The Nature of a Pirate

The Nature of a Pirate

The third novel in the Stormwrack series, following a young woman's odyssey into a fantastical age-of-sail worldMarine videographer and biologist Sophie Hansa has spent the past few months putting her knowledge of science to use on the strange world of Stormwrack, solving seemingly impossible cases where no solution had been found before. When a series of ships within the...

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Title:The Nature of a Pirate
Author:A.M. Dellamonica
Rating:
ISBN:0765334518
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:368 pages

The Nature of a Pirate Reviews

  • Debbie
    Dec 16, 2016

    I must start by saying I'm so sorry to see this series end. There is still so much more that can be written and more for Sophie to do, but this was a trilogy. The Nature of a Pirate begins with Sophie regretfully taking responsibility for the criminal, Kev Lindman. She was given three choices, either let him be beheaded or sent into slavery or she had one last ridiculous plan. If she was to take Kev back to her father's homeland and claim to be engaged she would be considered an adult and be abl

    I must start by saying I'm so sorry to see this series end. There is still so much more that can be written and more for Sophie to do, but this was a trilogy. The Nature of a Pirate begins with Sophie regretfully taking responsibility for the criminal, Kev Lindman. She was given three choices, either let him be beheaded or sent into slavery or she had one last ridiculous plan. If she was to take Kev back to her father's homeland and claim to be engaged she would be considered an adult and be able to free him. There's magic and monsters involved. They see plenty of action and of course the more important story lines are resolved. I'm still hoping Dellamonica will go back and add just a little more to this very exciting adventure series.

  • Forestofglory
    Feb 07, 2017

    I didn't like this one quite as much as the rest of the series. There was less science, and almost no ecology, an aspect I loved in previous books. Also I was hoping for more explanation of the big world building mysteries than we got. Still Sophie is great character and I was glad to spend some more time with her and see the end of her story arc.

  • Michele
    Dec 13, 2016

    This was a thrill read from first to last...

  • Emily
    Feb 06, 2017

    A.M. Dellamonica's Hidden Sea Tales are quickly becoming one of my favorite Fantasy series. They're smart, well-written, full of lush imagery and wonderful characters, and to top it all of they're a Portal Fantasy.

    Sophie continues to be an excellent protagonist (despite what she may sometimes think), and the vigor with which she applies science to magical problems is extremely entertaining.

    More please.

  • Jen
    Jan 21, 2017

    Upon finishing this book, I went to the Goodreads reviews and said, "wait, what? This was the end of the series?" and sure enough, in the acknowledgements I saw that this was indeed a trilogy. There was definitely room for more, because while the book reached a good wrapping up point, there still seemed to be a lot of questions to be resolved. Then again, that kind of slightly messy ending is a bit like real life; there are always more questions and more things to be happening. Sophie has a futu

    Upon finishing this book, I went to the Goodreads reviews and said, "wait, what? This was the end of the series?" and sure enough, in the acknowledgements I saw that this was indeed a trilogy. There was definitely room for more, because while the book reached a good wrapping up point, there still seemed to be a lot of questions to be resolved. Then again, that kind of slightly messy ending is a bit like real life; there are always more questions and more things to be happening. Sophie has a future, in a way that characters in other book series don't always seem to have.

    This book has Sophie trying to set up her forensic science institute and trying to figure out what to do with a prisoner who turns out to have some complicated motivations for his destructive actions in a previous book. In the process, we get some interesting answers to longstanding questions in the book (such as whether this portal world involves time travel to far future Earth or travel to a parallel universe) and some good character and relationship development, most notably with Cly.

    All in all, this was a fun book in a fun series.

  • Danya
    Dec 09, 2016

    3.5 stars

    Sophie Hansa was adopted as a baby and never knew her biological parents, for good reason: they belong to another world. Stormwrack is similar to earth during the Age of Sail, but with significantly less land mass…and magic. Governed by the Fleet, a floating city comprised of hundreds of ships, Stormwrack is a place where people’s names are powerful ingredients in working spells or intentions; and it’s also a place where Sophie’s knowledge of science is scorned. Sucked into Stormwrack a

    3.5 stars

    Sophie Hansa was adopted as a baby and never knew her biological parents, for good reason: they belong to another world. Stormwrack is similar to earth during the Age of Sail, but with significantly less land mass…and magic. Governed by the Fleet, a floating city comprised of hundreds of ships, Stormwrack is a place where people’s names are powerful ingredients in working spells or intentions; and it’s also a place where Sophie’s knowledge of science is scorned. Sucked into Stormwrack against her will, Sophie gradually begins to fall in love with her biological parents’ home world and takes on a series of missions there.

    Secretive, deeply politically divided, and bound by rules of etiquette that Sophie considers old fashioned, Stormwrack is a fascinating world that I’ve really enjoyed learning about throughout the series. In THE NATURE OF A PIRATE, Dellamonica delves more deeply into the particulars of Stormwrack’s various cultures and practices, most notably the slave trade. Understandably, the slave trade is a bitter pill to swallow for both Sophie and her brother Bram (many Stormwrackers feel the same) but it plays a large role in the social hierarchy of Stormwrack. The siblings get up close and personal with slavers in this book, and the results are pretty spectacular…to say the least!

    Sophie also connects more deeply with her biological family and the Verdanni half of her heritage in THE NATURE OF A PIRATE, which was a treat to read about. The Verdanni are a powerful people in Stormwrack: they lay claim to one of the largest landmasses on Stormwrack and their agricultural practices have made them quite wealth. A matriarchal people, the Verdanni are ruled by the Allmother and celebrate women – but they also expect a lot from them. This means that Sophie’s relatives Beatrice, Verena, and Annela are pretty badass ladies who also have giant chips on their shoulders…much like Sophie herself.

    The character growth in THE NATURE OF A PIRATE is absolutely phenomenal, and as the star of the show, Sophie has really come into her own throughout the series. She’s more confident in her own abilities and intellect, more sure of her place in her family (both adopted and biological), and she’s also more experienced in the ways of Stormwrackers. I’ve also really enjoyed seeing Bram, Sophie’s brother, grow more assertive and stand up to Sophie when he thinks his big sister is trying to walk all over him. Of course, I’m also biased because Bram’s gay and y’all know I love a queer character… But he is really cool, I promise!

    With a satisfying yet slightly open-ended conclusion, THE NATURE OF A PIRATE is a strong instalment in a solid series about magic, family, finding yourself, and – of course – sailing. If you like books with fantastic PoC and queer representation, or you’re hoping to read more stories set at sea, then I recommend the Hidden Sea Tales series.

  • Bibliotropic
    Dec 16, 2016

    (Full review here:

    )

    Stormwrack is a world I could constantly — if you’ll excuse the pun — dive into and never be bored reading about. I love the characters, from Sophie’s headstrong intelligence to Garland’s reserved politeness to Verena’s desire to prove herself. They’re whole people, able to stand on their own and tell their own stories. I love the cultures built in the flooded world. I love the little linguistic quirks that get thrown in, pieces of a pu

    (Full review here:

    )

    Stormwrack is a world I could constantly — if you’ll excuse the pun — dive into and never be bored reading about. I love the characters, from Sophie’s headstrong intelligence to Garland’s reserved politeness to Verena’s desire to prove herself. They’re whole people, able to stand on their own and tell their own stories. I love the cultures built in the flooded world. I love the little linguistic quirks that get thrown in, pieces of a puzzle to solve. Dellamonica is a fantastically skilled writer, at the top of her game, and I can’t imagine her coming down from those heights any time soon. Do yourself a favour and pick up this series soon if you haven’t already. It’s absolutely worth the time you’ll spend reading it.

  • Kelsey Brennan
    Feb 04, 2017

    "She had never felt this before, this particular sense of happiness, of having eaten so much of a meal that she was bursting; it almost hurt."

    And so, our time with Sophie in Stormwrack comes to a close. This series seems designed specifically for me, hitting a bunch of my favourite conventions: portal fiction, pirates, secret families, intrigue, magic. Still, while I enjoyed all three books, they never quite resonated with me the way I expected them too.

    Sophie as a main character had an interes

    "She had never felt this before, this particular sense of happiness, of having eaten so much of a meal that she was bursting; it almost hurt."

    And so, our time with Sophie in Stormwrack comes to a close. This series seems designed specifically for me, hitting a bunch of my favourite conventions: portal fiction, pirates, secret families, intrigue, magic. Still, while I enjoyed all three books, they never quite resonated with me the way I expected them too.

    Sophie as a main character had an interesting progression, trying to find her place and reconcile two very different worlds, but some of her decisions also rang quite false to me. I also had to laugh during the sex scene; the language was, shall we say, purple, which felt especially out of place when sandwiched between Dellamonica's otherwise very practical writing style.

    Still, the magic system in Stormwrack remains fascinating, and I particularly liked the description of how mermaids are made and the religious aspects introduced in this book. I did also like how the mystery came together in the end, enough to resolve the story, but also leave room for future adventures.

  • Kate
    Feb 07, 2017

    CLY <3

    anyhoodles, i'm both sad and happy this is apparently the end of the trilogy-- love a good planned story arc, this is a super satisfying place to leave sophie et all, but damn, i'd love to see more of their future. DO sophie and garland ever tie the knot?? more cly! more beatrice!

    also i've VERY FREQUENTLY wanted to set two characters down and make them talk about their feelings, this was the first time i've seen it implemented in a book :D

  • Ari
    Feb 11, 2017

    So it took me the longest time to get into this book, and I couldn't figure out why I wasn't clicking with the characters or why I was so confused by where the characters were at the beginning of the book, and then I did find my groove with it and then I finished it and turned it over, and then it turned out that I had gone from book 1 to book 3 without stopping at the second book in this trilogy along the way

    So........................whoops, A.M. Dellamonica, I bungled that one pretty good

    By th

    So it took me the longest time to get into this book, and I couldn't figure out why I wasn't clicking with the characters or why I was so confused by where the characters were at the beginning of the book, and then I did find my groove with it and then I finished it and turned it over, and then it turned out that I had gone from book 1 to book 3 without stopping at the second book in this trilogy along the way

    So........................whoops, A.M. Dellamonica, I bungled that one pretty good

    By the end I did get really into it, and now I want to reread the trilogy as a whole, to make up for missing #2, and because when reading #1 I do remember I never quite clicked with the characters (which surprised me because I love fiction about siblings!!) or the setting (I think I just had a hard time keeping track of the details), but now that this book got its hooks in me I think I'll have a better time.

    I love all the family stuff in this book-- the thorny half-sibling step-sibling step-parent estranged-cousin loving-but-resentful-sibling shit. Sophie with Bram, with Verena, with Cly-- those were some of my favourite scenes. I love Sophie with Garland, too -- I had to get up and walk around a bit at one scene with them near the end, which is how you know a romance is effective. The ending and its tone worked so well for me too.

    One thing that surprised me about this series and is maybe why it took me forever to find my groove with it is Sophie and Bram's... scientific curiosity about this magical world: their determination to figure it out, and not figure it out in terms of the magic it uses, as happens in so many Oh I'm A Regular Person And Oh What Is This Fantastical Magical Realm I Have Stumbled Into stories, where the main characters find power by learning the rules that realm plays by (and breaking them as necessary with their outsiders' POV), but by bringing the scientific method to the magic world-- to catalogue, to test for DNA, to look at fossil records, to try to find where and what this magic world is and how it's connected to the regular world, to bring your DSLR to Narnia and document the sea serpents' mating habits. It's so interesting and it's such a good take on it, and I think its newness is what threw me-- I was expecting that Harry Potter pattern and never got it.

    So I definitely want to reread the series, and I'm sure I'll like it all the better when I'm not fighting against its core just out of sheer genre confusion, and when I actually remember to read the books in order.

    :B