Tomie: Complete Deluxe Edition

Tomie: Complete Deluxe Edition

The complete classic horror series, now available in a single deluxe volume. Murdered again and again, one girl always comes back for Tomie Kawakami is a femme fatale with long black hair and a beauty mark just under her left eye. She can seduce nearly any man, and drive them to murder as well, even though the victim is often Tomie herself. While one lover seeks to...

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Title:Tomie: Complete Deluxe Edition
Author:Junji Ito
Rating:
ISBN:1421590565
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:752 pages

Tomie: Complete Deluxe Edition Reviews

  • Rachel
    Feb 06, 2017

    In some ways I feel bad for Tomie, because she is always getting killed and chopped up. But at the same time I hate her for the way she is. In some stories it seems like she wants to be a normal human, but then she is reminded of what she is when men want to kill her. One of the things that stood out to me is how so many characters start to get raccoon eyes when they're around her for long periods of time, as if just being around her is draining their energy.

    Despite that Tomie is always getting

    In some ways I feel bad for Tomie, because she is always getting killed and chopped up. But at the same time I hate her for the way she is. In some stories it seems like she wants to be a normal human, but then she is reminded of what she is when men want to kill her. One of the things that stood out to me is how so many characters start to get raccoon eyes when they're around her for long periods of time, as if just being around her is draining their energy.

    Despite that Tomie is always getting killed, I just cannot blame her no matter how manipulative she is. In real life I would not want a woman to die just because she has to be cruel to survive (I don't think that's why Tomie does what she does, but in real life that might be the case). So even if Tomie was real, I would not want to see her die even if she called me ugly or put me down in some other way.

  • Persephone
    Oct 14, 2016

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I love the Tomie stories, ^_^ totally buying this the moment its released

  • Derek Parker
    Jan 02, 2017

    These are early stories from Ito, a little rougher (both art and especially story) than you'll find in Uzimaki and Gyo. Would I call this a short-story cycle? In a way, yes, but the stories hang together in a way where there's not much progression of character, setting, or context. Some of the stories, especially the ones that are more overtly interconnected, stand out among the rest.

  • Jedi JC Daquis
    Dec 31, 2016

    Just in case you have missed it, Viz Media released three compendiums of Junji Ito's works: Gyo, Uzumaki, and the newest one, Tomie.

    Viz Media's Tomie compiles Ito's 14-year work in this beautifully bound tome of horror. To give you a background about this episodic manga's main character, just remember these four things about her:

    1. Tomie can seduce about any man she meets. These men will do anything just to get her.

    2. These men will ultimately want to kill her, often times chop her to bits.

    3. Bu

    Just in case you have missed it, Viz Media released three compendiums of Junji Ito's works: Gyo, Uzumaki, and the newest one, Tomie.

    Viz Media's Tomie compiles Ito's 14-year work in this beautifully bound tome of horror. To give you a background about this episodic manga's main character, just remember these four things about her:

    1. Tomie can seduce about any man she meets. These men will do anything just to get her.

    2. These men will ultimately want to kill her, often times chop her to bits.

    3. But Tomie almost cannot die. She heals most of her nonfatal wounds very fast.

    4. Whenever a body part is chopped off of her, that part spawns another living Tomie.

    When these four things are combined, a genuinely eerie cycle of gore, murders and tons and tons of bitching Tomies.

    Tomie's stories are told in chapters, vaguely connected with each other. I can even say that it is a collection of standalone short stories that have a beginning act, a second act and always a horrific conclusion. This book gets its strength from the harrowing details of Junji Ito's illustrations, giving it a uniquely dark psychological feel of a world totally ruled by this girl Tomie. Like his other works, Tomie gives the readers an uneasy feel of a large-scale, town-wide claustrophobia where everybody is trapped in this seemingly insurmountable problem. This theme can be seen in his other works Gyo and Uzumaki.

    Collecting more than a decade of Ito's works, a reader can also see how the author gradually hones his crafts through the years. The only downside of it is that there is no story development at all. The chapters are good by themselves but they really do not add up to something that can be a worthy conclusion of the whole series. Like how do we stop this girl from invading and multiplying, or how to stop her from luring men to their demise. The last chapter offers tiny bit of resolution but nothing is really resolved at all. I think what Tomie needs is a protagonist. Someone who will be our eyes of the story's progression and the key as to how Tomie can be stopped.

    I recommend this Junji Ito manga if you are really into horror stuff. It is nicely bound and has some very disturbing imagery inside.

  • Orrin Grey
    Dec 30, 2016

    While

    is probably Junji Ito's masterpiece to date, and while I don't really like the

    stories as much as much of his other work, it's still hard to deny that Tomie may be his most enduring creation, and not just because she's been around the longest. Tomie is clearly a metaphor, though what

    seems much harder to pin down, and changeable from one story to another. While books like

    and

    have a broader vision--even if

    goes through a series of vignettes and cul-de-

    While

    is probably Junji Ito's masterpiece to date, and while I don't really like the

    stories as much as much of his other work, it's still hard to deny that Tomie may be his most enduring creation, and not just because she's been around the longest. Tomie is clearly a metaphor, though what

    seems much harder to pin down, and changeable from one story to another. While books like

    and

    have a broader vision--even if

    goes through a series of vignettes and cul-de-sacs to reach it--the

    stories only ever tie together thematically, and through the presence, in one form of another, of their titular... well, whatever Tomie is.

    While characters occasionally recur and narrative through lines do crop up, there's never the sense of one overarching story that you get from

    ,

    , and some others. This is both a strength and, I'm sure, for some people a weakness.

    I'd already read all of the Tomie stories in their previous incarnations, but it's great to have them all collected in one huge doorstop of a volume, especially since it looks so good alongside the recent Viz reissues of

    and

    . Now if they can just package up a bunch of Ito's unrelated, stand-alone stuff I will be a happy consumer indeed.

  • Christian Laforet
    Jan 22, 2017

    Geez, Junji Ito is one twisted dude! I’ve been a fan since stumbling across Gyo some years ago (which lead me to the man’s masterpiece, Uzumaki) and have been eyeballing his other work ever since. The complete Tomie collection comes out at a good time. Ito’s newest work, Fragments of Horror, was a rather disappointing let down for me and I needed something to remind myself why I consider him one of the most interesting and unique horror writers working today.

    First things first, this book is mad

    Geez, Junji Ito is one twisted dude! I’ve been a fan since stumbling across Gyo some years ago (which lead me to the man’s masterpiece, Uzumaki) and have been eyeballing his other work ever since. The complete Tomie collection comes out at a good time. Ito’s newest work, Fragments of Horror, was a rather disappointing let down for me and I needed something to remind myself why I consider him one of the most interesting and unique horror writers working today.

    First things first, this book is made up of work that Ito has completed over a long period of time. Because of that, you will notice a big (huge, actually) jump in quality, both in art and writing the deeper into the book you go.

    What you get in this collection are a bunch of short stories revolving around the titular femme fatale, Tomie. Basically, Tomie is beautiful nightmare. She drives all men who meet her into a murderous state, resulting in them loving her so much, they have to cut her into pieces.

    If you haven’t read Junji Ito before, you might be thinking, that sounds really weird. So for those who haven’t read his stuff in the past, let me just say, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

    You see, Tomie can regenerate from anything…ANYTHING! Cut her in half? You’ll just make two of her. And she’s mean, really really mean.

    Now, a normal person would come up with all kinds of ideas that would probably work perfectly well with the Tomie premise, but like I said when I started this review, Junji Ito is a twisted man, and his ideas are not even remotely normal. Each of the Tomie stories, even those that stick to familiar horror tropes, come off feeling like something new and crazy. Junji Ito’s world is a very scary place.

    So, as you can tell, I loved the book. I also have to mention that Ito is a hell of an artist. The art is a bit clunky at the beginning of the collection, but what’s great about this book is that you can see his style evolve with each new story until he finally settles in to being the great artist we know today.

    If you do read this book, and are looking for more insanity from Ito, make sure to check out Gyo and Uzumaki (both available as collected editions as well).

  • Quentin
    Jan 11, 2017

    I quite enjoyed Uzumaki, Junji Ito's strange and terrifying epic of a town infested with and ultimately consumed by spirals. It was weird, and beautifully rendered, and even translated into English, beautifully written. Tomie is as strange and gorgeous, but I was so bothered by its implications that I can't recommend it as emphatically.

    This story focuses on a girl, named Tomie, who entrances any man that she meets and ultimately works them into such a frenzy that they kill her and dismember her

    I quite enjoyed Uzumaki, Junji Ito's strange and terrifying epic of a town infested with and ultimately consumed by spirals. It was weird, and beautifully rendered, and even translated into English, beautifully written. Tomie is as strange and gorgeous, but I was so bothered by its implications that I can't recommend it as emphatically.

    This story focuses on a girl, named Tomie, who entrances any man that she meets and ultimately works them into such a frenzy that they kill her and dismember her. However, she also is seemingly immortal, and each fragment of her thus produced grows into a new version of her. There isn't even really an overarching story (as there is in Uzumaki). Rather, its told as a series of vignettes. The story jumps around between a wide variety of characters who intersect with Tomie. Most go mad, or die, or meet an otherwise sticky end. Tomie likewise is not really a character herself; when she does speak, it's to selfishly demand expensive gifts or to ridicule those around her as unattractive, stupid, or worthless.

    And here we get to the problem of the book--I feel like this is a male fever dream about violence against women. Here the titular character is inescapably beautiful, petulant, and demanding of attention...and it is these qualities that lead men to sadistically murder her and chop her up. A woman who embodies the worst sexist stereotypes forces men to do violence to her (and to others, in some cases). Men who beat women, or rape them, or otherwise abuse them, frequently draw on such stereotypes as justifications. Maybe Ito thought he was writing a satire--certainly there are comedic elements in the story, as when (in one vignette) a group of men are so entranced by Tomie that they pile on to what they think is her body and carve each other up in a fight over her while she escapes with another man. But for this book to be a satire, someone would need to question the stereotypical idea that women's behavior is the cause of their own violation. And no one does that anywhere in the book. If Ito is assuming his readers should already have dispelled that idea from their head, he is likewise assuming that the cultural pool of stereotypes from which he drew Tomie is not pernicious and broadly embraced. And I don't think he's right.

    I can't knock Ito's talent--the art and story are rich and compelling as with Uzumaki. But I couldn't shake the feeling that this was just an excuse to show women being dismembered because they deserved it.

  • Ben Varner
    Feb 17, 2017

    First book to disrupt my sleep in years. Loved it so much I ripped it to pieces and burned the shredded pages. But a draft came down the chimney and scattered the ashes throughout my library. When I went to clean it up, however, there was no ash. Some nights later though, every book on every shelf had become the Tomie book! That night I awoke to sounds drawing me to the library - it was my name being called over and over! So I burned down my house and wandered into the woods nearby, taking up re

    First book to disrupt my sleep in years. Loved it so much I ripped it to pieces and burned the shredded pages. But a draft came down the chimney and scattered the ashes throughout my library. When I went to clean it up, however, there was no ash. Some nights later though, every book on every shelf had become the Tomie book! That night I awoke to sounds drawing me to the library - it was my name being called over and over! So I burned down my house and wandered into the woods nearby, taking up residence in a cave, far from all books everywhere. But even the winds must have been against me, as they clearly moaned my name in the cave. It drew me out, and to my horror the leaves of the surrounding trees had become leaves of the Tomie book! Even now I am gathering kindling for one last great conflagration...

  • Ignacio Senao f
    Feb 05, 2017

    Mis sentimientos de él son del mejor creador de terror en todos los ámbitos. Adora su perfecta mezcla de originalidad, asco, misterio y sorpresa. Eso da el más puro terror. Esta obra: Tomie, muestra sus comienzos y defectos. Es muy buena, que no os engañe la valoración, pero por debajo de las demás. En sí todo es novedoso, el punto de partida de todas las historias que compone este ómnibus es el de una chica (Tomie) que no se sabe de dónde viene, solo se sabe: es preciosa, manipuladora, le gusta

    Mis sentimientos de él son del mejor creador de terror en todos los ámbitos. Adora su perfecta mezcla de originalidad, asco, misterio y sorpresa. Eso da el más puro terror. Esta obra: Tomie, muestra sus comienzos y defectos. Es muy buena, que no os engañe la valoración, pero por debajo de las demás. En sí todo es novedoso, el punto de partida de todas las historias que compone este ómnibus es el de una chica (Tomie) que no se sabe de dónde viene, solo se sabe: es preciosa, manipuladora, le gusta el fuagrás y caviar, y sobre todo que se regenera en ella, le cortas un dedo y de ese dedo crecerá otra Tomie y el dedo le crecerá otra vez. Con esta premisa abarcara muchas historias que esta capacidad de la chica pondrá situaciones interesantes y escabrosas. Es inmortal, puedes trocearle, hacerla puré… que saldrán miles de ellas de esos trocitos.

    Es interesante, pero cuando dedicas más de 700 páginas a lo mismo: cansa. Además, no he llegado a sentir miedo ni asco.

  • Ian Sacks
    Jan 30, 2017

    Junji Ito is one of my favorite comics artists of any nationality, and Tomie, an anthology of loosely connected horror one-shots spanning the entirety of his career, is likely my favorite batch of output in his catalogue.

    One of my favorite things about Ito, other than his crisp, soap-opera-comic-esque art and absolute control over pacing and tension, is that despite working in horror, a historically misogynistic genre, he always brings a sense of tact to his work. So even when he deals with a co

    Junji Ito is one of my favorite comics artists of any nationality, and Tomie, an anthology of loosely connected horror one-shots spanning the entirety of his career, is likely my favorite batch of output in his catalogue.

    One of my favorite things about Ito, other than his crisp, soap-opera-comic-esque art and absolute control over pacing and tension, is that despite working in horror, a historically misogynistic genre, he always brings a sense of tact to his work. So even when he deals with a concept I'd initially recoil at -- case in point Tomie, whose monster and villain is a young woman able to control those around her and goad them into killing her again and again, from which she horrifically recovers and duplicates -- he's able to take material that seems like a recipe for crass exploitation in anyone else's hands and produce something whimsical and strange and occasionally affecting. Much of the horror here stems from unflinching portrayals of abuse: emotional abuse Tomie visits upon her victims; physical abuse visited upon her and others primarily by entitled, not wholly excusable men. It helps that Tomie is very much a fleshed out, well-characterized villain, and several likable protagonists are similarly uniquely rendered, though not anglicized, women. There's no Madonna-whore complex going on, though no one familiar with Ito should expect one. As is also typical of Ito, there's plenty of genuinely funny humor woven in and out of the strangeness and misery.

    In terms of absolutely stellar creative horror, as well as control over comics as a craft, I can't recommend Ito and Tomie enough. The only thing that prevents this from being five stars is that I can't imagine it appealing to anyone who isn't into the particular genre or medium. And, as is also typical of Ito's works, it walks the razor's edge between simply being good creative horror and feeling like it has something thematically urgent to say, and I find myself constantly wishing it would just take one step over.