Four Weddings and a Sixpence: An Anthology

Four Weddings and a Sixpence: An Anthology

Beloved authors Julia Quinn, Elizabeth Boyle, Laura Lee Guhrke, and Stefanie Sloane deliver the stories of four friends from Madame Rochambeaux’s Gentle School for Girls who find an old sixpence in their bedchamber and decide that it will be the lucky coin for each of their weddings… “Something Old”Julia Quinn’s prologue introduces her heroine Beatrice Heywood and the prem...

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Title:Four Weddings and a Sixpence: An Anthology
Author:Julia Quinn
Rating:
ISBN:0062428497
Edition Language:English
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:384 pages

Four Weddings and a Sixpence: An Anthology Reviews

  • Holly
    Jan 16, 2017

    *4.5 stars

    I enjoyed the overall book but some stories I liked better. So this is how I would break them down:

    Something New by Stephanie Sloane.....2 stars

    Something Borrowed by Elizabeth Boyle.....5 stars

    Something Blue by Laura Lee Guhrke......4.5 stars

    And.....A Sixpence in Her Shoe by Julia Quinn.....4 stars

  • Andrea
    Jan 27, 2017

    Buddy read with Becca and Lacey! As always, it was great fun - thanks you guys!

    I loved the premise of this book: Four girls find an old coin and decide it will be their lucky charm based on an old and familiar rhyme that all the stories were built around:

    Something old, the prologue by Julia Quinn was a nice set-up for the series. It introduced the characters and their backgrounds before the girls' individual sto

    Buddy read with Becca and Lacey! As always, it was great fun - thanks you guys!

    I loved the premise of this book: Four girls find an old coin and decide it will be their lucky charm based on an old and familiar rhyme that all the stories were built around:

    Something old, the prologue by Julia Quinn was a nice set-up for the series. It introduced the characters and their backgrounds before the girls' individual stories start.

    Something New by Stephanie Sloane:

    I really loved this story. Anne and Rhys were an adorable couple and their chemistry was off the charts. I really liked their connection and characters, but then out of nowhere, they just went at it up against a wall and it totally ruined things for me. 4 stars

    Something Borrowed by Elizabeth Boyle:

    Meh. I didn't care for this one and it left no impression on me besides the fact that here too, the characters just HAVE to have sex. It didn't work for me. 1 star

    Something Blue by Laura Lee Guhrke:

    My least favorite story of the bunch. I didn't buy the connection between the main characters and we all agreed that this story probably would've worked better as a full-length novel. 1 star

    ... And a Sixpence in her Shoe by Julia Quinn:

    Perfection! The hero and heroine were just adorable. I only wish I could've spend more time with them. 5 stars

    Overall, I didn't like this anthology as much as

    and

    , but it was still fun.

  • (Tori-Smexybooks) smexys_sidekick
    Dec 28, 2016

    Originally posted at Smexybooks-

    Four well know historical romance authors have come together in a spirited anthology about four young women who meet as girls at Madame Rochambeaux’s Gentle School for Girls and become fast friends despite their differences in social, class, and economic status. When they find a mysterious sixpence hidden in a mattress, the girls decide it will be their lucky charm towards making the perfect marriage. Now years later, these

    Originally posted at Smexybooks-

    Four well know historical romance authors have come together in a spirited anthology about four young women who meet as girls at Madame Rochambeaux’s Gentle School for Girls and become fast friends despite their differences in social, class, and economic status. When they find a mysterious sixpence hidden in a mattress, the girls decide it will be their lucky charm towards making the perfect marriage. Now years later, these young women each take a chance on the coin and their happiness.

    Something Old by Julia Quinn sets up the premise for Four Weddings and a Sixpence and introduces readers to her heroine, Beatrice Heyward.

    Stefanie Sloane’s Something New finds Anne Brabourne in a dilemma. She must marry by her 21st birthday or she will find herself packed away to the countryside permanently. Unwillingly to repeat her parent’s turbulent marriage, Anne wants to find a biddable husband who will allow her the freedom and peace she desires. A chance meeting with the delectable and marriage avoiding Duke of Dorset proves their undoing but can he convince himself and her that marriage isn’t the end but the beginning?

    Humor, mayhem, and some meddlesome relatives offers readers a unique and fun courtship between two marriage-shy individuals.

    Something Borrowed by Elizabeth Boyle introduces us to Cordelia Padley whose little white lie about having a fiance has come to haunt her and now she must find a real one toute de suite. A childhood promise has her asking an old friend for a favor. Pretend to be her fiance for a week and then they will part ways. When these two reunite they discover that more than just promises connect them but will an Earl in need of funds choose duty or heart?

    A sweet reconnection romance blooms between two friends as they attempt to deceive their loved ones. The mild angst blends well with dry humor and strong chemistry.

    Something Blue by Laura Lee Guhrke pits Lady Elinor Daventry against a former flame when he steals her sixpence. Elinor needs her lucky charm in order to marry an influential man who can save her father from the man who stole her heart. But the sixpence has other plans for Elinor as she soon discovers that in order to hate someone, you still have to be in love with them.

    More serious and emotionally based on the four, I enjoyed watching the dilemma between love and duty unfold and play out

    Julia Quinn’s… and a Sixpence in Her Shoe ends the anthology with Beatrice Heyward. Beatrice, an orphan raised by a pair of spinster aunts, doesn’t believe the sixpence is lucky at all but decides to play along to keep her friends happy. An enthusiastic student of the sciences, Beatrice finds her own happily ever after with a wounded Marquis who’s own scientific studies make them the perfect match.

    This is my favorite of the four. A chance meeting, a misunderstanding, and two enthusiastic aunts help these quiet scholars find love among the stars. A lovely and very touching story that looks beyond the physical to the heart of the matter.

    An enjoyable anthology that showcases the strong bonds of friendship and the power of belief. Though each author is different, these four voices blend together perfectly as each one captures the essence of their charge(s) and their somewhat rocky road to true love. I liked the premise behind a shared “good luck” charm that is passed around. Reminded me a little of the Sisterhood of Traveling Pants series.

    Grade: B

  • Michele
    Dec 31, 2016

    In the Regency anthology Four Weddings and a Sixpence, readers have the distinct pleasure of perusing stories written by four different but equally talented authors. Julia Quinn, Elizabeth Boyle, Stefanie Sloane and Laura Lee Guhrke did a great job putting their own spin on a tale of four best friends who discover a sixpence while at boarding school. A sixpence that the girls hope will have the magical ability to help them find true love, based on the well known rhyme that also serves as titles

    In the Regency anthology Four Weddings and a Sixpence, readers have the distinct pleasure of perusing stories written by four different but equally talented authors. Julia Quinn, Elizabeth Boyle, Stefanie Sloane and Laura Lee Guhrke did a great job putting their own spin on a tale of four best friends who discover a sixpence while at boarding school. A sixpence that the girls hope will have the magical ability to help them find true love, based on the well known rhyme that also serves as titles for each of their stories.

    __________________________

    Original Notes:

    A delightful Regency anthology where all of the stories were connected by the main group of four friends and a "lucky" sixpence. I thought the writing flowed well from story to story, with none of the author's writing styles overshadowing any of the others. Of course I would love to have had more details about each couple and their situation, but even with these being novella length, it still worked well in my humble opinion. Full review to come.

  • Becca
    Jan 27, 2017

    Warning: my review is biased because I LOVE ANTHOLOGIES. I love them. I know most readers love a full-length novel, but I must say that when there is an anthology that comes out with a clever concept and good writing...well, I just get

    I had the pleasure of reading this with Andrea and Lacey, which made the reading experience even more enjoyable so take my following review with a grain of salt.

    This anthology is four stories told in chronological order about 4 friends that find a sixpence

    Warning: my review is biased because I LOVE ANTHOLOGIES. I love them. I know most readers love a full-length novel, but I must say that when there is an anthology that comes out with a clever concept and good writing...well, I just get

    I had the pleasure of reading this with Andrea and Lacey, which made the reading experience even more enjoyable so take my following review with a grain of salt.

    This anthology is four stories told in chronological order about 4 friends that find a sixpence while they are at school and then hang onto it and share it as a good luck talisman as they each find love, even when they don't expect it.

    Julia Quinn did the Prologue and it was perfectly done. I knew the characters, I knew the concept, and I was hooked. This really sucked me in and made each of the stories that much better because the foundation was a good one.

    Interestingly, this was a new author for me. Stephanie Sloane had a pretty fast-paced, friends-to-lovers tale and I really enjoyed it. It was mellow and uncomplicated and the characters were likeable. It was just fun. The only downfall of this novel came from the off-the-wall (literally) sex scene that was thrown in at the end. I'd rather of had more pages of them talking than that completely unrealistic scene. Aside from that, a really fun read and an author I will now try again. 4.5 stars.

    I don't often like Elizabeth Boyle's full-length novels, but I have enjoyed her novellas when I read them. This one was no different. While I believe the heroine, who was a scatter-brained, unrealistic dreamer, would have annoyed me in a full-length book, I didn't mind her much here. The true draw of this story was the hero. YUM. I really liked him a lot. Kipp was stodgy, stoic, overly proper...and wildly sensual underneath it all. The plot of this story didn't really make sense, but I didn't care because I loved the hero and flew through pages as I waited for all the starch to wear off so he would finally snap. I wasn't disappointed. While Lacey and Andrea didn't like the sex scene...I did. I thought it was crazy and stupid for them to do, but I felt like it worked because the hero had finally reached his limit. I don't know how to explain it, but this worked. The heroine was silly and unremarkable, but the hero, Kipp, made it all worth it :)

    4 stars.

    This story by Laura Lee Guhrke was my least favorite of the group. It is a second chance at love story with a bit of intrigue thrown in that all just fell flat for me because I didn't believe the couple really loved each other. The entire premise of this story is about the couple who were wildly in love and prepared to marry until the hero decides to take on a case to thoroughly ruin the heroine's father (and thus her entire family). While Guhrke clearly outlined and explained the situation and I understood it, it only made me question how two people could ever have a marriage where the husband is overzealous in his need to bring the wife's father to the House of Lords to be tried and most likely, hanged. He never tried to see the situation from her point of view, and even in the final chapter, he criticized her for not wholly betraying her father and said he was only marrying her now because he'd compromised her (how romantic...ick). They just didn't work for me. Now, I have heard from Caz, who listened to it on audio that this was her favorite so maybe the audio makes this work. Food for thought :) My rating: 1.5 stars

    Julia Quinn rounds out the quartet and much to my disappointment, hers was also the shortest. The romance moves at breakneck speed and seems a bit implausible, but her writing is so charming and light that I didn't care. I liked the two characters and was happy when they found each other. I definitely could have read about them in a full-length novel. My one concern was that JQ's writing seemed a bit different to me. She was still great, as usual, but I felt that the writing was a bit scatterbrained. Not so much that it detracted from the story but enough that if she ventures too much more in that direction, I won't like the style anymore because it will be choppy in its effort to be "cute" if that makes sense (this also happened to me with Eloisa James and with early Megan Frampton books). Anyway, this was still super enjoyable and had me going "awww" at the end. It was a nice way to end the quartet. 5 stars.

  • Chitra *CJ*
    Dec 29, 2016

    Ellie, Bea, and Cordelia and Anne meet at Madame Rochambeaux’s finishing school in their early youth.

    Each from different family, different class and different circumstances.

    When they find a sixpence stuck at the bottom of their bed, they decide to try out the superstition that it helps you find your perfect husband.

    Each of their stories is by the authors in the anthology.

    After a prologue by Julia Quinn, we start the book.

    Ellie, Bea, and Cordelia and Anne meet at Madame Rochambeaux’s finishing school in their early youth.

    Each from different family, different class and different circumstances.

    When they find a sixpence stuck at the bottom of their bed, they decide to try out the superstition that it helps you find your perfect husband.

    Each of their stories is by the authors in the anthology.

    After a prologue by Julia Quinn, we start the book.

    Anne is 21 and needs to marry to please her uncle. After many unsuccessful seasons in the ballroom,on one night, she escapes to a library and meets Rhys, the marriage avoiding Duke of Dorset.

    I really really loved the sweet courtship between the coupl- and adored the meddling relatives. Had humor and charm and I'd love to read more by the author.

    While Cordelia is travelling the world, she is being pressured to get engaged. To get her relatives off her back, she lies that she is..to her childhood friend Kipp; who is now the Earl of Thornton.

    Such a sweet story of old friends falling back in love and rediscovering their dreams. So much yearning, some mild angst.

    I had adored it until the point Kipp left to apologize. Pfft. Good story overall.

    Bittersweet love story of ex-bethroted couple who have a fallout when Lawrence discovers evidence what incriminates Ellie's dad and their lifelong courtship ends. When Ellie sets her sight on someone else, Lawrence decides to intervene.

    Loved the dilemma between love vs duty/responsibilities. The book had mild angst and a good ending.

    Beautifully tender love story between a Marquess, who's partial blindness plunges his perspectives into darkness until the astronomy enthusiast Bea pulls him out. Really lovely moments between the two.

    Overall, I dont know which book was my most favorite..but I thoroughly enjoyed this anthology. Four friends, four weddings, and a lucky sixpence.

    Safe read

    4.75/5

  • SmartBitches
    Dec 29, 2016

    is super comforting. It’s a collection of four novellas, all Regency romances, all remarkably angst-free. Five minutes after reading each story I had already forgotten all about it, but I remembered my enjoyment while reading it.

    The novellas are held together by a framing story written by Julia Quinn. In 1817, four girls who are attending Madame Rochambeaux’s Gentle School for Girls find a sixpence in the mattress. The girls

    is super comforting. It’s a collection of four novellas, all Regency romances, all remarkably angst-free. Five minutes after reading each story I had already forgotten all about it, but I remembered my enjoyment while reading it.

    The novellas are held together by a framing story written by Julia Quinn. In 1817, four girls who are attending Madame Rochambeaux’s Gentle School for Girls find a sixpence in the mattress. The girls (Bea, Cordelia, Ellie, and Anne) decide to keep it for good luck when they recall the rhyme “Something borrowed, something blue, something old, and something new, and a sixpence in her shoe.” This sixpence, they decide, will bring each of them a husband. Since Anne has to marry before she turns twenty-one, she gets to use it first, with the stipulation that if she does get married, she will pass the sixpence to Cordelia who will pass it on to Ellie who will pass it on to the intensely skeptical Bea.

    All in all, I give this collection a B- with the caveat that your enjoyment of it will depend on your mood and your catnip. Because the stories are all short, they don’t get much time for things to develop. The plots are all somewhat implausible and the stories lack the kind of emotional weight that make then stick in the mind.

    However, the stories are also sweet, funny, and heartfelt. Their very shortness and lightness make them perfect for a stressful time (like, oh say, the end of December, when I personally tend to lose my mind in a pile of discarded wrapping paper). Also, the friendship between the women is delightful. I would happily have read a book about the girls going to boarding school, without the adult romances.

    - Carrie S.

  • Tishke
    Dec 31, 2016

    2 stars for the first three stories.

    4 star for the last one by Julia Quinn.

  • Caz
    Jan 07, 2017

    I’m not a big fan of anthologies or novellas in general, because I find there are few authors who really understand how to use the shorter form to greatest effect, and I most often come away from them feeling a bit disappointed. And anthologies tend to be uneven; there will usually be one really good story and the others will be of lesser, variable quality. So why

    I’m not a big fan of anthologies or novellas in general, because I find there are few authors who really understand how to use the shorter form to greatest effect, and I most often come away from them feeling a bit disappointed. And anthologies tend to be uneven; there will usually be one really good story and the others will be of lesser, variable quality. So why did I listen to this one? A look at the narrator’s name will answer that question. Mary Jane Wells can make even average material enjoyable to listen to, and while two of the stories here do fall into the average category, the other two – from Julia Quinn and Laura Lee Guhrke – definitely transcend that qualification. Each story in

    features one of a group of four friends who, while at school, find an old sixpence in a mattress and, based on the words of the old rhyme:

    – decide to keep the sixpence on the chance that it may lead them to true love.

    You can read the rest of this review at

    .

  • Paige  Bookdragon
    Jan 06, 2017

    Full review to come.