Agent of Chaos

Agent of Chaos

How did Fox Mulder become a believer? How did Dana Scully become a skeptic? The X-Files Origins has the answers.The X-Files Origins: Agent of Chaos explores the teen years of Fox Mulder, the beloved character depicted in the cult-favorite TV show The X-Files. His story is set in the spring of 1979, when serial murder, the occult, and government conspiracy were highlighted...

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Title:Agent of Chaos
Author:Kami Garcia
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:320 pages

Agent of Chaos Reviews

  • ✿
    Feb 22, 2016

    OMG.

    MY HEART IS SO FUCKING HAPPY.

  • Ashley
    Feb 21, 2017

    UGHHHH I HAD MY WHOLE REVIEW WRITTEN AND MY BROWSER CRASHED AND NOW I'M GOING TO HAVE A TEMPER TANTRUM.

    K back from temper tantrum now.

    So I had this huge brilliant review* for this book, which I stupidly wrote in the review space here on Goodreads instead of somewhere that saved things periodically like I usually do, and upon being two sentences away from finishing it, my browser decided to to go non-responsive, crashed and deleted the whole thing. I will note that this ONLY ever happens to me wh

    UGHHHH I HAD MY WHOLE REVIEW WRITTEN AND MY BROWSER CRASHED AND NOW I'M GOING TO HAVE A TEMPER TANTRUM.

    K back from temper tantrum now.

    So I had this huge brilliant review* for this book, which I stupidly wrote in the review space here on Goodreads instead of somewhere that saved things periodically like I usually do, and upon being two sentences away from finishing it, my browser decided to to go non-responsive, crashed and deleted the whole thing. I will note that this ONLY ever happens to me while using Internet Explorer on computers that aren’t mine. Why does anyone have a computer that has nothing but IE? WHY. What terrible person makes these decisions? I hope they regret everything.

    So long story short I’m not writing that review again. That seems like torture. Instead I will sum it up in bullet points, from what I can remember:

    -Liked the secondary characters for the most part: Mulder’s friend Gimble and Gimble’s father, The Major (a conspiracy theorist). Also thought the murder was good, creepy and well thought out, although a bit too reliant on a forty-plus year old fantasy novel (if you’re planning on reading Michael Moorcock’s Elric Saga, don’t read this book; it spoils the ending of the series completely).

    -This wasn’t nearly as bad as its partner, the Scully book, but it didn’t quite capture Mulder’s voice. It also had some weird easter eggs that felt forced in, like Mrs. Mulder mentioning the vacuum from “Paper Hearts” while on the phone with Mulder, or the killer turning out to be Monty Propps at the end, the serial killer from season one’s “Young at Heart,” where it was mentioned that Mulder was the one who wrote the profile that originally captured him. Only, this book decides to have him write that profile at seventeen years old, without any training. I mean, come on. And he just so happens to get that profile to the FBI, and they like it? And give him future career networking opportunities? It’s just too much of a stretch.

    -The whole Phoebe thing was pointless. I spent the first 2/3 of this book being annoyed that Garcia had decided to have Mulder meet his old lover Phoebe (whom we met in season one’s “Fire”) when they were teenagers in Martha’s Vineyard, rather than at Oxford, and on top of that she was his “best friend,” and totally out of character. Eventually, I realized it was probably another Phoebe, and that conclusion turned out to be correct when her last name was revealed. But, come on, man. You can’t give a character the same name as one of your hero’s previous lovers, if that character is also a previous lover. How confusing and pointless it is. Also, she was just a pointless character to begin with, only there because in YA, the hero has to have a girl to pine over. This book would have been better without her entirely, and just focused on Mulder’s relationship with his strange but sweet friend Gimble instead.

    -I will accept that the Syndicate is involved in Mulder’s life because they were canonically involved in the show, and also the Cigarette Smoking Man is obsessed with Mulder. But it's still unacceptable for them to have been involved with Scully's life. (It's really dumb that Mulder went to Scully's extremely small town, a town which they go out of their way to mention isn't even on a map. If he had actually run into her, I would have lost it.)

    It was just okay. If they publish sequels (which I know they wanted to do), I won’t be reading them. And I don’t think they will, anyway. I don’t believe these have sold well at all (probably didn’t help that most of the new season wasn’t very good).

    Bottom line: if you were even going to bother trying this, don’t.

  • Tracy (Cornerfolds)
    Feb 23, 2016

    Read more of my reviews at

    !

    *Review to come!*

    **Anticipatory Comments**

    Wait... what? I adore The X-Files and YA fiction is my LIFE, but what is Mulder without Scully?? I'm hesitantly excited about this book...

  • Nancy The book junkie
    Jan 05, 2017

    Review to come!

  • Stacee
    Dec 30, 2016

    The X-Files was and still is one of my favorite shows and I absolutely couldn't resist reading teenage Mulder. And of course he's just as you would expect.

    Loved the story, the characters, and the creepy factor. It felt like an episode and I was captivated from the beginning.

    Onward to Scully's story!

    **Huge thanks to the publisher for sending me an early copy**

  • Leah
    Jan 01, 2017

    Fantastic.

    I watched The X-Files with my dad religiously growing up, so when I heard about Origins, I knew I needed them in my life. Reading about young Mulder and how he learned that there are no coincidences and why he should trust now one made my inner conspiracy theorist sing glory.

    Now on to read Scully's Origin. If it is half as good as this book, then it will be in good company.

  • Liza in the library
    Mar 10, 2017

    This was so amazing if you loved "The X-Files" TV show you really need to read this like now it is so cannon you guys i do recommend going into not knowing anything because the twists and turns really should come as surprise so I'm going just to end this review by saying read this read it now

  • Melissa ♥ Dog Lover ♥ Martin
    Jan 28, 2017

    I loved this book so much. I felt like the author captured a young, Fox Mulder, to a T! I could actually see the older Fox talking in every sentence. =)

    This follows the story of a young Mulder of seventeen. He's living with his father after the disappearance of his sister, Samantha. His parents had issues and they wanted Mulder to go to a different school for his senior year and then off to college.

    Mulder has a goofy friend named Gimble that plays D & D and I just loved

    I loved this book so much. I felt like the author captured a young, Fox Mulder, to a T! I could actually see the older Fox talking in every sentence. =)

    This follows the story of a young Mulder of seventeen. He's living with his father after the disappearance of his sister, Samantha. His parents had issues and they wanted Mulder to go to a different school for his senior year and then off to college.

    Mulder has a goofy friend named Gimble that plays D & D and I just loved him. He also has a best friend named Phoebe who comes down to stay with him for a bit.

    Mulder's dad is never around, he's always off working government stuff out of town and what not.

    Mulder gets all caught up in some disappearances of children. They seem to have disappeared the same way his sister did several years ago. He's obsessed with helping to find them and he brings his friends along for the ride.

    Gimble's dad used to work for the military until things . . . now he won't leave the house and he's obsessed with aliens and a book called "Stormbringer." He seems to be really crazy, BUT, he's not and I really liked him!

    Phoebe is super smart so it's easy for her to help Mulder who has the photographic memory (I wish I had one of those) and Gimble is a great help too. They get caught up in some major stuff.

    Mulder is on the heels of a killer or killers. He's being stalked by some peeps in a black car, one of which we know from the shows. He is going crazy over trying to find out who took his sister. And he made a decision about what he wants to do with his life.

    I'm not saying any more because I don't want to spoil it. <-- I say this a lot in my reviews but I have to because that's what I do. Lol Also, there are a lot more things going on in the book that I didn't even hint at so read it and love it!

    Anyway, I think anyone that loves the X-Files will enjoy this book even though it's young adult. It's super awesome and I look forward to reading about Scully.

    MY BLOG:

  • Michael Hicks
    Jan 18, 2017

    I have to admit, I was rather skeptical at the notion of a young adult The X-Files title when the Origins book, Agent of Chaos, was first announced. And although this was a fun audiobook, with several nods toward key components of The X-Files lore, I’m not convinced it’s an indispensable chapter to the series’ ever-growing mythology despite the entertainment value.

    Kami Garcia pre

    I have to admit, I was rather skeptical at the notion of a young adult The X-Files title when the Origins book, Agent of Chaos, was first announced. And although this was a fun audiobook, with several nods toward key components of The X-Files lore, I’m not convinced it’s an indispensable chapter to the series’ ever-growing mythology despite the entertainment value.

    Kami Garcia presents a young Fox Mulder, on the cusp of high school graduation and hunting for colleges, investigating the disappearance of several young children during spring break. Spring break gives Garcia a welcome opportunity to avoid the high school cliches and senior-year melodrama, while still dabbling in young love and PI-style murder investigations. The main impetus for Mulder’s involvement, though, stems from the abduction of his own sister five years prior, and the similarities between her disappearance and those of the current cases. Given Mulder’s personal history and obsession over Samantha’s mysterious kidnapping, his motivations here are natural and believable within the constraints of the story.

    It is still slightly jarring and a bit odd, though, to have a teenage Mulder as the focus, after so many years of an adult portrayal on television and other various media tie-ins. To suddenly have the franchise veer into Veronica Mars and The Hardy Boys territory requires a fair amount of suspension of disbelief, even on top of the series staples of alien encounters, monsters of the week, and government conspiracies.

    Another sticking point came in the portrayal of The Major, a father of one of Mulder’s friends. An ex-Air Force pilot, The Major is shell-shocked and reeling from the loss of his wife some years prior, and more than a little bit crazed with his obsession over conspiracies involving government cover-ups over alien life, all of which, he believes, is tied into secret revelations hidden in the novel, Stormbringer, written by fantasy author Michael Moorcock. The Major, as both a character and a plot device to draw Mulder into the role of Believer, is a bit too on the nose, particularly as, during their first meeting, The Major advises Mulder with well-trod nuggets like “The truth is out there.”

    Will Damron’s narration is solid and serves the story well, although I thought his reading of The Major’s dialogue was a bit too gruff, bordering on over the top. His handling of Mulder was sufficient, even if this youthful interpretation of soon-to-be infamous FBI’s Most Unwanted loses the deadpan delivery David Duchovny brought to the role (but perhaps that’s an aspect the character grew into over the following years). Agent of Chaos is well produced, with the audio quality coming through cleanly and the narration itself professionally handled.

    While I’m not completely sold that this YA experiment is completely integral to The X-Files canon, I am at least curious to see what the next book, a Scully-centric title called Devil’s Advocate by Jonathan Maberry, brings to the table. I’m also greatly relieved that the publisher didn’t attempt to retcon all of The X-Files history by creating a contrived young adult Mulder and Scully partnership. Giving each character their own separate books to chart their own paths toward their future FBI’s basement office is a smart move, even if, at this juncture, Origins feels largely unnecessary to the series itself.

    [Note: This audiobook was provided for review by the audiobookreviewer.com.]

  • Sara Michaels
    Jan 12, 2017

    Overall I thought this was a great book for young adult readers and a really neat way to get that age group into The X-Files. This book is easily read by fans and non-fans (there are some cute references throughout that fans will definitely appreciate, but will not distract or confuse non-fans) and is entertaining. Plus -- and I'm guessing this was intentional -- the similarities of the plot to the story of the David Meirhofer murder case (the first serial killer the FBI used "offender profiling

    Overall I thought this was a great book for young adult readers and a really neat way to get that age group into The X-Files. This book is easily read by fans and non-fans (there are some cute references throughout that fans will definitely appreciate, but will not distract or confuse non-fans) and is entertaining. Plus -- and I'm guessing this was intentional -- the similarities of the plot to the story of the David Meirhofer murder case (the first serial killer the FBI used "offender profiling" to catch) made for a tense read.

    My main complaint about the book is that it can be on the repetitive side at times. ***very light spoiler ahead*** For example, there's a scene in the story where Mulder is talking with an FBI agent and you read word for word the conversation between them. Then, a few pages later, Mulder repeats the entire conversation to his friend, word for word. ***end spoilers*** It's...kind of weird. Seems almost like filler, which is unnecessary, since the book itself is 320 pages long.

    And don't even get me started on the "love" scenes between Mulder and his friend Phoebe. Vom. I get that it's a young adult book so full-blown sex is often avoided, but come on. "They kissed until their lips were swollen"? Blech.

    In general, the character development was decent. Garcia did a nice job of converting the Mulder we all know and love to a believable version of him as a 17-year-old: slightly obnoxious, kind of a horndog and just a tad full-of-himself. Phoebe reminded me a little of a character that I would have thought was great; when I was 14. As an adult she felt like a cliche version of someone I would have thought was REALLY cool on Myspace. But then again, I'm not 14 anymore. Gimble's character was a little underdeveloped, but I liked him. I think maybe the author was trying to give the reader reminders of Langley with him.

    The ending was a bit disappointing. ***spoilers*** I really, really didn't like the sort of weird way the FBI agent threw himself at Mulder to compliment his intelligence. I find it hard to believe that the FBI would take a teenager's "notes" which are actually a "profile" and use them for their investigation so readily. It's like every teenager's wet dream to be validated in such an over-the-top, unbelievable way. I know I had stupid fantasies like that as a teen, but to see them on paper -- actually happening -- was a little too Tumblr-esque for my liking. I also find it hard to believe that Mulder had no idea what a profile was, considering he'd been obsessively reading books about murderer psychology and serial killers. Keep in mind this is 1979, and profiling had begun in the early 70's at that point. Maybe not as well-known, but it was still out there for nearly 10 years. ***end spoilers***

    It was a fun read, the book jacket and inner design was superb, and I'm looking forward to reading Devil's Advocate (the Scully story) as well.