Shadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE

Shadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE

In a dramatically different tale of espionage and conspiracy in World War II, Shadow Warriors of World War II unveils the history of the courageous women who volunteered to work behind enemy lines. Sent into Nazi-occupied Europe by the United States’ Office of Strategic Services (OSS) and Britain’s Special Operations Executive (SOE), these women helped establish a web of r...

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Title:Shadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE
Author:Gordon Thomas
Rating:
ISBN:1613730861
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:304 pages

Shadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE Reviews

  • Nissa
    Jan 14, 2017

    Engrossing read!

    I love WWII history and have always had a fascination with espionage so this book is the perfect mix. It's an account of many of the female spies during WWII. The stories of these amazing women read like a movie! Highly recommended.

    I liked the book so much that I purchased the book and audio version.

  • Roxanne
    Jan 20, 2017

    This is a Goodreads win review. I loved this book. It about the role that women palyed in WWII. These very brave women worked behind enemy lines as spy agents.

  • Readnponder
    Feb 26, 2017

    This book is full of interesting vignettes of women's roles in the work of the American Office of Strategic Services and the British Special Operations Executive. However, the percentage of the book focusing on women seemed to be 50% or less to me. Much more space was given to the origin and development of the two spy/resistance departments. I also found the structural organization of the book to be confusing. It jumped from the SOE to OSS and back and forth. It jumped from training exercises to

    This book is full of interesting vignettes of women's roles in the work of the American Office of Strategic Services and the British Special Operations Executive. However, the percentage of the book focusing on women seemed to be 50% or less to me. Much more space was given to the origin and development of the two spy/resistance departments. I also found the structural organization of the book to be confusing. It jumped from the SOE to OSS and back and forth. It jumped from training exercises to operations in various countries. Perhaps the two authors wrote separate chapters and then joined them together without sufficient segues.

  • victor harris
    Feb 12, 2017

    A high 4 rating for the story of women who faced great peril to operate undercover in Europe during the German occupation. They would act as saboteurs, contacts with the Resistance and other anti-Nazi operatives on the continent, and be a vital source for supplying information to the Allies in preparation for the D-Day invasion. Even the slightest slip-up or mishap could compromise them and some, along with their male counterparts, would be captured, tortured, and executed by the Nazis. The earl

    A high 4 rating for the story of women who faced great peril to operate undercover in Europe during the German occupation. They would act as saboteurs, contacts with the Resistance and other anti-Nazi operatives on the continent, and be a vital source for supplying information to the Allies in preparation for the D-Day invasion. Even the slightest slip-up or mishap could compromise them and some, along with their male counterparts, would be captured, tortured, and executed by the Nazis. The early parts of the narrative which included the extensive training preparation and coordination of the American and British spy services made for the best segment of the book. Unfortunately, despite their heroics, most of the women would not be adequately recognized or compensated for their efforts.

  • Kate
    Feb 26, 2017

    There were perhaps two chapters that actually focused on women and even those chapters talked a lot about men. This is not inherently bad, except that this is a book subtitled that it is about the women of the OSS and SOE. But three quarters of the book was really about the men behind the women and that last sentence doesn't make up for the neglect of focus or the rushing through these women's accomplishments that resulted.

  • Darlis
    Feb 27, 2017

    Not the best history I have ever read. Where's the source material list? Where are the citations? Who was interviewed by the author? Where are the details of the agents' assignments? Where is the analysis of the importance of the work?

    Yeah, I know, it sounds like it should be two stars. But the first couple of chapters on how MI6 and the OSS decided to assign women to France and how they should be trained was more interesting than the snippets about the agents who supported the Resistance durin

    Not the best history I have ever read. Where's the source material list? Where are the citations? Who was interviewed by the author? Where are the details of the agents' assignments? Where is the analysis of the importance of the work?

    Yeah, I know, it sounds like it should be two stars. But the first couple of chapters on how MI6 and the OSS decided to assign women to France and how they should be trained was more interesting than the snippets about the agents who supported the Resistance during WWII.

  • Slmstanley
    Mar 02, 2017

    Informal, chatty, and infinitely interesting, this book is a series of stories about the very brave women who parachuted into France to aid the Resistance in WWII. I found it absorbing, and was astonished by the ordinary bravery these women exhibited, but the disdain they faced from men. Their names should be household words.