Outlander Kitchen: The Official Outlander Companion Cookbook

Outlander Kitchen: The Official Outlander Companion Cookbook

A cookbook of recipes inspired by the Outlander characters—a culinary retelling of Diana Gabaldon’s bestselling series.Readers and cooks time-travel from Outlander through A Breath of Snow and Ashes, and along the way encounter authentic recipes, modern interpretations, and creative dishes that are both doable and delicious!Claire’s first lonely bowl of “Mrs. Fitz’s Porrid...

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Title:Outlander Kitchen: The Official Outlander Companion Cookbook
Author:Theresa Carle-Sanders
Rating:
ISBN:1101967579
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:320 pages

Outlander Kitchen: The Official Outlander Companion Cookbook Reviews

  • Hildy
    Feb 07, 2016

    I am so looking forward to this! My friend Theresa has spent years creating recipes for her Outlander Kitchen blog. I've tried a some of them and they were awesome, especially the cottage pie. Finally she is being rewarded for all of her hard work. I can't wait to own this and have it in my kitchen.

  • Tina
    Dec 15, 2016

    I remember picking up the paperback novel Outlander by Diana Gabaldon from the library's sale table. Historical fiction, a bit of time travel and a venue in the Scottish Highlands had me very interested. As with many Gabaldon fans, I fell in love with the series. This was my first book by this author.

    The books are great but I must admit I wasn't a big fan of the TV show. The actor playing Jamie just isn't right (for me). Yes, I know I am in the minority regarding the actor playing Jamie but....i

    I remember picking up the paperback novel Outlander by Diana Gabaldon from the library's sale table. Historical fiction, a bit of time travel and a venue in the Scottish Highlands had me very interested. As with many Gabaldon fans, I fell in love with the series. This was my first book by this author.

    The books are great but I must admit I wasn't a big fan of the TV show. The actor playing Jamie just isn't right (for me). Yes, I know I am in the minority regarding the actor playing Jamie but....it just doesn't work for me.

    Still....being a fan of this series I knew I had to check out this new cookbook, Outlander Kitchen by Theresa Carle- Sanders. I am pleased to say this book is fantastic- a wonderful gift for the Outlander fan. Christmas is coming up so, keep that in mind.

    Each recipe is preceded by a passage from one of the books (see below) and the photo of the pastry or dish and full recipe. This is enjoyable to read through without a thought to which of these recipes you want to try.

    outlander1

    The forward on this book is also interesting to read. It describes how our author came to find her passion in the kitchen after enduring a series of less-than-satisfying jobs. Many times I admit to scanning the beginnings with the dedications and thoughts. This one had me reading each and every paragraph. Interesting.

    This photo was too good for me to exclude. She has a shiba inu, a breed I adore! Shibas are certainly not for the first time dog owner, too big a challenge, but I am fascinated with the breed. We still miss our Kobe who left us too soon but Aja, our 14 year old cream shiba, still rules the house. Ok, more pup info than I needed to share here....couldn't resist.

    One of the recipes I wanted to try was a simple one, Mrs. FitzGibbons's Overnight Parritch. This oatmeal breakfast figures prominently in the books and it seems they have it for breakfast quite a bit.

    Traditionally made from oatmeal and stirred with a spurtle (clockwise, to keep the devil away). Parritch, or porridge, evolved from pottage, a thick vegetable and grain stew that served as the mainstay of the European diet until the seventeenth century.

    Full review and photos may be found at :

  • Diane Close
    Jun 24, 2016

    While I was disappointed the book didn't contain a recipe for tablet (especially an old, authentic one that doesn't use sweetened condensed milk), the rest of the recipes were well done, nicely represented and everything I tried cooked up great. I docked one star for having a little too many modern recipes (like enchiladas and fish tacos) that detracted from the authentic, historic feel of the book. The historic and modernized-historic ones that are present are pretty much perfect though! I don'

    While I was disappointed the book didn't contain a recipe for tablet (especially an old, authentic one that doesn't use sweetened condensed milk), the rest of the recipes were well done, nicely represented and everything I tried cooked up great. I docked one star for having a little too many modern recipes (like enchiladas and fish tacos) that detracted from the authentic, historic feel of the book. The historic and modernized-historic ones that are present are pretty much perfect though! I don't follow the TV series and I've never read the novels, but I am a fan of Scottish food and I loved this cookbook.

  • Heather J.
    Jul 31, 2016

    beautiful pictures. I enjoy the clips from the books. The recipes I've made are all excellent.

  • SmartBitches
    Aug 01, 2016

    One thing you notice as you read the Outlander series is all the mentions of food. It’s not quite as prolific as all the food in A Song of Ice and Fire, but there’s a lot of book and a lot of food. As we’ve seen, a lot of people like food (I am one) and like playing with food, and Outlander fandom being what it is, we should not be surprised that there is now an Outlander cookbook!

    For each recipe in this cookbook, we have excerpt of the book that mention

    One thing you notice as you read the Outlander series is all the mentions of food. It’s not quite as prolific as all the food in A Song of Ice and Fire, but there’s a lot of book and a lot of food. As we’ve seen, a lot of people like food (I am one) and like playing with food, and Outlander fandom being what it is, we should not be surprised that there is now an Outlander cookbook!

    For each recipe in this cookbook, we have excerpt of the book that mentions food (…mostly…) and then gives a recipe for a reasonable interpretation of that food. We have appetizers, breakfast foods, soups, main entrees, desserts, drinks, preserves, and, my favorite part, basics that you need for some of the more complicated recipes (broth, puff pastry, quick cheese, etc). One could do a whole meal from this book.

    I haven’t had a chance to cook anything from the book, but I find the methodology to be clear, and the instructions easy to follow. The recipes don’t require a lot of experience in cooking to instinctively know what you’re supposed to do next (it’s not like the technical challenge in The Great British Bake Off), though having your copy of The Joy of Cooking handy for any questions that you might have would be a good idea – though that is a good idea, like, all the time. Carle-Sanders is a trained chef, so she knows what she’s about when it comes to the mechanics.

    You all know the reason I was interested in the book: I wanted to know about the historical aspect! To that end, I’m not impressed. Carle-Sanders says she used 18th century cookbooks as a starting point, but there’s no bibliography or indication of what recipe she adapted. For some of these recipes, I can make a reasonably educated guess, but I want sources! I ALWAYS WANT YOUR SOURCES.

    I’m also annoyed that, for the historical recipes, she does not include the original recipe she adapted. You know my particular nerdery involves knowing the starting point, and I want to see part of the process, and I think other people would be interested in seeing Point A and a little bit about how Point A became Point D. She says in the introduction that she wanted this book to be useable and not just a curiosity on the shelf, and that she wanted it to be fun.

    I think this cookbook does exactly what it set out to do, and I think a lot of people are going to enjoy this. It’s going on my cookbook shelf, but not near my historical books.

    -Redheadedgirl

  • Beth Cato
    Aug 08, 2016

    I received this cookbook through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program.

    This is a cookbook that can be enjoyed on multiple levels. First of all, it's a cookbook with a diverse selection of recipes for food and drink, and many of them are period recipes written in a way to be accessible to the 21st century cook. For example, Drunken Mock-Turtle Soup uses oxtail along with a bottle of sherry. Baking soda and powder, 19th century inventions, are in bread recipes to allow for a good rise. Excerpts

    I received this cookbook through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program.

    This is a cookbook that can be enjoyed on multiple levels. First of all, it's a cookbook with a diverse selection of recipes for food and drink, and many of them are period recipes written in a way to be accessible to the 21st century cook. For example, Drunken Mock-Turtle Soup uses oxtail along with a bottle of sherry. Baking soda and powder, 19th century inventions, are in bread recipes to allow for a good rise. Excerpts from the series accompany most of the recipes; an exception being Diana Gabaldon's personal recipe for Cheese Enchiladas. Most recipes feature a photograph, and the shots are quite well done.

    I'm not a big Outlander fan; I have only read the first book. I don't mind spoilers in the slightest, though, and I quite enjoyed the excerpts with the recipes. They really showed Gabaldon's skill in scant paragraphs. I can imagine that hardcore fans will get a lot out of this book--it could well provoke a series re-read--and it would certainly be fun to host viewing parties for the TV show while dining on recipes from this book.

    I have only had time to test one recipe so far, but it was wonderful. Ginger-Nut Biscuits, on page 274-275, ended up just as depicted in the picture: broad, cakey cookies with a lovely sugar-crackle top and a fresh ginger flavor within. This one is definitely worth making again! I made note of 10 recipes I want to try, including Crowdie cheese, millionaire shortbread, and two for scones.

    The one complaint I have is the font used for the page numbers. The font is very curly. I kept confusing 1 and 4. This is a small issue, true, but an aggravation when you're trying to write down recipes by page number only to find out later that several are incorrect.

  • Sara
    Sep 04, 2016

    "The must have cookbook for Outlander lovers!"

    Review at:

  • Kathy Baker
    Nov 02, 2016

    Love this cookbook. I am not a fan of spending time in the kitchen, but there is no denying the pay-offs of these recipes.

  • Dana
    Nov 05, 2016

    I have to admit, I usually stay away from Fandom cookbooks like this. I just can't take them seriously. However, when I saw that this book was up for Best Cookbook of the Year, being the Outlander fan that I am, I knew I had to check it out.

    I was surprised to find that this book is the real deal. Not concocted by fans, but actually written by a professional cook that has studied and written about Irish and Scottish food and history for years, this book is "official"...and it shows. Also, the au

    I have to admit, I usually stay away from Fandom cookbooks like this. I just can't take them seriously. However, when I saw that this book was up for Best Cookbook of the Year, being the Outlander fan that I am, I knew I had to check it out.

    I was surprised to find that this book is the real deal. Not concocted by fans, but actually written by a professional cook that has studied and written about Irish and Scottish food and history for years, this book is "official"...and it shows. Also, the author received Diana Gabaldon's go-ahead on this project, which I feel confident would not have happened if this book and these recipes were not legit. Enjoy being taken back in time with this piece!

  • Anna Lapping
    Nov 08, 2016

    The best and most beautiful cookbook I've had in years. The recipes are well written and researched.