Designing Your Life: Build a Life that Works for You

Designing Your Life: Build a Life that Works for You

*** The #1 New York Times Bestseller *** Whether we’re 20, 40, 60 or older, many of us are still looking for an answer to that perennial question, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ In Designing Your Life, Silicon Valley design innovators Bill Burnett and Dave Evans use their expertise to help you work out what you want – and how to get it.Their phenomenally succes...

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Title:Designing Your Life: Build a Life that Works for You
Author:William Burnett
Rating:
ISBN:1784740241
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:240 pages

Designing Your Life: Build a Life that Works for You Reviews

  • Savannah Peterson
    Sep 23, 2016

    What an excellent read! This is going to be my "Christmas of 2016" gift for friends and family. There's the reframe of a dysfunctional belief or Life Design tip for everyone inside. It's especially timely for the recent grad, the restless mid-career professional, or the encore passion seeker ready for a change.

    Admittedly, I've been a Design Thinker for awhile, so the concepts here were not too foreign to me, but the application of them for my personal life very much was. Curiosity and prototypi

    What an excellent read! This is going to be my "Christmas of 2016" gift for friends and family. There's the reframe of a dysfunctional belief or Life Design tip for everyone inside. It's especially timely for the recent grad, the restless mid-career professional, or the encore passion seeker ready for a change.

    Admittedly, I've been a Design Thinker for awhile, so the concepts here were not too foreign to me, but the application of them for my personal life very much was. Curiosity and prototyping are a crucial part of discovering what makes you happy in life, and DYL reminded me of that.

    Designing Your Life is not a manual, it's an actual toolkit with worksheets and activities for you to do on your Life Design Journey. I have already read it a few times, and know I'll be coming back for years to come.

  • Alexis
    Feb 15, 2017

    While this book offered helpful advice, I found by the end that it was difficult to read and complete the activities. As someone who works with designers (and lives with one), I found it difficult to suspend my disbelief and accept the idealized vision of designers and design thinking in this book. I don't know any designers who are as put together as this book makes it sound like they are, nor do I know any designers who actively use all the steps of "design thinking". I also found the business

    While this book offered helpful advice, I found by the end that it was difficult to read and complete the activities. As someone who works with designers (and lives with one), I found it difficult to suspend my disbelief and accept the idealized vision of designers and design thinking in this book. I don't know any designers who are as put together as this book makes it sound like they are, nor do I know any designers who actively use all the steps of "design thinking". I also found the business language (i.e. "radical collaboration", "co-creation", "reframing failure") excruciating to read, thought that many of the case study examples were idealized, and couldn't stand the constant happy references to Stanford, as though all Stanford students and academics have the answers to life. While it was informative to read about half of the tips in this book, and filled with advice I've also heard from recruiters, it was a slog to finish and I ended up taking almost a six month break before I could work my way through the last half. However, it's one of the least annoying examples of job hunt literature I've read (which is saying a lot about the genre), so I do recommend it for that reason.

  • Yazaid Ahmed
    Oct 11, 2016

    I give it 5 stars because the concepts and ideas in it are so powerful and positive. Majority of them aligned perfectly well with even my faith.

    There are concepts and ideas that when you learn will make life interesting to you just by knowing that there are actually people who think a certain way or have a certain point of view on the same things that once seemed daunting for you which will make the same things exciting for you.

    I was so excited and h

    I give it 5 stars because the concepts and ideas in it are so powerful and positive. Majority of them aligned perfectly well with even my faith.

    There are concepts and ideas that when you learn will make life interesting to you just by knowing that there are actually people who think a certain way or have a certain point of view on the same things that once seemed daunting for you which will make the same things exciting for you.

    I was so excited and hooked throughout the entire book until the end I'm writing this review at 3.27 a.m.

    What got me even more excited is that while reading the book I would get ideas to implement I would stop reading and go implement them right away only to discover that at the end of the chapter they are the very ame things the authos suggest to do.

    I have already recommended this book to 6 of my friends. Created a what's up group for 4 of my friends and we will embark on it together.

    Right now what is left for me is to get some prototypes ready for my parallel lives to experiment with and then delve into the most exciting one.

    You guys have done a tremendous job.

    Thanks.

  • Allison
    Oct 21, 2016

    While I can come up with a few groups who might not benefit from this book, I would think in general most would take away something to help them in their approach to life. The authors provide helpful anecdotes, exercises, and insight to guide the reader on the path of living intentionally.

    As a Christian, I understandably found the lack of spirituality and reliance on self didn't fully align with my worldview. However, this book is a framework, and I think with thoughtfulness can be used by peopl

    While I can come up with a few groups who might not benefit from this book, I would think in general most would take away something to help them in their approach to life. The authors provide helpful anecdotes, exercises, and insight to guide the reader on the path of living intentionally.

    As a Christian, I understandably found the lack of spirituality and reliance on self didn't fully align with my worldview. However, this book is a framework, and I think with thoughtfulness can be used by people with spiritual beliefs or persuasions and catered to include those frameworks.

    Overall, a useful book to have on the self-help or career-planning shelf.

  • Sara
    Oct 17, 2016

    I found the book to be helpful and worth reading. Many of the points they made were things that I'd previously considered, but they elaborated or reframed many of them and, especially important to me, encouraged you not to dwell on or agonize over things. For me, it helped refocus my attention different aspects - let's hope I can keep it up!

    I checked the book out of the library and it really is best completed as a workbook, which is difficult when I only had the book for two weeks. For example,

    I found the book to be helpful and worth reading. Many of the points they made were things that I'd previously considered, but they elaborated or reframed many of them and, especially important to me, encouraged you not to dwell on or agonize over things. For me, it helped refocus my attention different aspects - let's hope I can keep it up!

    I checked the book out of the library and it really is best completed as a workbook, which is difficult when I only had the book for two weeks. For example, one exercise tells you to track something for three weeks. That's just not possible with a new library book.

  • Rachel
    Oct 23, 2016

    I actually thought this was going to be more about life rather than focusing on just work. Dschool and DT apologists will insist that this stuff can be applied to life too, but that's a farking load of steaming hot BS. It's about work. Full stop.

    And, sure, okay, the method in the book probably works for that...or at least a fairly narrow sub-set of highly skilled and highly valued workers in large urban areas. People who are basically on track for a good career no matter what. For people who a)

    I actually thought this was going to be more about life rather than focusing on just work. Dschool and DT apologists will insist that this stuff can be applied to life too, but that's a farking load of steaming hot BS. It's about work. Full stop.

    And, sure, okay, the method in the book probably works for that...or at least a fairly narrow sub-set of highly skilled and highly valued workers in large urban areas. People who are basically on track for a good career no matter what. For people who a) may not be the top in their class, b) may be pursuing careers outside tech and big business, or c) may find themselves in a smaller city or rural situation are NOT going to profit from this, except to realize what choices they don't have and what lives they'll NEVER lead.

    Kinda depressing.

    For the rest of us, it's kind of...meh.

    However, it did take me back to my three-option five year plan from grad school which started with the quote: "Sometimes I can hear my bones straining under the weight of all the lives I'm not living."

    So I don't disagree with them 100% - I just don't see very much of real value here for people who aren't over-anxious, confused, or indecisive one-percenters.

    Overall, over-hyped business book. Blah.

  • Gaylord Dold
    Jan 04, 2017

    Only two Stanford academics could sell the

    idea that one designs a life the way one designs

    a car. Life surprises, daunts, accepts gratefully

    and surrenders grudgingly--mostly those things

    that people strive toward. Sometimes there are

    surprises, by-ways, tunnels and dead-ends we

    deal with on a case-by-case basis. Mostly, our

    character is fate, as Nietzsche said. I guess it was

    the fate of Stanford to hire life designers and to

    let their classes become popular. The rest of us

    just have to muddle through s

    Only two Stanford academics could sell the

    idea that one designs a life the way one designs

    a car. Life surprises, daunts, accepts gratefully

    and surrenders grudgingly--mostly those things

    that people strive toward. Sometimes there are

    surprises, by-ways, tunnels and dead-ends we

    deal with on a case-by-case basis. Mostly, our

    character is fate, as Nietzsche said. I guess it was

    the fate of Stanford to hire life designers and to

    let their classes become popular. The rest of us

    just have to muddle through somehow.

  • Deborah
    Jan 31, 2017

    Try Stuff

    1. Write a few sentences about how it's going in each of the 4 areas

    2. Mark where you are (0 to Full)

    3. Ask yourself if there's a design problem you'd like to tackle

    4. Now ask yourself if it's a problem of 'gravity' (not one that's gonna change).

    Someone helps you figure out what you think vs telling you what to do

    Integrity -

    Coherence among

    - Who you are

    - What you believe

    - What you are doing.

    1. Complete a log of daily activ

    Try Stuff

    1. Write a few sentences about how it's going in each of the 4 areas

    2. Mark where you are (0 to Full)

    3. Ask yourself if there's a design problem you'd like to tackle

    4. Now ask yourself if it's a problem of 'gravity' (not one that's gonna change).

    Someone helps you figure out what you think vs telling you what to do

    Integrity -

    Coherence among

    - Who you are

    - What you believe

    - What you are doing.

    1. Complete a log of daily activities. Not when you are energized and/or engaged.

    2. Continue for 3 weeks

    3. Jot down your reflections at the end of each week

    4. Are there any surprises in your reflections?

    5. Zoom in and get more specific about what does/not energize or engage you

    6. AEIOU method (Activities, Environments, Interactions, Objects, Users).

    Life 1 - The Thing You Do

    Life 2 - The Thing You'd Do If Thing 1 Were Suddenly Gone

    Life 3 - The Thing You'd Do If Money or Image Were No Object

    Dysfunctional: You focus on your need to find a job

    Reframe: Focus on the hiring manager's need to find the right person.

    Actively seek and co-create your dream job.

    - Start the call with news and agenda. Check in with people.

  • Tony Snyder
    Feb 19, 2017

    Absolutely superb! This book will reward multiple readings. I love the way it breaks down life into navigable sections and the positive view of community and mentoring it gives!

  • Patricia Baker
    Feb 19, 2017

    I need to put all their exercises into practice. Would recommend for Julie, Sydney and Stuart!