Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?

Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?

Now available in Ecco’s Art of the Story series: a never-before-published collection of stories from a brilliant yet little known African American artist and filmmaker—a contemporary of revered writers including Toni Cade Bambara, Laurie Colwin, Ann Beattie, Amy Hempel, and Grace Paley—whose prescient work has recently resurfaced to wide acclaimHumorous, poignant, percepti...

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Title:Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?
Author:Kathleen Collins
Rating:
ISBN:0062484168
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:192 pages

Whatever Happened to Interracial Love? Reviews

  • Roxane
    Aug 19, 2016

    Elegant collection of stories. Fascinating to read fiction from a black woman about blackness in the early 1960s. There is a real edge, a slyness to many of the stories. And there is always a moment in each story where you realize the work Collins is doing beneath the skin of the story. The title story, in particular, is a masterpiece.

  • Steph
    Oct 18, 2016

    There is a rebellious undertone in Collins’ work threading itself through each story. From the daughter who commits the “unforgivable sin of (“Negro”) girlhood” by cutting her hair and therefore turning herself into “any other Negro,” to the man who takes his own life, to the black middle-class girl from New Jersey agrees to marry her white lover in 1963 as they both naively confront the south and racial segregation, Collins presents unconventional resolutions that are not tidy, but instead a fo

    There is a rebellious undertone in Collins’ work threading itself through each story. From the daughter who commits the “unforgivable sin of (“Negro”) girlhood” by cutting her hair and therefore turning herself into “any other Negro,” to the man who takes his own life, to the black middle-class girl from New Jersey agrees to marry her white lover in 1963 as they both naively confront the south and racial segregation, Collins presents unconventional resolutions that are not tidy, but instead a form of rebellion from what each of these characters are expected to be from the outside looking in. Each character is trying to find themselves and it’s a journey that requires the painful task of rejecting the external labels which have been arbitrarily placed on them from white-supremacy ideas of blackness to their own black bourgeois community’s. In these rebellious internal resolutions Collins is calling for a deep introspection of us all. Her work reminds us that we are humans first and our journeys toward seeking higher levels of emotional and intellectual awareness begin with our individual selves first.

    Read more at:

  • Maxwell
    Jan 03, 2017

    Kathleen Collins sadly died at the age of 46, never seeing her own work published. In fact, it went unpublished for close to 30 years after her death, and this collection was only recently released, bringing together stories from her archives. Her daughter sifted through her works and put together an anthology of stories looking at black lives, especially those of women dealing with life, love, and sexuality. They are incredibly modern stories; I mean that if you gave me this collection and told

    Kathleen Collins sadly died at the age of 46, never seeing her own work published. In fact, it went unpublished for close to 30 years after her death, and this collection was only recently released, bringing together stories from her archives. Her daughter sifted through her works and put together an anthology of stories looking at black lives, especially those of women dealing with life, love, and sexuality. They are incredibly modern stories; I mean that if you gave me this collection and told me it had been written in the past year, I wouldn't be surprised. Collins touches on universal experiences of love, infidelity, romance and identity, and writes about it in such a way that is incredibly relevant. Though I didn't love all of the stories, I found something to enjoy in all of them. I particularly liked "Only Once", "The Happy Family", "Lifelines," and "Dead Memories...Dead Dreams." Those alone are worth the price of admission.

  • Maggie
    Dec 07, 2016

    First book of 2017.

    --

    TFW Abbi Jacobson is the guest judge for Book of the Month Club:

  • Sara
    Jan 17, 2017

    This newly published collection of stories is a short read, not breathtaking or beautiful, but important because of the freshness and rawness of her perspective. It seems unfiltered, unedited, but Collins' appreciation of people for being the multi-faceted, unique people that they are is evident.

    The stories sometimes read more like journal entries, and even include self-aware stream of consciousness moments. The setting and historical context are important to the stories, but not foundational.

    In

    This newly published collection of stories is a short read, not breathtaking or beautiful, but important because of the freshness and rawness of her perspective. It seems unfiltered, unedited, but Collins' appreciation of people for being the multi-faceted, unique people that they are is evident.

    The stories sometimes read more like journal entries, and even include self-aware stream of consciousness moments. The setting and historical context are important to the stories, but not foundational.

    In her own unconventional and sometimes strange ways, Collins normalizes intellectual introspection, not as a woman or as a person of color, but as a human.

  • Book of the Month
    Dec 01, 2016

    THE VIBE OF 1960S – ONE WOMAN’S TIME CAPSULE

    BY JUDGE ABBI JACOBSON

    At this point in time, I’m finding myself frustrated, concerned, lost and confused at the world around me. It seems like we’re all searching for answers and solutions and trying to find voices that ease our pain and make us feel less alone, even as we take extra care to be open to different points of view.

    Whatever Happened to Interracial Love? felt like I dug up a secret time capsule from the 1960s and opened it to find a collecti

    THE VIBE OF 1960S – ONE WOMAN’S TIME CAPSULE

    BY JUDGE ABBI JACOBSON

    At this point in time, I’m finding myself frustrated, concerned, lost and confused at the world around me. It seems like we’re all searching for answers and solutions and trying to find voices that ease our pain and make us feel less alone, even as we take extra care to be open to different points of view.

    Whatever Happened to Interracial Love? felt like I dug up a secret time capsule from the 1960s and opened it to find a collection of stories that made me feel. I think that’s what we look for in all content really, stories and pieces of other people’s experiences that make us feel. Sad, sexy, hopeful and honest characters fill Kathleen Collin’s beautiful book. And even though these stories were written decades ago, the issues and frustrations of her characters’ lives mimic where we are right now. Strong, bold, black women fill the pages, reminiscing on an important time in American history, much of which still holds true today.

    Every story shifts tone and point of view in a way that keeps you on your toes as a reader—wondering not only what’s next for each character, but what might be in store for you as well. Cinematic, visual, erotic, gentle and poetic are words that come to mind as I swirl around this collection.

    I would recommend this book to anyone looking for slivers of hope and beauty and detail. It’s for anyone who’s yearning for something, looking to get lost in other’s journeys to find themselves, immerse themselves in other’s regrets for a moment. I had never heard of Kathleen Collins before diving into her stories, and I later learned that this collection was discovered by her daughter many years after Kathleen’s death. Even so, her smart prose is specific and always changing, like she was constantly experimenting with who she was herself as a writer. I found her style immensely inspiring as a creator and as a woman.

  • Shirleen R
    Dec 31, 2016

    4.5 - After Mar 25, 2017 reread: My favorite stories:"The Uncle", 'Only Once", Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?", " "Lifelines, "Dead Memories.. Dead Dreams" , and oddly enough, "Documentary Style"

    Kathleen Collins has a magnificent ear for dialogue whose humor felt light and natural, even when her intense subject wracks her narrators with pain. For example: Miriam and Ricardo's back and forth in "When Love Withers All of Life Cries". Collins alternates two lovers' memories of their courts

    4.5 - After Mar 25, 2017 reread: My favorite stories:"The Uncle", 'Only Once", Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?", " "Lifelines, "Dead Memories.. Dead Dreams" , and oddly enough, "Documentary Style"

    Kathleen Collins has a magnificent ear for dialogue whose humor felt light and natural, even when her intense subject wracks her narrators with pain. For example: Miriam and Ricardo's back and forth in "When Love Withers All of Life Cries". Collins alternates two lovers' memories of their courtship and its demise. Her playwright's ear crafts a conversation that flows easily, until one lover hurts the other with memory. Then, quick, pivot, withdraw. (ex. Ricardo in "voice dry as a bon"e)

    Upon rereading I treasured also Kathleen Collin's style of saying without saying, she has the poet's gift of compression. In "Only Once," a brief story about a lover whose taste for risk intoxicates and seduces, until the

    My sole complaint is the way Kathleen Collins expresses her Francophilia. She incorporate French language, destination cities, food and cultural flourishes in several of her short stories. Her French objects signify a particular taste and comfort in high-class lifestyle. Never does Collins vary how she represents Afro-Franco sensibilities -- no indigent black migrants from Haiti or Cameroon, don't appear in her stories. Nor do any exquisite, French objects extracted via subjugating African subjects betray their colonial pillaging history . I do wonder if today Collins would revise or complicate this tic, .

    Perversely, the character to whom I related up until he commits a violent, unconscionable act is the black cameraman in "Documentary Style". He is the underdog artist who fights doggedly against white authority for ownership and credit over his creative project. He goes so far as to endanger another's creation to preserve his own, which sounds noble in fiction until I read horrified he went

    far. . I will recommend this collection to others. Will put Kathleen Collins's film

    on my watch-list to see later this year.

  • Simon
    Jan 29, 2017

    Just finished this. A pretty damn appropriate book to be reading right now. An incredible collection of short stories from the 1960's that feel current and poignant. They all also have several ways in which they could be read and each has a little twist to surprise you. Incredible. Do read.

  • Barbara
    Mar 15, 2017

    This collection of quiet, thoughtful stories is excellent. They offer an unvarnished picture of life in the 1960s, a time of unrest that straddled the ages. I happened to read the stories while I was also reading John Lewis's March Trilogy, and they are a wonderful complement to each other.

    Collins offers the perspective of an African American woman, yet never letting race be the entire story. The stories are also about friendship, love, family, and making your way in a changing world.

    I particu

    This collection of quiet, thoughtful stories is excellent. They offer an unvarnished picture of life in the 1960s, a time of unrest that straddled the ages. I happened to read the stories while I was also reading John Lewis's March Trilogy, and they are a wonderful complement to each other.

    Collins offers the perspective of an African American woman, yet never letting race be the entire story. The stories are also about friendship, love, family, and making your way in a changing world.

    I particularly love her descriptive language. For example, she says of one character "His children had grown up inside his sorrow." Or of the times, "It is a time that calls forth the most picturesque of metaphors, for we are swimming along in the mythical underbelly of America . . . there where it is soft and prickly, where you may rub your nose against the grainy sands of illusion and come up bleeding."

    I'm so glad this previously hidden work has come to light!

  • Colleen Fauchelle
    Mar 09, 2017

    I am not very good at reading short stories. I personally like reading long stories.

    But I really enjoyed these stories.

    They show what happens behind closed doors.

    They show you need courage to Live

    They show you need courage to love

    They show you need courage to stand up for what you believe in.

    They show no matter what colour we are, We need love, support and acceptance.

    I liked the first story 'Interiors' I read it out to my Husband and he said it was poetical.

    Just Beautiful.