32 Yolks: From My Mother's Table to Working the Line

32 Yolks: From My Mother's Table to Working the Line

For readers of Jacques Pepin s The Apprentice and Marcus Samuelsson s Yes, Chef, here is the com.......

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Title:32 Yolks: From My Mother's Table to Working the Line
Author:Eric Ripert
Rating:
ISBN:0812992989
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:247 pages

32 Yolks: From My Mother's Table to Working the Line Reviews

  • Denise Morse
    Mar 07, 2016

    The book is an in depth look at the early formidable years of a true genius chef. It is always fascinating to read about how people become who they are, what happens in the early life to shape their thinking and their personalities. I wanted so much to go back in time and to give him a hug, i worried for him even knowing that things turn out alright. The description of working for Robuchon was so incredibly interesting. I so wanted to continue the story for after he got to Washington D.C. and le

    The book is an in depth look at the early formidable years of a true genius chef. It is always fascinating to read about how people become who they are, what happens in the early life to shape their thinking and their personalities. I wanted so much to go back in time and to give him a hug, i worried for him even knowing that things turn out alright. The description of working for Robuchon was so incredibly interesting. I so wanted to continue the story for after he got to Washington D.C. and learn more about what happens there.

  • Anne
    Apr 12, 2016

    Read it. Couldn't put it down. It was heart-breaking and amazing, and as I read it, I'd find myself thinking, there's a piece that lead to LB's genius. Loved the line about how he could tell where a chef made a mistake in a sauce because he's made every single one of them himself. But now I want more! I want what happens after he gets to America! Ripert and his co-author did an excellent job of laying out the foundations of Ripert's life and start in the kitchen. Now I want the next step.

  • Ola
    Apr 16, 2016

    This is a story of beginning of long way that Eric Ripert had to take to become an amazing chef of a three star restaurant. Reading it I had more and more admiration for all the chefs. Work in a kitchen is so difficult, so physically and mentally exhausting it amazes me that so many people decide to embark on this journey to become a professional chef. And I am than

    This is a story of beginning of long way that Eric Ripert had to take to become an amazing chef of a three star restaurant. Reading it I had more and more admiration for all the chefs. Work in a kitchen is so difficult, so physically and mentally exhausting it amazes me that so many people decide to embark on this journey to become a professional chef. And I am thankful for them, otherwise I won't be able to enjoy amazing food that I am too lazy and ignorant to prepare.

    Great memoir, a must read for all the inspiring cooks out there, be prepared to work hard, very hard. And all the foodies out there, after reading it, you will appreciate your food even more. After reading it, you will dismiss everyone that says that dishes in Michelin stared restaurant cost so much - so much effort of so many people is put into those dishes, that they are worth their price.

  • Sue Russell
    May 04, 2016

    This is really a pretty good book---better than most chef memoirs. But it's hard to know how to rate a book for which the author had "help." In this case I might add that the "help" did a very good disappearing act, so that the prose seemed natural and the food parts seemed credibly detailed. I know that I couldn't have done anywhere near as good a job in describing the various knife cuts.

  • Diane S ☔
    May 04, 2016

    I like to cook, buy the best ingredients available to me and think I am a pretty good at it. Or so my family says. But to be this caliber of a chef liking it not enough, passion os required, the passion required to cook for sixteen or more hours of a day. That I don't have the desire to do.

    Saw Chef Eric Ripert on Top Chef, plus I like reading books about food, heck I really like food. He grew up with a mother who created wonderful food, had grandmothers who also cooked well, though differently.

    I like to cook, buy the best ingredients available to me and think I am a pretty good at it. Or so my family says. But to be this caliber of a chef liking it not enough, passion os required, the passion required to cook for sixteen or more hours of a day. That I don't have the desire to do.

    Saw Chef Eric Ripert on Top Chef, plus I like reading books about food, heck I really like food. He grew up with a mother who created wonderful food, had grandmothers who also cooked well, though differently. Had an erratic home life due to his stepfather.so animosity but took to hanging around a wonderful chef who took him under his wing. He could already see his passion for food. The kitchens he worked in, the cooking academy he attended, what he learned, what he did not but later learned under some ferocious chefs. The stress he suffered. All so interesting but am glad it was not me. Couldn't have withstood the pressure he did, but admire that there are those who can.

    A very good book on the making of a chef, a chef that can cook and create in Michelin starred restaurants. Originally from Andorra and Paris, he would make his name in the states. Loved everything about this book, so interesting and insightful, a glimpse into a world and career that I knew little of.

    ARC from Netgalley.

  • Beth
    May 16, 2016

    Unlike many who would be attracted to this book, I started reading not really aware of who Eric Ripert really is. I don't generally pay attention to Michelin stars or any of that - way above my budget. But I do tend to be interested in memoirs, and as someone who collects cookbooks like some collect tchotchkes, I enjoy reading about chefs and their backgrounds and training. 32 Yolks was both interesting and compulsively readable.

    Ripert didn't have the best upbringing as a child. His parents ende

    Unlike many who would be attracted to this book, I started reading not really aware of who Eric Ripert really is. I don't generally pay attention to Michelin stars or any of that - way above my budget. But I do tend to be interested in memoirs, and as someone who collects cookbooks like some collect tchotchkes, I enjoy reading about chefs and their backgrounds and training. 32 Yolks was both interesting and compulsively readable.

    Ripert didn't have the best upbringing as a child. His parents ended up divorced, with his father dying not too long after that. His mother married a man who abused him (mentally more than physically, it appears). Not being a stellar student, he had little interest in pursuing further studies. What he *did* have, however, was a lifetime love for, and interest in, food. From the time he was small, his mother made amazing meals, complete with full service at all times. He was exposed to foods most children might never see, and decided that in the kitchen was where he needed to be. In his memoir, Ripert tells all of this as though you're sitting at a cafe, drinking espresso and having a chat. He and Veronica Chambers, who helped write this, have such an easy way of telling the story. It's actually almost helpful, that ease, particularly when you're reading the terrible details of some of the events in his life.

    Overall, it was an enjoyable, interesting read about a man who has worked his way to the pinnacle in the chef world. I wish him the best of continued success, and would certainly be interested in reading more about his life as he made his way to America.

  • Mainon
    May 20, 2016

    3.5 stars

    Eric Ripert is one of my favorite Top Chef personalities (he's both dreamy and articulate), and as I've been fortunate enough to eat at Le Bernardin a handful of times, he's also one of my favorite real-life chefs.

    His childhood was both more fraught and more privileged than I had expected. No spoilers, but I strongly sympathized with young Eric, even when he was being a bit of an entitled prat.

    The tales of his first Michelin-starred kitchen training are reminiscent of

    3.5 stars

    Eric Ripert is one of my favorite Top Chef personalities (he's both dreamy and articulate), and as I've been fortunate enough to eat at Le Bernardin a handful of times, he's also one of my favorite real-life chefs.

    His childhood was both more fraught and more privileged than I had expected. No spoilers, but I strongly sympathized with young Eric, even when he was being a bit of an entitled prat.

    The tales of his first Michelin-starred kitchen training are reminiscent of

    , and reminded me how lucky I am that even the sweatshop-style hours of BigLaw rarely demanded physical labor or emotional abuse.

    I was unpleasantly surprised, however, that this book ended pretty much on Ripert's arrival in the United States. I wanted more of his experiences adjusting to America after having spent his life in France, and to satisfy my taste for behind-the-scenes peeks into the kitchens of some of my favorite restaurants. And since we got so much about the girlfriend he left behind in France, I was curious to know more about the woman who won his heart here. But maybe he's saving all of that for a second memoir! (Is there any dish requiring 64 yolks as a follow-up?)

    I received a copy of this ebook from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

  • Lorilin
    May 24, 2016

    Eric Ripert is one of the most recognizable chefs in the world today. He makes good food. He's on Top Chef a lot. And Anthony Bourdain seems to think he's a swell guy. To top it off, he's always got that humble and composed Frenchman swagger. The guy just has it going on.

    I like Eric Ripert, and I figured I was going to enjoy this book when I first picked it up. But I wasn't expecting to be so caught up in it. I mean, I LOVED it. Start to finish, loved it. It was fun to read, and I didn't want it

    Eric Ripert is one of the most recognizable chefs in the world today. He makes good food. He's on Top Chef a lot. And Anthony Bourdain seems to think he's a swell guy. To top it off, he's always got that humble and composed Frenchman swagger. The guy just has it going on.

    I like Eric Ripert, and I figured I was going to enjoy this book when I first picked it up. But I wasn't expecting to be so caught up in it. I mean, I LOVED it. Start to finish, loved it. It was fun to read, and I didn't want it to end. Ripert has such a way with words (or is that his editor?). His love of food is so obvious and earnest, and the way he describes his dishes and their ingredients makes you feel like you are right there tasting them. I've never been a natural foodie (though I AM getting better in the kitchen...), but listening to him share how he loves food made me want to treat food better.

    What really sets this memoir apart, though, are all the personal details and feelings Ripert shares. He really puts it all out there. I had no idea that he went through so much in his life, especially during childhood. Learning about his relationship with his stepdad was heartbreaking. It's clear he has a lot of pain associated with some of the people and events he talks about, but he doesn't hide or gloss over anything. And he also doesn't lambast anyone either. Even the people who are harsh with him are treated with kindness and respect in this book, and I respect that.

    I just so, so loved this memoir. I finished it a couple days ago, but I'm still thinking about it. It resonated with me in a powerful way. I can't recommend it highly enough.

    FYI (because I can't help myself), I will add that if you like this book, you will probably like

    by Marcus Samuelsson. And if you like food-centered fiction, I'd also suggest

    .

    ARC received through Amazon Vine.

    See more of my book reviews at

  • Cathie
    Jan 28, 2017

    A must read for those aspiring chefs! What determination! What achievements!

  • Heather Colacurcio
    Sep 12, 2016

    In the heart of the most famous French kitchens, you will find a cutthroat world full of chefs trying to make their mark on the world. Eric Ripert recounts his privileged, but difficult childhood spent in the South of France and Andorra. When Ripert was only fifteen, he began culinary school and with a bright future ahead, started training in one of France's oldest, most beloved restaurants. When the opportunity struck to move even further up the ladder, Ripert jumped at the chance, not realizin

    In the heart of the most famous French kitchens, you will find a cutthroat world full of chefs trying to make their mark on the world. Eric Ripert recounts his privileged, but difficult childhood spent in the South of France and Andorra. When Ripert was only fifteen, he began culinary school and with a bright future ahead, started training in one of France's oldest, most beloved restaurants. When the opportunity struck to move even further up the ladder, Ripert jumped at the chance, not realizing the stakes. The years spent working extremely long days under the watchful (and often times physically abusive) eye of a famous French Chef paints an interesting portrait of what it takes to be truly great at a craft. Despite challenge after challenge, Riepert refuses to let his spirit and will be broken. Impossible to put down, this is a read that explores what dreams are truly made of.