The Stolen Child

The Stolen Child

From the author of the critically acclaimed The Mermaids Singing comes a haunting, luminous novel set on an enchanted island off the west coast of Ireland where magic, faith, and superstition pervade the inhabitants’ lives and tangled relationships—perfect for fans of Eowyn Ivey, Sarah Waters, and Angela Carter.May 1959. From one side of St. Brigid’s Island, the mountains...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Stolen Child
Author:Lisa Carey
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:384 pages

The Stolen Child Reviews

  • Diane S ☔
    Dec 28, 2016

    St. Brigid's Island, off the west coast of Ireland, the home of generations of families, families that have been touched by the myths and folklore of Ireland. The home of fairies and changelings, superstition and belief in the old ways. Emer and Rose twins, now in their twenties, Rose happy and fair, has given birth to many sets of twins, Emer, dark, brooding, a touch of her hand causes hopelessness in all but her twin. Married to brothers, Emer only one son, a son she watches over stringently,

    St. Brigid's Island, off the west coast of Ireland, the home of generations of families, families that have been touched by the myths and folklore of Ireland. The home of fairies and changelings, superstition and belief in the old ways. Emer and Rose twins, now in their twenties, Rose happy and fair, has given birth to many sets of twins, Emer, dark, brooding, a touch of her hand causes hopelessness in all but her twin. Married to brothers, Emer only one son, a son she watches over stringently, afraid the fairies will take him when he turns seven.

    Another Brigid arrives on the island, the daughter of a woman who left the island when the islanders turned on her, said to be touched by the fairy darkness herself. Brigid has a tragic back story all her own, but she has now come to the island to find St. Brigid's well, a well whose water is said to perform miracles and Brgid wants something very badly.

    The island is fictitious although the Saint herself is not, the miracles associated with her well documented. This is not a light read, it is a novel of a family, an island but of darkness as well. The magical realism within is not used in a light manner, but to reinforce the folklore, the myths that inhabit these people's lives, the fear of believing in something of which one has little control. Fairies, changeling and mystical happenings have long been a part of these people beings, they believe wholeheartedly in these things, passed down within families.

    Dark and delicious is how I would describe this book. Well written, well paced, the characters each different and connected by the island's past. If you enjoyed The Bear and the Nightingale, I think you would like this one too. Myths in a culture brought to life, both dark and intense, but with small glimpses of light.

    ARC from publisher and librarything.

    Publishes the beginning of February..

  • KC
    Dec 12, 2016

    I would like to thank Edelweiss, Harper Collins, and Lisa Carey for the advanced digital copy in exchange for an honest review. This Irish tale is a true mind-bending genre. It is part magical realism, fantasy, folk lore, bi-sexuality, and literary fiction. It's late 1950's on St. Brigid Isle, Ireland where the utmost remote villagers reside discussing stories of a magic well and fairies while sitting around their hearths. This story has the likeness to Emma Donahue's recent release, The Wonder.

    I would like to thank Edelweiss, Harper Collins, and Lisa Carey for the advanced digital copy in exchange for an honest review. This Irish tale is a true mind-bending genre. It is part magical realism, fantasy, folk lore, bi-sexuality, and literary fiction. It's late 1950's on St. Brigid Isle, Ireland where the utmost remote villagers reside discussing stories of a magic well and fairies while sitting around their hearths. This story has the likeness to Emma Donahue's recent release, The Wonder. A true conversational read.

  • Penny (Literary Hoarders)
    Jan 25, 2017

    Another very good read. Irish folklore, changelings, fairies, St. Brigid. The women left on the island of St. Brigid are being evacuated - all their men have perished to the sea - and they are being moved to government housing on the mainland. We then go back in time to hear the legends of the island, children that are taken by the fairies or other ones. Brigid, the American, returns to the island in hope for healing from the special well - her history is one steeped in mystery about

    Another very good read. Irish folklore, changelings, fairies, St. Brigid. The women left on the island of St. Brigid are being evacuated - all their men have perished to the sea - and they are being moved to government housing on the mainland. We then go back in time to hear the legends of the island, children that are taken by the fairies or other ones. Brigid, the American, returns to the island in hope for healing from the special well - her history is one steeped in mystery about the other ones taking her mother, being replaced by a changeling, she has special healing powers in her hands. Emer is also one that was partially taken and is an unhappy, bitter woman anxious to get off the island so they don't take her beloved son.

    Brigid's history and her reason for returning to the island was a very interesting part. Emer's history as well was good to read. It starts to drag, or become too long/slightly repetitive towards the middle to the end. But overall, a very good read. Carey's writing is like butter.

    I can actually fit this into the Litsy Reading Challenge for the square "With an LGBTQ relationship", so that's a bonus!

  • Teresa
    Nov 30, 2016

    I remember when I found Lisa Carey's "The Mermaids Singing" at a small used bookstore in my hometown...I devoured that book so quickly and loved it so much. This book was like that.

    I loved the magical realism that surrounds this island, a hard place to live in any time. I also loved the strong female characters, and they way they bond in anyway they can. Emer is especially an intriguing character, and don't get me started on Brigid. Overall, I loved this book, couldn't put it down.

    Thanks to Ha

    I remember when I found Lisa Carey's "The Mermaids Singing" at a small used bookstore in my hometown...I devoured that book so quickly and loved it so much. This book was like that.

    I loved the magical realism that surrounds this island, a hard place to live in any time. I also loved the strong female characters, and they way they bond in anyway they can. Emer is especially an intriguing character, and don't get me started on Brigid. Overall, I loved this book, couldn't put it down.

    Thanks to Harper Collins and Edelweiss for the ARC!

  • Lauren Hough
    Dec 29, 2016

    I didn't think magical realism was my thing. Maybe it's still not my thing. But Lisa Carey can fuckin' write. And if I'd turned a page to find dragons, I'd have devoured it all the same.

    She's woven this story of a magical, miserable Irish isle inhabited by a a hardy few who refuse to leave, even with the promise of free houses with running water and electricity. Their tight-knit community of hysteria, superstition, and grief is full of characters she's treated with such empathy, such understand

    I didn't think magical realism was my thing. Maybe it's still not my thing. But Lisa Carey can fuckin' write. And if I'd turned a page to find dragons, I'd have devoured it all the same.

    She's woven this story of a magical, miserable Irish isle inhabited by a a hardy few who refuse to leave, even with the promise of free houses with running water and electricity. Their tight-knit community of hysteria, superstition, and grief is full of characters she's treated with such empathy, such understanding, they were real. And they're blessed and plagued by fairies I began to believe might just be as real. Their quiet, desperate world is invaded by an American woman with her own secrets.

    I didn't read this book as much as I felt it. Same feeling I got when I read Emma Donoghue's The Wonder. I didn't know what was real. And I didn't care. I felt it.

  • Sherri
    Dec 30, 2016

    I received this book from the LibraryThings early reviewers and Harper Collins. I did not have any idea what I was getting into when I requested this book it just sounded intriguing. I read this book every chance I got in the 3 day holiday. When I finished it last night I just had no words. It consumed me, I felt this book. It left me questioning and stretched me to places I have never gone. Before trying to write my review of the book I had to read what others wrote because it was just so diffe

    I received this book from the LibraryThings early reviewers and Harper Collins. I did not have any idea what I was getting into when I requested this book it just sounded intriguing. I read this book every chance I got in the 3 day holiday. When I finished it last night I just had no words. It consumed me, I felt this book. It left me questioning and stretched me to places I have never gone. Before trying to write my review of the book I had to read what others wrote because it was just so different from anything I have read before. I did not know how to categorize it but KC on Goodreads summed it up best "This Irish tale is a true mind-bending genre. It is part magical realism, fantasy, folk lore, bi-sexuality, and literary fiction." Kirsten Griffith, also on Goodreads summed up the writing better than I could "This book is exquisite. Beautifully written, excellent character development, and you really feel like part of the island as you read". This book is not for everyone and I suspect there are many who would be offended by some of the subject matter but Lisa Carey undoubtedly can weave a tale and pull you deep into it, or maybe it was the fairies...

  • Tania
    Jan 21, 2017

    I adored this book, and just want to say thanks to

    for her wonderful review that made me purchase The Stolen Child.

    As the author points out in her afterword this is a book about evacuated islands, sisters, witch burning, healers, lighthouses, fairies, saints and lesbianism. The whole is more than it's parts, these elements combined to create something truly magical and unique. The two main characters, Emer and Brigid, are so gen

    I adored this book, and just want to say thanks to

    for her wonderful review that made me purchase The Stolen Child.

    As the author points out in her afterword this is a book about evacuated islands, sisters, witch burning, healers, lighthouses, fairies, saints and lesbianism. The whole is more than it's parts, these elements combined to create something truly magical and unique. The two main characters, Emer and Brigid, are so genuine that I sometimes hated Emer so much I wanted to slap her,and in the next paragraph my heart would be breaking for her again. The setting, a small little island just of the coast of Ireland, was painted so vividly that you could see it clearly. I loved learning about the evacuation of some of these islands, as well as the legend of st Brigid of Ireland . I enjoyed the fairy-tales throughout, but be warned this is a dark book - do not expect your normal brand of light and fluffy magical realism. Both the fairy-tales and the real life happenings are quite often bleak. This is an otherworldly tale about desperate, needy love and how we can choose if we will allow it to embitter us or not. My only criticism is that I wished it ended differently, I would have preferred a more open-ended conclusion, but I loved the rest too much to deduct any stars for that. I will definitely be reading more by this author.

  • Sonja Arlow
    Jan 30, 2017

    This was one of those books where I just wanted to rush home to read, loudly grumbling at any responsibilities that stole time away from reading.

    Brigid has not had an easy life. She has been an orphan, a midwife and a child bride and now at nearly 40 she is infertile and desperate to be a mother.

    She arrives on St Bridget’s Island off the coast of Ireland in the late 1950’s, an island that has always been part of Bridget’s life in the form of bed time stories told by her mother. Fantastical stori

    This was one of those books where I just wanted to rush home to read, loudly grumbling at any responsibilities that stole time away from reading.

    Brigid has not had an easy life. She has been an orphan, a midwife and a child bride and now at nearly 40 she is infertile and desperate to be a mother.

    She arrives on St Bridget’s Island off the coast of Ireland in the late 1950’s, an island that has always been part of Bridget’s life in the form of bed time stories told by her mother. Fantastical stories about fairies and a magic water well purported to heal the sick and help barren mothers.

    Bridget quickly finds out that the the islanders are not very friendly towards outsiders. And in the centre of island life are two sisters.

    Rose is beautiful, blessed with love and many children. Emer is her complete opposite and, worse still, she is cursed by the strange currents that run through her fingers. She is fiercely protective of her only son convinced that he will be stolen from her by the fairies.

    Emer and Bridget’s sexuality, identity and limits are tested and the story does not allow you to give your sympathy to only one person. No one is just good or bad.

    The magical realism was handled expertly and the island itself is beautiful yet dangerous. Both a refuge and a prison with plenty of room for darkness to take hold.

    I almost never read the author note at the end of books but this time it was worth it. She expands on the real island that this book is based upon and as an added bonus I learned about the real St Bridget along the way.

    Highly recommended for lovers of Irish folklore and magical realism.

  • Ann
    Jan 13, 2017

    This book deals with an island of people who still believe in the fairies and old ways. St. Bridget's has no electric, communication with the mainland and a strong sense of family and myths. This story wasn't what I expected and it was a chore getting to the end.

  • Emer (ALittleHaze)
    Feb 07, 2017

    Hmm... Do I read this?

    I typically hate reading books about Irish mythology because [begor and begorrah].... *sigh*

    However!!!

    This features a character by the name of Emer...

    I do like that name.

    I like it rather a lot.

    What can I say?

    I'm a blatant narcissist.

    *adds to TBR knowing I'll most likely despise it*