

    Mary of Bethany understood that when she anointed Jesus’ feet with valuable oil, she was performing an act of worship. John 12 informs us that “Martha served” that day, and so together, the sisters showed up and met a need in preparation for Jesus’ future act of redemption which, at the time, they could have only dimly understood.

    All our worship and all our acts of righteousness flow from the cross. Just as Jesus took joy in the small gift of a widow, He sees our small gifts, and He rejoices, calling them “good.”

    Women of Easter know when to stand back and watch Jesus at work.

    Mary of Nazareth (Jesus’ mother) shows up in quiet maturity at the Wedding in Cana, and she set the stage for her Son to perform the first of many signs “through which He revealed His glory; and His disciples believed in Him.” Scripture does not record Jesus saying, “Thanks, mum!” but actions speak louder than words, for while He was hanging on the cross in agony, He made provision for her future by asking John to take her into his home.

    While four soldiers cast lots for Jesus’ clothing, four women stood with Him in quiet support: Mary, Mary’s sister (possibly Salome?), Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. These women were standing on a risky piece of real estate, for the Romans were not above inflicting the same terrible punishment upon families of an enemy of the state who was being crucified. With Jesus’ feet only about a yard above the ground, these women were witnessing His suffering close by — and even so, Jesus was utterly alone in His anguish. It could not have been an easy vigil for these brave women, but they kept watch while Jesus shook hell’s gates.

    Women of Easter stay close to Jesus even when hope seems gone.

    While there is no Scriptural evidence that Mary Magdalene was actually a harlot, the Bible does inform us that Jesus cast seven demons out of her. Her background is . . . challenging, perhaps; nonetheless, she “is mentioned by name fourteen times across all four gospel accounts.” Loyal, fearless, and willing to do whatever she needed to do to support her beloved Teacher, Mary Magdalene showed up at the garden tomb, not really sure how she was going to achieve her goal of rolling away a huge stone in order to attend to Jesus’ body. My take-away from this is that when we show up for the impossible, we might be surprised at how God takes care of the details.

    Women of Easter realize that it’s all about relationship.

    Our first-century sisters didn’t realize that they were going to be eye-witnesses to the most important event in history. They came to the tomb to attend to the dead body of a much-loved friend/relative and found a living, breathing Savior! Then, having been commissioned by the risen Christ to share the good news, Mary Magdalene trumpeted the truth that changes everything: “I have seen the Lord!”

    Liz shares the encouraging truth that even the very first Easter was not a picture perfect affair. No. It was “full of disbelief, fear, and confusion” as even Jesus’ closest disciples struggled to absorb the truth.

    Likewise, with our Easter bonnets askew and our Resurrection Sunday dinner menus still up in the air, we are invited to come, by faith, to the empty tomb. We are invited to rejoice, and we have been charged with the privilege of sharing the good news. By faith, we, too, are The Women of Easter.

    //

    This book was provided by the publisher through Blogging for Books in exchange for my review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  • Barb
    Mar 19, 2017

    First the good: I enjoyed contemplating Holy Week through the eyes of the women in Jesus' life. The bad? There was an awful lot of supposition & imagination to connect the dots this author wants to connect. Bits and pieces of scripture from so many different translations, not sure where the original thoughts were aside from "we don't know for sure but I imagine..."

    My overall sentiment: disappointing