Stormwalker

Stormwalker

Ever since his mother died, 11-year-old Owen has felt lost. He's drifting apart from his dad, his grades are dropping, and the only thing keeping him sane are the soccer trials coming up.Then, in the middle of school one day, he is sucked out of real life and thrown into a desolate alternative world, a largely deserted wasteland where a menacing storm of Darkness plagues t...

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Title:Stormwalker
Author:Mike Revell
Rating:
ISBN:1681444933
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages

Stormwalker Reviews

  • Cora ☕ Tea Party Princess
    Jun 16, 2016
  • Ruth
    Jun 20, 2016

    A truly exciting, imaginative story about a boy who becomes the hero of his writer Dad's terrifying story. This is a fantastic book. A terrific, action thriller with a real emotional core. It covers grief, loss, friendship and football and wraps them up in a page turning, adventure - my emotions were all over the place! I really couldn't put it down.

  • Amber C
    Dec 22, 2016

    Stormwalker, by Mike Revell, is a beautifully well written tale about a son and father experiencing heavy grief over the loss of his mom/wife. This tale shares the true terrors of grief, and how the two overcome this terrifying stage of their lives, together, as son and father.

  • Susan
    Dec 23, 2016

    I won this book through Goodreads. Heartbreaking but beautiful. Father and son find a way to get through their grief in a different way that works for them. Loved it.

  • Summer
    Jan 12, 2017

    A year after the death of his mother, a twelve year old boy urges his author dad to write again, thinking it will help with his dad’s grief, only the boy finds himself pulled into the bleak world of his father’s novel, jumping back and forth between his real life as an aspiring athlete, and the life of the boy in the book, forced to step up as a hero, and face his aching loss.

    While there are some undeniably sad moments, it isn’t overwhelmingly so, it felt like the right balance for it’s intended

    A year after the death of his mother, a twelve year old boy urges his author dad to write again, thinking it will help with his dad’s grief, only the boy finds himself pulled into the bleak world of his father’s novel, jumping back and forth between his real life as an aspiring athlete, and the life of the boy in the book, forced to step up as a hero, and face his aching loss.

    While there are some undeniably sad moments, it isn’t overwhelmingly so, it felt like the right balance for it’s intended middle-grade audience, touching on the difficult stuff just long enough before returning to more adventurous scenes.

    The world-building in the father’s book wasn’t overly complicated, as an adult reader, I maybe wanted a little more, but again, it seemed like just enough for kids, and anyways it’s not really about the world-building, the more important thing is the emotional journey for this father and son.

    I thought it would have been interesting to see a little more interaction between Owen’s two worlds, like if maybe his father found out what was going on, and part of their healing was in working through the story together, but it was still solid storytelling without that element, and the end of both stories had a really nice uplifting quality.

    Lastly, more female characters would have been welcome, I did enjoy Iris, she had a great curiosity and sense of self in her scenes, though I would have loved if she’d played an even more prominent role.

    I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway.

  • Nikki
    Feb 27, 2017

    I won this book free in a Goodreads giveaway.

    This book is about a boy who lost his mom and dealing with that along with his dads depression. His dad starts to write a book and he finds himself suddenly in the book where he has to save the characters he grows to care for.

    Since I also lost my mother as a child and had to deal with my dad being lost afterwards this book hit hard for me. The emotions in the book were real and true to what it is like in real life. The parts of the book where Owen (t

    I won this book free in a Goodreads giveaway.

    This book is about a boy who lost his mom and dealing with that along with his dads depression. His dad starts to write a book and he finds himself suddenly in the book where he has to save the characters he grows to care for.

    Since I also lost my mother as a child and had to deal with my dad being lost afterwards this book hit hard for me. The emotions in the book were real and true to what it is like in real life. The parts of the book where Owen (the main character) is in his father's books read quick and I could tell the alternate world was well thought out by the author. For a book targeted for children it was very well written.

  • Daniel the derpster
    Dec 23, 2016

    Really good book I recommend it

  • Erin Reilly-Sanders
    Jan 08, 2017

    Review written for SLJ:

    Grades 4-6

    It’s been a year since 12-year-old Owen’s artist mom died, but he and his dad are still adjusting to the changes. While Owen is focusing on his soccer games, his dad hasn’t written anything since “the Longest Day.” When he starts writing again, Owen is sucked into the dystopian landscape of his father’s futuristic story and hopes that by living out the story he can help his dad heal.

    Despite the semi-sentimental play on one of the oldest tropes of fiction, Storm W

    Review written for SLJ:

    Grades 4-6

    It’s been a year since 12-year-old Owen’s artist mom died, but he and his dad are still adjusting to the changes. While Owen is focusing on his soccer games, his dad hasn’t written anything since “the Longest Day.” When he starts writing again, Owen is sucked into the dystopian landscape of his father’s futuristic story and hopes that by living out the story he can help his dad heal.

    Despite the semi-sentimental play on one of the oldest tropes of fiction, Storm Walker focuses on action and suspense. The characters are generally white, male, and even bland with personality imbedded in events more than anything else. Some readers may find the British English confusing, particularly with the sports terminology, but otherwise this dystopian book aims at a younger crowd than most. As a second novel, some of the issues such as not capitalizing on the ramifications of the father as author of the story and neglect of some of the more interesting aspects of the situation are likely to be worked out in future books. Although the writing builds up a generous amount of anticipation, the final plot reveal seems too simple, especially in comparison. In the end, this book may find a place in libraries in want of male-oriented, action-packed, and/or younger dystopian adventures.

    VERDICT Storm Walker produces a story that is at once intriguing and tiresome that may appeal to middle graders more than adults.

  • Cindy Hudson
    Jan 24, 2017

    Owen doesn’t like to think about the longest day in his life, the day a year ago when his mom died. He is finally beginning to find joy in the good things in his life, like being with his best friend and playing soccer. But Owen is worried about his dad, who can’t seem to get over his grief. Things look up when his dad starts writing again; then Owen finds himself going out of his own reality and into a fantasy world, his dad’s story. Can he help both their lives by getting his dad to finish the

    Owen doesn’t like to think about the longest day in his life, the day a year ago when his mom died. He is finally beginning to find joy in the good things in his life, like being with his best friend and playing soccer. But Owen is worried about his dad, who can’t seem to get over his grief. Things look up when his dad starts writing again; then Owen finds himself going out of his own reality and into a fantasy world, his dad’s story. Can he help both their lives by getting his dad to finish the tale, or will he get lost in the life of Jake, the character his dad created?

    Storm Walker by Mike Revell examines the nature of grief through an inventive story about a boy who will always feel the loss of his mom but who also wants to live a vibrant life with his dad again. Owen’s forays into his dad’s story are difficult, as the world he enters is bleak and dangerous. He also loses big chunks of his own life, and begins to feel the separation from everyone important to him. Still, he persists because he wants to help his dad.

    As Storm Walker moves between the two story lines, readers are pulled into what is happening in both. It’s a technique that’s not easy to accomplish, but Revell does a great job of keeping readers interested in what’s happening with Owen as well as with Jake, his literary doppelganger. The stories weave together in a way that will keep readers guessing about what happens next right up until the end.

    I recommend Storm Walker for mother-daughter book clubs with girls aged 9 to 12.

    The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.