Loving vs. Virginia: A Documentary Novel of the Landmark Civil Rights Case

Loving vs. Virginia: A Documentary Novel of the Landmark Civil Rights Case

From acclaimed author Patricia Hruby Powell comes the story of a landmark civil rights case, told in spare and gorgeous verse. In 1955, in Caroline County, Virginia, amidst segregation and prejudice, injustice and cruelty, two teenagers fell in love. Their life together broke the law, but their determination would change it. Richard and Mildred Loving were at the heart of...

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Title:Loving vs. Virginia: A Documentary Novel of the Landmark Civil Rights Case
Author:Patricia Hruby Powell
Rating:
ISBN:1452125902
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:260 pages

Loving vs. Virginia: A Documentary Novel of the Landmark Civil Rights Case Reviews

  • Beth Parmer
    Jun 23, 2016

    An incredible read for both audiences that are familiar with the Loving's case, and those that are not. Opening with Mildred and Richard as children, readers watch their love story develop and witness the initial acts of hatred toward their relationship. Photos, illustrations and other excerpts add depth. The use of two voices throughout the book conveys the unfaltering love Mildred and Richard share despite the obstacles. A powerful book that can be used to discuss the thoughts and laws about l

    An incredible read for both audiences that are familiar with the Loving's case, and those that are not. Opening with Mildred and Richard as children, readers watch their love story develop and witness the initial acts of hatred toward their relationship. Photos, illustrations and other excerpts add depth. The use of two voices throughout the book conveys the unfaltering love Mildred and Richard share despite the obstacles. A powerful book that can be used to discuss the thoughts and laws about love in the past, as well as, where we stand today.

  • Brendon
    Aug 07, 2016

    See the original post on my blog:

    This book has a special place for me in my heart. I am a product of an interracial marriage and my own marriage is interracial as well. When I think about it, that 50 years ago, the relationships that produced my most salient identities was illegal, I am in such shock. Maybe I shouldn't be, but the 'post-racial America' myth is so perv

    See the original post on my blog:

    This book has a special place for me in my heart. I am a product of an interracial marriage and my own marriage is interracial as well. When I think about it, that 50 years ago, the relationships that produced my most salient identities was illegal, I am in such shock. Maybe I shouldn't be, but the 'post-racial America' myth is so pervasive, sometimes I can forget how recent people of color gained their civil rights (by law). Even though laws are passed, the system of racism is alive and well.

    Loving vs. Virginia: A Documentary Novel of the Landmark Civil Rights Case by Patricia Hruby Powell and beautifully illustrated by Shadra Strickland is a short retelling of the journey of Mildred and Richard Loving as they appeal their sentence against the state of Virginia. The novel is written in verse and switches back and forth between the perspective of Mildred and Richard. Their journey starts way back when they were young and talk about how they met and how they started dating. Many of the recollections detail the discrimination they face when out in public and choose many times to meet in secret to avoid it. The novel continues through the Loving's marriage in Washington D.C., their arrest in Virginia, their first trial and sentencing, their appeals, and finally the Supreme Court decision, striking down any law in the United States barring interracial marriage.

    One thing I did notice is how even though Richard, who is White, was shunned by folks in the White community, Mildred, who is Black, got the worst of the discrimination. This is not surprising to me because we see people of color disproportionally get treated worse when fighting for civil rights than White allies. While the book did not explore this in depth, I think it is important to bring up as a discourse about power dynamics in interpersonal relationships and how oppressive systems affect one person more than the other. I talk more about this later in the review.

    I really appreciated the history scattered throughout the novel, breaking up the personal narratives of the two main characters. For as much I know about the case, this timeline and attention to teaching actual fact really helped me solidify my understanding from the first ruling in Virginia to the final Supreme Court decision. In my opinion, this would be a good first entry point for someone who knows nothing or knows little about the Loving vs. Virginia case. The author explains many of the key points, but does not inundate the reader like a history text book. One piece of the story I did not know that really irked me was the response to the appeal filed in the state court in Virginia. The judge denied the appeal stating that interracial marriage should be illegal because God placed people of different races on different continents, showing that He did not want races to be mixed... Ugh. Disgusting. Mildred Loving cleverly replies, if that's true then White people should have stayed in Europe and never should have taken Black folks in the slave trade.

    Thinking about interracial marriage always makes me think of power dynamics based on race in relationships. I think this book does well with illustrating the case and how White supremacy and the myth of blood mixing contributed to the resistance to interracial marriage and overall integration. However, it does not address interpersonal power dynamics within the marriage or romantic relationship itself. I think it is hard to recognize because when we form romantic relationships and marriages, it is hard to imagine one person subjecting the other to stereotypes, unconscious bias, and even perpetuate systems of oppression, all rooted in hate and bigotry... Because we love each other. Just because two people marry, just because two people have love for one another does not exempt them from facing the ever present system of racism.

    Questions and situations flow through my head whenever I think about interracial marriage... "What do I do when my partner microagresses against me?" "What are we going to teach our children about race?" "What do I do if I am out with my partner and someone uses a racial slur at me?" "How will I be perceived by my partners family?" And so on and so on. Without getting too personal, in my experience, clear and honest communication is the best way to start expressing the intent and impact of certain situations and taking responsibility for that impact. This does not only apply to White and POC couples, but with couples each from their own marginalized communities. We are socialized within the system of colorism and we carry the baggage of White Supremacy with us. For example, I was recently reading about reasons why Asian/Pacific Islander (API) communities sometimes have a hard time support the Black community. Myths set up by the dominant culture has made Whiteness desirable and encourages API folks to strive for it. This effectively separates the two communities of color. Interracial couples will never be perfect about race because we live in a racialized society. What we can do is educate ourselves, talk about race, and recognize it as an important dynamic in the relationship.

    Overall, I really enjoyed the book and the brief history lesson with it. This is a book I would definitely own so my future children and family will remember and know the Loving family and what they did . Look for Loving vs. Virginia releasing at the end of next January, 2017.

    Final Rating: 4.1/5

  • Kelly
    Aug 22, 2016

    This verse/documentary novel explores the story of Loving vs. Virginia in a way that's accessible and engaging. The blank verse is the story of Richard and Millie falling in love and having children with one another in rural Virginia, where it was illegal for them to be married as a mixed-race couple. Throughout the book are well-designed pieces of legislation, of photographs, and of historical moments that give even more context to the fictionalized story of the real-life couple.

    What made this

    This verse/documentary novel explores the story of Loving vs. Virginia in a way that's accessible and engaging. The blank verse is the story of Richard and Millie falling in love and having children with one another in rural Virginia, where it was illegal for them to be married as a mixed-race couple. Throughout the book are well-designed pieces of legislation, of photographs, and of historical moments that give even more context to the fictionalized story of the real-life couple.

    What made this really powerful is how relevant it still is today. The last anti-miscegenation law in the US was not off the books until 2000. And this story, told through the late 50s and 60s, was not that long ago; I had a real pause when, after Richard and Millie were informed they couldn't return to their home county for 25 years, that would be 1984...which was only 31 years ago. Although interracial marriage is now legal, the same sorts of racist legislation and racism more broadly (see: the police officer in the story) hasn't gone away.

    I'll be curious how the finished book looks, since this one has a larger trim size to it than a standard novel. In some ways, that makes it more appealing, but seeing this is a novel, rather than non-fiction, it will be odd to fit into collections or stand out on the shelf as such. Will younger readers pick it up since it will look different? Will it get more attention because it does provide a real historical story in a way that's wildly accessible?

  • Ashley Urquhart
    Sep 17, 2016

    Loving vs. Viriginia was the hallmark case that overturned years of laws that made interracial marriage illegal. The story of Milly Jeter and Richard Loving is told in verse from alternating perspectives and readers will be inspired by the courage and love shown by both narrators. Milly and Richard didn’t mean to change any laws, they just wanted to live as a married couple near their families in Virginia. Unfortunately, Milly was black and Richard was white and interracial marriages were illega

    Loving vs. Viriginia was the hallmark case that overturned years of laws that made interracial marriage illegal. The story of Milly Jeter and Richard Loving is told in verse from alternating perspectives and readers will be inspired by the courage and love shown by both narrators. Milly and Richard didn’t mean to change any laws, they just wanted to live as a married couple near their families in Virginia. Unfortunately, Milly was black and Richard was white and interracial marriages were illegal in the state of Virginia. They were forced to start their young family while living in D.C., but both were miserable there. Luckily, a young lawyer believed in their case and ended up taking it all the way to the Supreme Court where they won.

    This book details a case from our not too distant history as Americans. Laws banning interracial marriage existed as late as 2000 in some places. While both Milly and Richard had passed away before the author had the chance to interview them, Powell was able to speak with several people who knew them personally. She takes their stories and creates beautiful poems out of them. At the same time, Powell also incorporates documents and quotes from the time scattered throughout the book that help the reader to establish where the Lovings fit in with the overall Civil Rights Movement. While readers may pick this book up because of the underlying “love story”, they may find themselves interested in learning more about the Civil Rights Movement and desegregation in general. While this book deals with some heavier themes, the free verse narrative is accessible to younger readers as well.

    As a reader, I really loved this book. I loved the way the author made such an impactful topic accessible and interesting to younger readers. My husband and I are a third generation interracial couple in my family. After reading this book, I found out that my grandparents (a white man and a Hispanic woman with dark skin) got married in the 60s and actually lived in the Virginia/D.C. area at the same time that the Lovings did (before the ban on interracial marriage was overturned). I’m grateful that this book prompted me to learn a little more about my own family history and I believe that it might make other readers, teens especially, interested in learning more as well.

    This book is especially timely with the new movie Loving coming out on November 4th. Teens who watch the movie may be interested in learning more about the people and the case of Loving vs. Virginia specifically. This book would be perfect for those who aren’t especially strong readers or who simply want to read a little bit more about the case without getting in too deep.

  • Richie Partington
    Oct 02, 2016

    Richie’s Picks: LOVING VS. VIRGINIA: A DOCUMENTARY NOVEL OF THE LANDMARK CIVIL RIGHTS CASE by Patricia Hruby Powell and Shadra Strickland, ill., Chronicle, February 2017, 260p., ISBN: 978-1-4521-2590-9

    “I see your true colors

    And that’s why I love you.”

    --Cyndi Lauper

    “Mr. Cohen, tell the Court I love my wife, and it is just unfair that I can’t live with her in Virginia.”

    --Richard Loving to his ACLU attorney

    Patricia Hruby Powell’s emotionally powerful verse novel LOVING VS. VIRGINIA is a satisfying

    Richie’s Picks: LOVING VS. VIRGINIA: A DOCUMENTARY NOVEL OF THE LANDMARK CIVIL RIGHTS CASE by Patricia Hruby Powell and Shadra Strickland, ill., Chronicle, February 2017, 260p., ISBN: 978-1-4521-2590-9

    “I see your true colors

    And that’s why I love you.”

    --Cyndi Lauper

    “Mr. Cohen, tell the Court I love my wife, and it is just unfair that I can’t live with her in Virginia.”

    --Richard Loving to his ACLU attorney

    Patricia Hruby Powell’s emotionally powerful verse novel LOVING VS. VIRGINIA is a satisfying true love story, in which equality and Constitutional rights triumph over prejudice and hate. This book left me with a hunger to learn more about the history of anti-miscegenation laws and other marriage-related statutes.

    One of the many virtues of this wonderful “documentary novel” is the inclusion of a wealth of important factual matter as illustrations. These include such notable visuals as the text of the Fourteenth Amendment; the juxtaposition of two damning photos showing what “separate but equal” looked like in Virginia’s public schools; white supremacist quotes by George Wallace and Harry Byrd; the text of the actual Virginia anti-miscegenation statute; a photo from the 1960 lunch counter sit-ins; a quote from Reverend King’s 1963 Letter from Birmingham Jail, and an aerial photo of the 1963 March on Washington; a photo of LBJ signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964; and quotations from the Virginia jurist’s white supremacist-grounded opinion in the Loving case which was reversed by the unanimous opinion of the U.S. Supreme Court.

    Another enlightening illustration is a map of the United States showing the states with anti-miscegenation laws in 1958, when the Lovings got married. (They married in Washington, D.C., where there were no such laws.)

    According to the map, my state of California did not have such a statute in 1958. That made me wonder whether California had ever had such a law. It turns out that in 1948, California became the first state in the nation to strike down an anti-miscegenation law, when the state Supreme Court ruled 4-3 that a ban on interracial marriage violated the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

    I also wondered about the history of laws in Virginia regarding same-sex couples, and why Virginia seems more progressive these days in comparison to some other southern states. It was interesting to learn what’s happened in a state that comes across in this book as backward and racist when these two wonderful young people fell in love in the 1950s.

    “Then blinding light right in

    my eyes.

    I’m ready to scream

    but Richard

    spooned behind me

    must have woke up

    and pulled me tight

    into his body--

    which stops the scream.

    Then a cruel voice

    right over me says,

    ‘Who’s that woman

    you’re

    sleeping with?’

    I can’t see who’s speaking

    what with the light in my

    eyes.

    He’s talking to Richard,

    of course.

    Richard says nothing--

    not sure he’s

    even truly awake.

    He just pulls me

    tighter still.

    ‘I’m his wife,’ I say.

    It makes me feel brave.

    I’m his wife.

    Richard lifts onto

    his elbow,

    takes his arm away

    from me

    to shield

    the light

    from his eyes.

    Richard points to the marriage certificate

    framed on the wall

    behind us.

    Beam of light leaves our faces

    to shine on the certificate--

    so I can see it’s Sheriff Brooks

    and two deputies--

    but I already knew that.

    ‘Not here she ain’t,’

    says the sheriff.

    ‘Come on, get dressed,

    let’s go.

    I scurry up the stairs,

    pull on yesterday’s dress.

    The whole house is awake--

    Mama, Daddy, Otha, Lewis, Garnet--

    no one says a word.

    They don’t dare.

    Mama watches me go off

    with the white men.

    Get in their car.

    Go to jail.”

    What a great story! Richard Loving, who was white, was a childhood friend of the older brothers of Mildred Jeter, who was Black. Over time, Mildred grew from being just a little sister at Richard’s friends’ house into an adolescent who Richard grew fond of and courted.

    Mildred’s siblings were supportive of the couple’s courtship, and the family was there for her and Richard through the decade during which they were in and out of jail for the crime of falling in love with someone of a different skin tone. Unfortunately, a sheriff who is a poor excuse for a human being plays an important part in the story, illustrating the cruelty of “the Southern way of life.”

    For years, the Lovings and their three children were forced to live over the border in Washington, DC, far from their families and Richard’s job. Finally they wrote to U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, seeking help. Kennedy referred them to the American Civil Liberties Union, where a young attorney spent years taking their case through the state and federal systems, all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

    At this moment, when the direction of the U.S Supreme Court hangs in the balance, LOVING VS. VIRGINIA is a powerful example of how the decisions of the High Court can personally affect millions of Americans.

    Richie Partington, MLIS

    Richie's Picks

    richiepartington@gmail.com

  • Kathy MacMillan
    Nov 28, 2016

    I received an Advance Reader's Copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    Accessible, relatable, and compelling, this book makes an important piece of history come alive. The description “documentary novel” perfectly describes this book. The bulk of the story is told in verse from the alternating points of view of Mildred and Richard Loving, with historical photographs, documents, and quotes seamlessly woven in, placing the very personal struggle of the Lovings in its larger historical c

    I received an Advance Reader's Copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    Accessible, relatable, and compelling, this book makes an important piece of history come alive. The description “documentary novel” perfectly describes this book. The bulk of the story is told in verse from the alternating points of view of Mildred and Richard Loving, with historical photographs, documents, and quotes seamlessly woven in, placing the very personal struggle of the Lovings in its larger historical context. Loose drawings by Shadra Strickland, deliberately done in the style of visual journalism used in the 1950s, illustrate the verse portions of the story. Mildred and Richard’s romance unfolds from their childhood home of Central Point, Virginia, immersed in the sensory details of blue homespun napkins and pick-up softball games, along with the everyday experience of blunt racism. As the couple falls in love, marries, and moves to Washington, D.C. to avoid being arrested for the crime of interracial marriage, it becomes clear that they never set out to become activists or heroes – they just wanted to be with their families and raise their children in peace. The nonfiction elements are a perfect touch and beautifully integrated into the story, providing context without ever drawing focus from the effects of unjust laws on the lives of real people. The backmatter details the extensive research the author undertook, including interviews with many of the couple’s friends and relatives. In our current climate, this book is even more necessary.

  • Sarah
    Dec 11, 2016

    Wow, what an eye-opening and moving account of the Lovings' struggle to live together as a married couple. It was especially interesting for me (and even more heartbreaking) to read because the locations mentioned are close to home. This is intended for an older audience than my elementary readers, so teachers of older students-- don't miss this!

  • Kelly
    Dec 15, 2016

    MILDRED

    Richard once said,

    "It could be worse, Bean.

    If you was the white one

    and I was the colored one,

    people saw us together?

    They'd lynch me.

    We can do this."

    RICHARD

    After waiting another year -

    more like fourteen months -

    they lost that case.

    Is that four now?

    They calle

    MILDRED

    Richard once said,

    "It could be worse, Bean.

    If you was the white one

    and I was the colored one,

    people saw us together?

    They'd lynch me.

    We can do this."

    RICHARD

    After waiting another year -

    more like fourteen months -

    they lost that case.

    Is that four now?

    They called for another.

    They lawyers sure are excited

    for losing.

    As its 50th anniversary approaches, the 1967 Supreme Court case

    is receiving some extra attention: from the recently released film starring Ruth Negga (forever my Annie Cresta!) and Joel Edgerton (titled simply

    ), to a mention on the ABC sitcom

    , and now a "documentary novel" written by Patricia Hruby Powell, with illustrations by Shadra Strickland.

    For those unfamiliar with the case,

    struck down the state's anti-miscegenation statute (the Racial Integrity Act of 1924) - and, by extension, similar statutes that existed in twenty-five other states - which prohibited whites from marrying outside their race. Interestingly, no such restrictions existed for non-whites, which is part of what led to the law's downfall: The Lovings' lawyers argued that the emphasis on maintaining the racial purity of whites (but not nonwhites) presupposed the superiority of the "white race," in clear violation of the 14th Amendment.

    In

    , Hruby Powell tells the story of Mildred and Richard's historic fight, from the genesis of their relationship to their victory in the Supreme Court on June 12, 1967 (a day that's now remembered as Loving Day). The couple grew up together in Central Point, Virginia; their rural neighborhood was home to people of all colors: black, white, Native American, and multiracial. (Mildred herself was light-skinned, with both African and Native American ancestry.) They socialized, shared potluck dinners, and helped each other with farm work. Despite the state's law against it, interracial relationships were not unheard of.

    Millie and Richard started dating in 1955, and two years later they had their first child, Sidney Clay. When Mildred found herself pregnant for the second time, the couple decided to get married - in nearby Washington, D.C. Just five weeks later, they were arrested in the dead of night. Sheriff Garnett Brooks and two deputies stormed into the couple's bedroom in the Jeter house and demanded of Richard, "Who's that woman you're sleeping with?" When Mildred replied that she was his wife, Brooks shot back, "Not here, she ain't."

    While Richard was released on bail the next day, they held Mildred for a week or more. (Sources seem to vary on this.) Though she was the only woman in a cell meant for many more, the conditions were substandard, and Millie's jailers threatened her, including with rape. After her release, the couple moved to D.C., where they stayed with Millie's cousin Alex and his wife Laura. They returned to Virginia in January, after baby Donald was born, where they received a one-year suspended sentence - as long as the couple never returned to the state together. For the next eight years, the Lovings found themselves shunted between Virginia and D.C., as they fought to return to their home and the case wound its way through the courts. A refrain you'll often hear repeated about them is that they never set out to make history; they just wanted to go home.

    Told in verse, from Mildred and Richard's alternating perspectives,

    is a beautiful and heartbreaking book. As with any work of historical fiction, you wonder how much is grounded in truth, and which parts are the author's invention. According to the Acknowledgements, Hruby Powell spoke to the Lovings' family and friends - including Lewis and Otha Jeter, two of Millie's seven brothers - as well as neighbors who frequented the same hangout spots, so I think it's safe to assume that much of the narrative is firmly grounded in reality.

    Though I was vaguely aware of the case, I learned a ton from

    , especially about the anti-miscegenation laws (which I had assumed banned

    interracial marriage).

    It can be all too easy to view historical events through a lens of removal or disconnect, but Hruby Powell deftly shows the impact they can have on those who live through them. Millie was very much a country girl, and her excommunication to (comparatively) dirty and crowded D.C. took a toll on her mental well-being. Meanwhile, Richard was forced to make a three hour round-trip commute to Central Point every day for work, eating up much of his time and earnings. For the better part of the decade, they lived in limbo, a state of uncertainty, anger, and hope, wishing nothing more than to be allowed back home, as a family.

    She humanizes Mildred and Richard so well, in fact, that I found it especially difficult to reconcile the couple's six-year age difference: when they first met, Millie was eleven, while Richard was seventeen. They began courting when Millie was sixteen, and she first became pregnant at seventeen. (Again, accounts seem to differ, but in the context of this story, she was seventeen.) The back matter describes this as a story about "two teenagers" who fell in love, which is ... not quite right.

    Intellectually I get that this was more acceptable back then; but emotionally, my heart still ached for seventeen-year-old Millie, unexpectedly pregnant and with no one to turn to for help. (The neighborhood midwife just so happened to be her boyfriend's mother!) I rooted for the Lovings, of course, because racism is bullshit. But I also rooted for Millie, because every girl has the right to a quality education, as well as the ability to plan their families.

    The Lovings' story is peppered with contemporary information about the civil rights movement, to help put their struggle in context, to great effect. In this vein, I wish Hruby Powell had included a page about reproductive freedom. For example, it wasn't until 1965, in

    , that the Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional for the state to prohibit married couples from using contraception. I get that the main thrust of the book is civil rights vs. women's rights, but it feels odd to gloss over this detail, especially in a book that seems geared toward MG/YA readers. Teenage pregnancy at the expense of a high school education isn't something that has to happen nowadays, not when our access to contraception has grown in leaps and bounds. (Yet, as recent events have demonstrated, is still under attack.)

    Likewise, before her death in 2008,

    :

    I would have loved to have seen some mention of this in the "afterward," which is otherwise tragic as heck: just eight years after the ruling, Richard was killed by a drunk driver. (Mildred, who was also in the car, was blinded in one eye.)

    Finally, a note on the format: Though I usually prefer ebooks to print books,

    is the rare exception. The hardcover is a feast for the eyes, handsome and thoughtfully designed.

    Hruby Powell's prose is complemented wonderfully by Strickland's illustrations, done in the style of "visual journalism."

    The book also includes historic, period photographs, for example, side-by-side images of all-white and colored schoolrooms to demonstrate the bald-faced lie of "separate but equal" education.

    While there aren't many photos of the Lovings (none exist from their childhood), Strickland does a masterful job bringing them to life in pen and ink.

    The result is a lovely and heartrending book that's needed now more than ever. ♥

  • Katie
    Dec 29, 2016

    3.5*

    The story of desegregation and the civil rights movement in the US told by focusing in particular on the case of Loving vs Virgina which declared laws preventing interracial marriages unconstitutional. The book itself tells the story of Mildred and Richard loving in verse and through illustrations. It focuses on their back story and the trials they faced as an interracial couple in the South. There are also old photographs and details of other landmark points in the civil rights movement in

    3.5*

    The story of desegregation and the civil rights movement in the US told by focusing in particular on the case of Loving vs Virgina which declared laws preventing interracial marriages unconstitutional. The book itself tells the story of Mildred and Richard loving in verse and through illustrations. It focuses on their back story and the trials they faced as an interracial couple in the South. There are also old photographs and details of other landmark points in the civil rights movement in the US. This is a beautifully produced book which I'm sure will look even better in hard copy than it did in my digital ARC copy.

    I have two major gripes - one of them comes from the format. Through telling the story through verse it meant that Hruby Powell only had a wry limited number of words with which to tell the story and this led to me wanting more detail and wanting more fleshed out and fully realised characters. The second is that both Richard and Mildred's narrative voices sound the exact same. If it wasn't for the title at the start of each chapter I likely would have struggled to work out whose point of view I was realising. This relates back to the characters not being fully realised. I realise it is a delicate balance act when you are dealing with actual people who lived and had family and friends to craft them on a page but I would have liked characters that felt more real in the book.

    I recieved a digital ARC through netgalley for review and as always my reviews are honest and unaffected by receiving a free copy.

  • Miss Fabularian
    Feb 16, 2017

    I listened to the audiobook on my library Hoopla account, and though I missed so much of Shadra's work, I loved this book, and look forward to reading the print copy.

    I saw the HBO documentary The Loving Story a few years ago, and was very moved by this unforgettable portrait of a white man, Richard Loving, and a black woman , Mildred "Millie", who loved each other and went to great lengths to get and remain married to each other in segregated Virginia. The documentary, as well as this novel, mad

    I listened to the audiobook on my library Hoopla account, and though I missed so much of Shadra's work, I loved this book, and look forward to reading the print copy.

    I saw the HBO documentary The Loving Story a few years ago, and was very moved by this unforgettable portrait of a white man, Richard Loving, and a black woman , Mildred "Millie", who loved each other and went to great lengths to get and remain married to each other in segregated Virginia. The documentary, as well as this novel, made me very emotional. The book was narrated in alternate voices. I was initially put off by Adenrele Ojo's breathy southern accent, but I adjusted. I have scoured the internet trying to find the male narrator who read Richard's voice to no avail. He was very convincing. This is a novel in verse, but you wouldn't get that impression from listening to the audiobook. The story is beautiful, fluid, and gives emotion, information, and depth. For more of this review and peek at the movie trailer