The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own

The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own

Don’t Settle for More  Most of us know we own too much stuff. We feel the weight and burden of our clutter, and we tire of cleaning and managing and organizing.   While excess consumption leads to bigger houses, faster cars, fancier technology, and cluttered homes, it never brings happiness. Rather, it results in a desire for more. It redirects our God-given passions to t...

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Title:The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own
Author:Joshua Becker
Rating:
ISBN:1601427964
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:240 pages

The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own Reviews

  • Sarah
    May 02, 2016

    So I've been a minimalist for a solid year and a half now and it's been almost two years since I started researching and toying with the idea of it. For a while I said I was on a "minimalist kick," but clearly it's not just a kick anymore.

    Joshua Becker's blog, Becoming Minimalist, has been one of my favorite resources as I've progressed on my minimalism journey, so even though I'm nowhere near the beginning of my minimalism journey and have read a lot of his stuff, I was still excited to pick th

    So I've been a minimalist for a solid year and a half now and it's been almost two years since I started researching and toying with the idea of it. For a while I said I was on a "minimalist kick," but clearly it's not just a kick anymore.

    Joshua Becker's blog, Becoming Minimalist, has been one of my favorite resources as I've progressed on my minimalism journey, so even though I'm nowhere near the beginning of my minimalism journey and have read a lot of his stuff, I was still excited to pick this up.

    This is an excellent starting place for anyone who is thinking about shifting to a minimalist lifestyle. Becker goes through and discusses the why of minimalism, the various benefits of minimalism ranging from less stress to better health to more time to more money and everything in between, and continues by giving you specific action steps and ideas for doing an initial decluttering of your home and continuing to experiment with less in different ways until you find the right balance for your own life. He shares stories about his personal journey with minimalism, along with the stories of many other prominent people in the minimalist movement, many of which I had read, but many of which were also new to me.

    Though I'm basically done with the initial decluttering of my home (still have to tackle that kitchen), I still really appreciated Becker's insight and thoughts on the value of simplifying your possession and your life. If you're at all considering minimalism, I would definitely recommend checking this book out. You will not be disappointed.

  • Kelene Totzke
    May 02, 2016

    Over the weekend I had the pleasure of reading an advance copy of Joshua Becker’s new book, “The More of Less.” By the 2nd chapter, I had to put the book down for a second to get a highlighter. As I continued to read, I started thinking, “I can’t wait to pass this book on to (insert several friends’ names here).” But then I realized I want to keep my copy as a reference. So, spoiler alert, my new go-to all-occasion gift is this terrific book.

    Reading “The More of Less” is like listening to a frie

    Over the weekend I had the pleasure of reading an advance copy of Joshua Becker’s new book, “The More of Less.” By the 2nd chapter, I had to put the book down for a second to get a highlighter. As I continued to read, I started thinking, “I can’t wait to pass this book on to (insert several friends’ names here).” But then I realized I want to keep my copy as a reference. So, spoiler alert, my new go-to all-occasion gift is this terrific book.

    Reading “The More of Less” is like listening to a friend. Joshua has a way of writing that is completely engaging, leading you ever forward towards a fuller, better way of life. He is honest about the struggles, yet gives you confidence that you can achieve the goals of minimalism that suit you.

    The chapters are arranged so that you move from understanding what minimalism is, then how to strategically go about decluttering, and finally, creating a significant, intentional life. Not bad for 220 pages, huh?

    I hope you choose to read Joshua’s book, and that you find as much value in “The More of Less” as I did, and continue to do.

  • Rachel Willard
    May 09, 2016

    There was nothing new here compared to his other books and other authors have done better with this subject. I also didn't appreciate the gratuitous amount of Christian preaching that this book had. There should have been a disclaimer on the back that this was a religious book.

  • Emma Sea
    Jun 18, 2016

    A very good book if you are considering cutting down on your stuff and just want a nudge to take the plunge. If you've already made that decision this will not be as useful.

  • Gina
    Jun 18, 2016

    To be honest, I skimmed this book, and I did so because:

    1) I'm at the point where I'm more interested in practical application and exercises, not personal stories. A bit of that is fine, but every minimalist blogger/author has a story of how they came to to minimalism, and those stories aren't that different.

    2) Religion. Becker is a Christian, and he states in the introduction that he's included bible stories as support of the minimalist lifestyle. Fair enough. That's not my cup of tea, as they

    To be honest, I skimmed this book, and I did so because:

    1) I'm at the point where I'm more interested in practical application and exercises, not personal stories. A bit of that is fine, but every minimalist blogger/author has a story of how they came to to minimalism, and those stories aren't that different.

    2) Religion. Becker is a Christian, and he states in the introduction that he's included bible stories as support of the minimalist lifestyle. Fair enough. That's not my cup of tea, as they say.

  • Vivian
    Jun 27, 2016

    Thank you Joshua Becker for your inspirational and motivating "why" and "how to" manual on what you call "minimalism". I've already implemented some of your very practical and doable suggestions. I've read aloud many excerpts to my family. It seems we've been on this journey for at least a decade.

    Here's our story. We were driving through a nearby small town on our way to hiking to a grotto when we passed by a model home that we stopped to explore. We ended up touring that home several times ove

    Thank you Joshua Becker for your inspirational and motivating "why" and "how to" manual on what you call "minimalism". I've already implemented some of your very practical and doable suggestions. I've read aloud many excerpts to my family. It seems we've been on this journey for at least a decade.

    Here's our story. We were driving through a nearby small town on our way to hiking to a grotto when we passed by a model home that we stopped to explore. We ended up touring that home several times over the next few weeks. Then I realized that if we were to move into that home it wouldn't be much different than where we were living. We would have to get rid of a lot of stuff for the home to have the feeling the model home had. I wanted that feeling.

    We didn't buy that home but we began decluttering and by the time we were finished we all LOVED our home. We even daringly painted rooms the bright colors we wanted and completed all the repairs it needed. We moved on to the yard and loved it too.

    We ended up selling that home and have moved three times since then. I have learned so much on this journey but still needed to stumble across your books (I read CLUTTERFREE WITH KIDS first).

    The other current best-seller on this topic was not for me. (EVERYTHING I have brings me joy! Why else would I have it?)

    I appreciated the "misconceptions" you identified -- namely "minimalism is about giving up everything" or "is about organizing your stuff". I have used some of the ideas you shared from other people, including "Project 333" (wearing only 33 pieces of clothing for 3 months), which has simplified and greatly improved my wardrobe choices. The "leveling" and "packing party" suggestions are good for helping the timid begin. I personally love the "twenty-nine" approach, although I adapted it to better suit my needs and style. It's easier to do all this with your suggested, "let's experiment" approach.

    I love your emphasis on relationships. The counsel you share on page 171 in the "Minimalist Family" chapter is especially important. There you say, among other things, that "deep heart wounds my be causing your partner or child to be a hoarder". My mother lived through the Great Depression as a child and that may be one reason she has been an incurable hoarder. My father valued their marriage and day-to-day relationship over his own disposition for order and cleanliness so adapted to her needs over his.

    I related whole-heartedly to your "garage-sale dud" story and therefore appreciated your spot-on alternatives to trying to get some return on the investments made in stuff which can prove to be a journey-killing roadblock.

    The rubber really hit the road for me in your final chapters about living intentionally. You said that before you implemented "minimalism" in your life yours was a life of drifting, not focused direction (page 191). Your observation that "this is what makes the unexamined life so dangerous" hit home for me. You said, "We think we are living life to the fullest but we aren't. Instead, we are often trading long-term purpose for short-term pleasure."

    Finally, thank you for re-sharing the story of "the pearl of great price". I am already seeing its application in so many areas of my life. In addition to that, you've inadvertently shown me that I am somewhat adrift as a human being, lacking that spark a bigger dream can have on launching me to something bigger and better.

    As an afterthought, I'll admit me and my family had "plateaued". It does take constant attention to complete this journey or to even stay abreast of the avalanche of stuff that continues to work its way into my life. For this, your "Clutter Busters" tips (pages 138 - 142) were just what I needed. Thank you!

  • Jen Dykxhoorn
    Jul 14, 2016

    Mediocre at best.

    Didn't realize the overt religiosity contained in the book. Becker attempts to justify the biblical bits as "relevant to all faiths and viewpoints" but he does come off as very preachy and self-richeous.

    I was reading this book to gain inspiration to continue my journey in minimalism. I had previously read Marie Kondo's Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up and followed Cait Flanders (Blonde on a Budget)'s process of owning less and living more simply, which I found completely insp

    Mediocre at best.

    Didn't realize the overt religiosity contained in the book. Becker attempts to justify the biblical bits as "relevant to all faiths and viewpoints" but he does come off as very preachy and self-richeous.

    I was reading this book to gain inspiration to continue my journey in minimalism. I had previously read Marie Kondo's Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up and followed Cait Flanders (Blonde on a Budget)'s process of owning less and living more simply, which I found completely inspirational.

    On the other hand, I found this account to be grating.

    Further, as you get further into the book, he starts to expound on his fitness and nutritional habits, and I feel like screaming at him to "stay in his lane!" I know we have largely become a "post-fact" society, where we tend to over-weight anecdotal accounts of how to better our lives, but in this case, I felt it was jarring to hear someone wax on about how his experience of minimalism has suddenly also enabled him with the knowledge and expertise to tell people how to pursue fitness and health goals.

    Maybe you might like it, but I would not recommend.

  • Jennifer
    Aug 10, 2016

    I had very high hopes for this one, as I am a minimalist at heart, but I was disappointed. Maybe I've just read all there is to read on the subject but I kept having the feeling that Becker was trying to sell me on minimalism, literally, which I suppose makes sense since promoting it is his job, and as such it came across to me as a series of soundbites as opposed to sincerity. I'm sure living this way has changed his life for the better but I just never felt inspired to make any changes or even

    I had very high hopes for this one, as I am a minimalist at heart, but I was disappointed. Maybe I've just read all there is to read on the subject but I kept having the feeling that Becker was trying to sell me on minimalism, literally, which I suppose makes sense since promoting it is his job, and as such it came across to me as a series of soundbites as opposed to sincerity. I'm sure living this way has changed his life for the better but I just never felt inspired to make any changes or even to put the book down and throw something away.

  • Anne Lawson
    Aug 15, 2016

    In the world of simplicity/decluttering books (and there are a lot out there now), some say Joshua Becker says nothing new.

    Others have criticized his emphasis on Christianity.

    Here's my take:

    1. I have read nearly ALL books having to do with minimalism, simplicity, decluttering, cleaning. This is probably my second-favorite, if not favorite (Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up is just quirky and intense enough to be vying for the top spot). Becker does say things others aren't saying: for instanc

    In the world of simplicity/decluttering books (and there are a lot out there now), some say Joshua Becker says nothing new.

    Others have criticized his emphasis on Christianity.

    Here's my take:

    1. I have read nearly ALL books having to do with minimalism, simplicity, decluttering, cleaning. This is probably my second-favorite, if not favorite (Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up is just quirky and intense enough to be vying for the top spot). Becker does say things others aren't saying: for instance, he's the only one I know who addresses each generation and talks about their own hindrances or tendencies when it comes to decluttering, which was very helpful. Unlike Marie Kondo and others, he introduces the concept of "leveling" (not getting rid of things totally, but boxing them up and moving them to a different location to see if you can live without them). He's also a proponent of starting small if you have to, and making it a lifestyle. I think this is more realistic for people, and the emphasis on small victories which keep you going is a truth also discovered by Dave Ramsey, who gives the same advice when it comes to debt reduction. Also, although other books address simplicity from a Christian standpoint, and occasionally point to Jesus as the example of a simple life, only Becker actually talks about Scripture in a way that reveals Jesus' heart towards possessions and His balanced treatment of people (I love the comparison between the Gadarene man and the rich young ruler). This shows that Jesus' intent was the heart, not to make giving away all your possessions a requirement for righteousness, therefore leading to works. Which leads me to point #2:

    2. I loved it most because of the emphasis on Jesus, and Becker's declaration of Christianity. Sometimes I have felt he kept his faith veiled on his blog. He is unashamed in this book, and I love it. If someone is offended because they started reading it and didn't know it would have Christian references, I don't know how much more obvious it could be. The library call number on my copy is 241.68, which means you would be in the Christian section when you discover it. The subject on the classification page is "Simplicity - Religious aspects - Christianity". Very early on in the book, Becker writes, "My religious background has played a significant role in both by understanding and my practice of minimalism. You'll see me make the connection periodically through the book." So, no one should be surprised about that. However, I can honestly say that nothing in this book would offend someone of a different faith. In fact, Becker does a great job of showing the life examples of others who have embraced minimalism, and some of those have come through the teaching of Buddha and others.

    Finally! This is the Jesus-focused approach to minimalism I have been looking for. I will recommend it to anyone wanting to learn more about minimalism, no matter what their faith. Thank you, Joshua Becker, for adding your voice to the mix!

  • Joana Cotidiana
    Jan 06, 2017

    inha o audiobook há algum tempo e num dia de limpezas acabei por desencantá-lo.

    abitualmente oiço música mas tenho a dizer que foi uma ótima companhia também!

    quando dei por mim não tinha apenas limpo mas minimizado um pouco mais.

    ais e mais coisas desnecessárias vão aparecendo no meu caminho e consegui dizer adeus a algumas delas inspirada pelas palavras do autor.

    minimalismo já não me é um desconhecido mas há sempre algo a aprender e a absorver para aplicar à nossa realidade.

    ecomendo muito

    inha o audiobook há algum tempo e num dia de limpezas acabei por desencantá-lo.

    abitualmente oiço música mas tenho a dizer que foi uma ótima companhia também!

    quando dei por mim não tinha apenas limpo mas minimizado um pouco mais.

    ais e mais coisas desnecessárias vão aparecendo no meu caminho e consegui dizer adeus a algumas delas inspirada pelas palavras do autor.

    minimalismo já não me é um desconhecido mas há sempre algo a aprender e a absorver para aplicar à nossa realidade.

    ecomendo muito porque este livro não é só sobre a experiência do autor, mas sim um género de manual onde são discutidos os benefícios deste estilo de ver o mundo e dadas dicas.

    u achei especialmente útil para mim a parte em que é abordada a convivência com pessoas não minimalistas.

    utra coisa com que me identifiquei, por motivos óbvios, foi a conversa sobre livros e tê-los, etc.

    az sentido para mim ter estantes cheias porque adoro e minimalismo não é restrição mas canalização de atenção para o que importa.

    evei muito tempo a perceber o que isso significa para mim mas com a ajuda de pessoas e de livros como este estou finalmente a fazê-lo.

    graças a isso muitas outras ideias e conceitos começaram a fazer parte da minha vida: vegetarianismo, zero waste, cruelty free, eco friendly, mindfulness, entre outros.

    ó coisas boas que valem a pena e que me têm, inclusive, ajudado a lidar com as minhas amigas: a ansiedade e a depressão.

    ei que o autor tem mais livros (e um blog que não conhecia...) e pretendo lê-los um dia.