The Legend of Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Origins

The Legend of Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Origins

A new 9-issue miniseries with a story written and pencilled by Renae De Liz ("The Last Unicorn")! In the beginning, there was only chaos. But Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, saw a better future--and eventually, her daughter would be destined to bring that new world to life. Before her ultimate fate unfolds, though, Diana of Themyscira must learn the important lessons of a...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Legend of Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Origins
Author:Renae De Liz
Rating:
ISBN:1401267289
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:350 pages

The Legend of Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Origins Reviews

  • Thomas Maluck
    Jun 19, 2016

    Librarians: stock this on your comics shelves when it comes out in print December 2016! This is the version of Wonder Woman that young eyes can read, that goes on an adventure, that advocates compassion and sparing one's enemy, that celebrates women sticking up for themselves and each other.

  • Yves
    Oct 12, 2016

    It's rare that I still give a comic book 5 stars these days. Most superhero comics are so generic and repetitive that they are usually pretty boring.

    Renae de Liz delivers a wonderful reimagining of Wonder Woman's origin story without changing too much. The art is beautiful, the story is funny and empowering and the artist manages to capture the feel of the era quite well. The cameos also work.

    Whether you are a long time DC Fan or new to the game, you should give this one a chance!

  • Shadowdenizen
    Sep 26, 2016

    Yes, the origin story of Wonder Woman has been done may times over the years.

    And yes, they're even rebooting the origin story before this mini-series is even completed!

    That said, this 9-issue minseries is nonetheless a stirring addition to the Wonder Woman mythos (canon or not). It's a straightforward, action-packed series that traces WOnders WOmans origins up thru WWII.

    Story and artwork work hand-in-hand together to create an effort that's greater than the sum of it's parts.

  • Andrés
    Oct 01, 2016

    This is not really a review of the hardcover edition of

    since it releases on December. However, I have bought and read every single digital issue on Comixology and thought it best to review the series as a whole rather than each issue individually. Should the hardcover edition include additional material I will be sure to update this review to reflect that.

    On to

    then. It was amazing, it was everything I could have ever hoped to read in an ori

    This is not really a review of the hardcover edition of

    since it releases on December. However, I have bought and read every single digital issue on Comixology and thought it best to review the series as a whole rather than each issue individually. Should the hardcover edition include additional material I will be sure to update this review to reflect that.

    On to

    then. It was amazing, it was everything I could have ever hoped to read in an origin story about Wonder Woman! Perhaps I should've prefaced that by admitting I'm not very knowledgeable on Wonder Woman as I am other DC heroes (e.g.: Green Lantern). However, it is hard not to be aware of her and her story seeing as she's part of DC's Trinity, together with heavy-weights Superman and Batman. So I knew the broad strokes, that she was an Amazon warrior, that she wielded the lasso of truth, that she had an invisible airplane, that she had powers that rivaled Superman's, and even that Linda Carter played her on TV once. I even saw a few Justice League episodes with her that hinted at a possible relationship with Batman that (sadly) never materialized (as far as I know).

    With DC and Warner Bros teaming up to bring the Trinity to life (a preview of which we saw in

    ) I decided I could probably do with knowing a little more about her and started with Azzarello's New 52 take on the character. It came highly recommended by my local comics dealer for its emphasis on Greek mythology grounded in reality, not to mention its artwork and the fact that Azzarello was involved in it, so I gave it a shot. I ended up liking it quite a bit, with its (reasonable) twist to Wonder Woman's origin story and her action-packed clash with the Greek Gods. For better or worse though, its gritty take on the character and the world around her left me wanting something else, something more uplifting and colourful perchance.

    So it was that I eventually stumbled upon

    . First thing that intrigued me: the inclusion of the word, "legend," what I took (and later confirmed) to be a take on Wonder Woman's mythological origin. Checking the sample pages I was also pleasantly surprised to find that the artwork not only looked beautiful but it was also vibrant with colour. What probably closed the deal for me was that we'd be able to read about Diana as a young girl and how she grew up to be this incredible warrior that the world came to know as Wonder Woman. Even then I bought one or two issues to test the waters. As I finished reading one issue I moved on to the next and soon ran out so I went back to Comixology and bought some more. That process repeated itself until the series' end. I simply couldn't and wouldn't put down this story as it had everything I wanted it to have. It had the mythology woven in such a way that reminds you of an old, beautiful yet sad tale, like one of the many told by Tolkien's elves back in Rivendell. It had the story of a very young Diana, struggling with being a good daughter while figuring out her place in life. It had a charming pilot by the name of Steve Trevor who feels incredibly drawn to her; a wonderful group of gals known as the Holliday Girls, led by singer, best friend, and force-of-nature Etta Candy; it had Wonder Woman rising up to help the Allies win in World War II... I could go on.

    There are bad guys here too, mind you, as the Gods decide to play the game of Champions once more, with decidedly higher stakes that affect not only Themyscira but the world at large as well. Yet perhaps what I like best about

    is its classic approach to the fight between light and dark, between good and evil. We live in a time where "dark and gritty" has been embraced by many as the rule to survive, no matter the media. We saw it in

    sure but we've also seen it with DC's take on its heroes during New 52 (even before that with the aptly-named

    ). Not for nothing Geoff Johns highlighted "hope" and "optimism" as key points of DC's latest event,

    . If I could be so bold, I would direct him to take a look at this series as I believe it embodies both the hope and optimism that DC has been lacking for a while now. This is not to say Diana doesn't struggle in this story 'cause she does, a lot, but you know there's Etta and the Holliday Girls to back her up, that Steve will always be there for her, that there's always hope, that your friends will be there for you, and that, yes, there are forces of darkness out there but there are forces of light as well that will always shine through.

    Damn, I got so caught up in trying to explain why I liked this series so much that I didn't talk a whole lot about the story, did I? As I said, we watch Diana grow and become the Amazon warrior we know as she trains with Alcippe (I was close to writing Antiope; that would've been weird), the Captain of the Guard of Themyscira and one of Queen Hippolyta's closest friends. This is something that saddens the Queen as, naturally, she would prefer to protect her daughter as a mother would, and she's willing to sacrifice anything to do so. This opening arc on Themyscira is one of my favourites as, in a few scenes, we get to understand the extent of the ache and sorrow in Hippolyta's heart. Steve Trevor is also cleverly introduced as a pawn in the Gods' game of chess but is saved from that fate by Diana. Their interactions throughout ringed very sincere (unlike that other encounter in Earth One *shudders*) and Steve came across as a very down-to-Earth and affable guy.

    Eventually we move on to our next setting for the remainder of the series: 1940s Earth. It is here that Diana meets Etta and the Holliday Girls, learns that the world is currently at war, and that the Gods may have a hand in this. Etta is a great friend to Diana from day one, acting as her guide in this new world and providing occasional comic relief as she butts heads with her archenemy, Pamela Smutters, all across the globe, for Diana and Etta soon move from the US and join the war effort on France. It is here that Diana rises as Wonder Woman, helping the Allied troops against the forces of darkness led by the Duke of Deception. It is here also that she briefly loses her "powers" as she is presented with a cruel choice by the Gods. This is probably the only aspect I could criticize as I felt not much time had passed before Diana was back on the power saddle again. That and I wish she had given poor Trevor more of a chance but maybe Gaea had one last trick up her sleeve, who knows.

    Kudos to how the story bridges the mythology with the larger DC universe. The Green Lantern fan in me particularly appreciated the reference. There are also a few easter-egg appearances from other well-known characters of the DC universe that were welcome surprises.

    I love this comic to bits as you can probably tell. It is the perfect starting point for people who want to get started on Wonder Woman and, as a bonus, is entirely self-contained. I'd warrant a guess that even fans of Wonder Woman will strive to find a place in their library for it. I know I do, probably next to Grant Morrison's

    or Geoff Johns'

    (two of my favourite DC titles).

    is truly deserving of the word "legend" and has become my personal canon. I am personally thrilled that Renae De Liz has been greenlit for Volume 2 of the series and can't wait to see where she takes the story and characters next.

    After all, the Legend of Wonder Woman has only just begun.

  • Sesana
    Dec 29, 2016

    Drags a bit in the middle section (which may have something to do with this being short digital comics to begin with), but is otherwise a very good look at Wonder Woman's origin, placing her in World War II. This is probably the first take on Etta Candy that I really liked, partly because she keeps some of the spirit of her original incarnation. I absolutely loved the art, enough that I rounded up my star rating.

  • Amber
    Dec 30, 2016

    I've seen a lot of negative remarks as to how "wordy this is for a comic" and I need to point out that it's not a comic, it's a graphic novel. Graphic novels will be more "wordy". There are distinct differences between the two and that needs to be understood in order to judge this correctly. I feel some of the reviews (mostly outside of Goodreads) come from younger band wagon jumpers who think they understand the comic world because Hollywood has made it seem "cooler" to be a DC and/or Marvel lo

    I've seen a lot of negative remarks as to how "wordy this is for a comic" and I need to point out that it's not a comic, it's a graphic novel. Graphic novels will be more "wordy". There are distinct differences between the two and that needs to be understood in order to judge this correctly. I feel some of the reviews (mostly outside of Goodreads) come from younger band wagon jumpers who think they understand the comic world because Hollywood has made it seem "cooler" to be a DC and/or Marvel loving nerd. Please. Get out of here and go read an original comic.

    Now to my thoughts. First and foremost, I liked the artwork. I personally feel Wonder Woman should always be painted in bright bold colors (I'm thinking like John Romita Jr type of bold). She needs to stand out of the pages. I've been crazy about Wonder Woman since I was at least 8. I know what I like.

    The writing itself may not be a poetic descriptive masterpiece but it is well done. It told the story, with a lot of words! I don't care how many times her story is told, I'll always get sucked back in.

    I enjoyed curling up to this with coffee steaming from my yellow Wonder Woman mug, naturally. Costume may or may not have been involved.

  • Anne
    Feb 24, 2017

    3.5 stars

    The artwork here is just

    . Really. I think I probably enjoyed looking at the pictures far more than I did reading the story.

    Not that the story is

    . It isn't.

    Worst case scenario, the story is a bit draggy. But on the upside, it's something that is suitable for all ages, and would make a

    introduction to the character for young readers.

    It opens with her origins on Themyscira, where she's back to her clay-baby start, but I don't believe this is a word-for-word recreation o

    3.5 stars

    The artwork here is just

    . Really. I think I probably enjoyed looking at the pictures far more than I did reading the story.

    Not that the story is

    . It isn't.

    Worst case scenario, the story is a bit draggy. But on the upside, it's something that is suitable for all ages, and would make a

    introduction to the character for young readers.

    It opens with her origins on Themyscira, where she's back to her clay-baby start, but I don't believe this is a word-for-word recreation of the original Wonder Woman story. I've never read the older stuff, but I think this one tells a

    of the origin story and not a faithful adaptation.

    Ok, her relationship with her mother, her rebellious need to prove herself as a warrior, and her meet-cute with Steve Trevor take up almost half the book.

    I gotta say it:

    .

    Once she gets off the island things pick up substantially, but wasn't till the end that the plot got (for me) truly interesting. As far as the characters?

    Diana seemed too aloof for me to become really attached, Ettta was too silly, and Steve seemed like a non-person.

    I did appreciate that she wasn't portrayed as overly sexy

    as a man-hater. She was strong, competent, and physically weaker than she is in today's comics. That last part changes by the ending, but it was cool seeing how her 'odd outfit' gave her the powers she originally possessed.

    To me, the best part was the lovely art, and not the actual plot. However, it was still very readable, and probably something that hardcore fans would love to own.

  • Erica
    Feb 14, 2017

    This made me feel so young and fresh, like I'd just stepped from bathing in the blood of virgins, or something. Maybe. I don't actually bathe in the blood of anybody and I'm not sure that anyone would feel any younger after bathing in the blood of people who were not sexually active, but I think you know what I mean.

    Maybe you don't.

    Let me put this another way, let me say what I probably should have said to begin with: This gave me the sentimentality. It reminded me of my long-ago youth. It made

    This made me feel so young and fresh, like I'd just stepped from bathing in the blood of virgins, or something. Maybe. I don't actually bathe in the blood of anybody and I'm not sure that anyone would feel any younger after bathing in the blood of people who were not sexually active, but I think you know what I mean.

    Maybe you don't.

    Let me put this another way, let me say what I probably should have said to begin with: This gave me the sentimentality. It reminded me of my long-ago youth. It made me like Wonder Woman again.

    I was introduced to Wonder Woman by way of Batman.

    When my aunt and uncle used to make the two-hour trek down the interstate to visit family, they'd buy their son, my older cousin (by, like, three months), Batman comics to keep him entertained on the drive. I knew who Batman and Wonder Woman and others were, thanks to

    but I was more interested in The Flash during that time. However, when my cousin came to town with a Batman doll AND a stack of comics, I wanted all of it. I decided I loved Batman best. My cousin wasn't exactly good at sharing and there were altercations so the next time they came for a stay, I received Wonder Woman comics. In retrospect, my grandmother probably got them for me because neither my aunt nor my uncle were the type to buy comics for girls nor for children not of their own making and my mom never would have done that so it was probably ZZ, who loved justice and fairness and her little granddaughter.

    For the next few years, whenever the cousins came to town, I found myself bestowed with comics, always Wonder Woman, and that is how my love of the iconic female superhero began. Of course, my love blew up and became part of my very being once Lynda Carter entered the scene. I became a fan. I had a Wonder Woman coloring book that had four stories, one in which she visits the Mole People, whom I hated coloring because they all wore brown and were brown and it was dark where they lived so I went through all my brown and black crayons because of those damned mole people. I had Wonder Woman Colorforms. I really really really wanted Wonder Woman Underroos, especially after the aforementioned cousin got Batman ones. One year for Christmas, Santa brought me the most glorious, beloved, amazing Wonder Woman doll which came to a

    The point is, from about 1976 to maybe 1982, I was all about Wonder Woman.

    And then I moved on to other things. Later, I returned to the world of comics, thanks to

    , and checked back in on my childhood love, see what she was up to. It wasn't anything interesting because nobody cared about Wonder Woman in the '90's. Her outfits had changed, her attitude had changed, her hair hadn't really changed much, but public interest in her just didn't evolve with her. X-Men, or, perhaps more to the point, X-Women had her beat in the fascinating female hero department, hands down. I retained my childhood love for Wonder Woman but didn't really keep up. It's like we were Facebook friends and I liked pictures of her travels but I didn't really know much about her anymore.

    Now we've got this little thing as our Wonder Woman.

    See how serious and dark she is?

    Yeah, I'm not impressed. I don't like any of her Facebook posts. In fact, I deny her Wonder Womanness.

    Up until this book, this was the only real Wonder Woman, both story and image, for me:

    But now we've got Renae De Liz and her husband, Ray Dillon, teaming up to dial the story back to the beginning and start fresh.

    There's some of the original content in here but there's new content, as well, like Diana's relationships with spunky BFF and an entire group of female friends. Steve Trevor (it wasn't until the first Chris Evans "Captain America" movie came out that I could differentiate between Steve Trevor and Steve Rogers. Why are there so many sandy-haired Steves in WWII-era comic stories?) is here but he's not the focal point, not the sole reason Diana becomes the world's Champion. I know, right? It's so weird that a woman would pursue a path NOT because of a man but because she did some exploration of her psyche and found a calling.

    I loved the inclusion of Greek mythology, something that's always been there but has been sort of forgotten over time, in Diana's story. Her relationship with her mother, Hippolyta, has always played a big part of Wonder Woman's tale and I felt that was set up nicely here.

    Diana is usually portrayed as a little more light-hearted and less socially reticent but it seems this story is building to a better rounded personality for my once-again favorite heroine.

    Oh, and the art. The art! It's lovely and I loved it.

    Unfortunately, there are some drawbacks. The writing isn't great. It's not bad, but there's a lot of unnecessary exposition, usually from the mouth of Etta Candy. Background characters aren't well-developed. Steve Trevor is a flat dude who exists to push the story along. Alcippe and Hippolyta are given more personality but they still couldn't stand on their own, at this point. The only other character who is fully-rounded (not a play on words) is Etta Candy and she's annoying and stereotypical, at best. The rest of the female friends are pretty much interchangeable, at this point, despite their racial diversity.

    Oh! But speaking of racial diversity, one of the things I loved in this retelling is that there are finally black women on Themyscira! Finally! It has bothered me for DECADES the amount of whiteness on Amazon Island. I mean, sure, there were women of color in the background, but never forefront. And why so many blondes? After visiting Greece, myself, I was even more puzzled at the ridiculous amount of pale skin on those Amazons. Greek women are not that light. No one in that area is that light. Hell, after almost three weeks in the country, I came back with a dark tan. But this book addresses all that. Diana is not a pale peachy color, she's the same color comic artists use to portray Native Americans, anyone from Middle East Asia, and people from India. I guess there's only one pigment to show olive and varying shades of brown skin. Whatever. The point is, she's not peachypink white. She doesn't even have American features, she's got the classic Greek profile and everything. It's refreshing. Also, maybe the door is now open to kick out that puny little blank-face actress currently portraying an Amazon warrior and put into place someone who would be the best Wonder Woman since Lynda Carter:

    Aisha Tyler.

    No, seriously, Aisha Tyler would be a perfect Wonder Woman! She's tall, she can be built if she wants, she's got a great, strong voice, she's a geek and a nerd, she's got the seriousness + humor thing down...she'd be amazing! I mean, look, she's already used to playing a kickass cartoon character:

    How is she already not perfect for this role?

    Oh, I'm sorry, what? Are you going to say that Wonder Woman isn't a black woman, that maybe it's ok for other Amazons to be black, but not this one? It's not historically accurate?

    Hmmm. I see.

    So, anyway, I really like this reboot of Wonder Woman and I hope it grows and becomes something I'd want to pass onto my children if I had any.

  • P.C. Cast
    Mar 12, 2017

    This was a quick, satisfying read! I loved getting to know young Diana, and following her as she became Wonder Woman. The writing is smart. The illustrations are gorgeous. I highly recommend!

  • Aj
    Mar 22, 2017

    My childhood hero...in a book, in my hands, is happiness on paper. Enjoyed the tale even with a few eye rolls. Disappointed in the portrayal of the gods but unsurprised as man always blames the gods for his own dark side.