The Book of Mirrors

The Book of Mirrors

ONE MAN'S TRUTH IS ANOTHER MAN'S LIE.When big-shot literary agent Peter Katz receives an unfinished manuscript entitled The Book of Mirrors, he is intrigued.The author, Richard Flynn is writing a memoir about his time at Princeton in the late 80s, documenting his relationship with the famous Professor Joseph Wieder.One night in 1987, Wieder was brutally murdered in his hom...

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Title:The Book of Mirrors
Author:E.O. Chirovici
Rating:
ISBN:1780895674
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:336 pages

The Book of Mirrors Reviews

  • Louise Wilson
    Dec 27, 2016

    3.5 stars. Peter Katz is a literary agent. He receives an unfinished manuscript entitled The Book Of Mirrors written by Richard Flynn. Flynn is writing a memoir about his time at Princeton around the late 1980's, his relationships with the famous Professor Joseph Wieder. In 1987 Wieder was brutally murdered at home and the case was never solved. Peter Katz is determined to get to the bottom of what happened and is convinced the full manuscript will reveal the identity of who committed this viole

    3.5 stars. Peter Katz is a literary agent. He receives an unfinished manuscript entitled The Book Of Mirrors written by Richard Flynn. Flynn is writing a memoir about his time at Princeton around the late 1980's, his relationships with the famous Professor Joseph Wieder. In 1987 Wieder was brutally murdered at home and the case was never solved. Peter Katz is determined to get to the bottom of what happened and is convinced the full manuscript will reveal the identity of who committed this violent crime. But will stirring up people's memories become dangerous?

    A decently written thriller but it does tend to run flat at times. Lots of twists to the storyline. Enjoyable tho.

    I would like to thank NetGalley, RandomHouse UK - Cornerstone and the author E. O. Chirovici for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  • Liz Barnsley
    Oct 01, 2016

    The Book of Mirrors is a very clever novel. I do like one of those. It is also UTTERLY addictive – picked this up earlier today meaning to make a start on it and now here we are and I’m done. On the surface it is an old school murder mystery but like an onion every layer you peel away reveals another layer, perception is in the eye of the beholder and it is an immersive experience in that your own perceptions and realities will definitely inform what you read.

    We start with a manuscript section s

    The Book of Mirrors is a very clever novel. I do like one of those. It is also UTTERLY addictive – picked this up earlier today meaning to make a start on it and now here we are and I’m done. On the surface it is an old school murder mystery but like an onion every layer you peel away reveals another layer, perception is in the eye of the beholder and it is an immersive experience in that your own perceptions and realities will definitely inform what you read.

    We start with a manuscript section sent to an agent. But is the story in it true? And what on earth actually did happen all those years ago considering the story is only half told? What follows is a multi viewpoint unravelling of an old crime, character driven in more ways than one, endlessly compelling and with a narrative you will start questioning all the way.

    I particularly liked how the author plays with the theme of memory, of how our life experiences skew our viewpoint, that thing that makes eye witness accounts of the same incident so very varied. Whilst there is a police presence in The Book of Mirrors that is absolutely not its focus – I wouldnt like to call it a psychological thriller either, it is more about letting the characters speak and therefore reveal not only themselves but perhaps the truth behind a murder.

    Really beautifully constructed to encompass nuance of plot and depth of character, The Book of Mirrors is one of those novels you know you are going to continue to think back on, to wonder about. It is a simple story in many ways, a story oft told within the human experience – what Mr Chirovici does though is highly effective, fascinating and potent storytelling. Hence I just lost my Saturday afternoon to it. Worth every minute.

    Highly Recommended.

  • Susan
    Oct 17, 2016

    Even before I started this novel, I was aware of the publicity around it. Romanian author, Eugene Chirovici, who has previously written ten literary mysteries in his native country, before re-locating to the UK and trying his luck with the larger market here. It seems to have been a good move. In Romania, Chirovici had to work as a journalist; not making enough from his writing to live on. This first novel in English has resulted in a huge success – with 23 countries snapping this up and the aut

    Even before I started this novel, I was aware of the publicity around it. Romanian author, Eugene Chirovici, who has previously written ten literary mysteries in his native country, before re-locating to the UK and trying his luck with the larger market here. It seems to have been a good move. In Romania, Chirovici had to work as a journalist; not making enough from his writing to live on. This first novel in English has resulted in a huge success – with 23 countries snapping this up and the author looking at a huge success. When you hear of novels making that kind of excitement before they have even been released, you wonder whether the book will be exciting as it promises to be.

    I have to admit that I have a fondness of books set around academia and so the premise of this novel appealed to me. Having read it, I thought it was both simpler than I thought it would be – more straightforward – and yet is obviously is not a debut novel and the author has written a clever, literary mystery. This begins with a really strong opening, with a literary agent receiving a letter from Richard Flynn, who majored in English at Princeton in 1987. He sends a sample of a manuscript about events during his last year there and, despite the huge number of submissions he receives, the agent is intrigued by the submission letter.

    During his time at Princeton, Richard Flynn fell in love with the beautiful Laura Baines. Through her, he was introduced to Professor Joseph Wieder and begins to work for him, organising his library. Flynn is an aspiring writer, but when the Professor is found murdered, he becomes a suspect. Enthralled by this sample, agent Peter Katz, is keen to read the rest of the work – however, it transpires that the rest of the manuscript cannot be found.

    This is really a book in three parts, with the agent reading the unfinished manuscript and an investigation by both journalist, John Keller, and a detective who worked on the case, Roy Freeman, to either discover the missing book or find out what really happened. The author is keen to tell us that the book is about memory and how we interpret, or mis-interpret, our memories over time. Really, though, this is an interesting mystery, with a good cast of characters, various possible motives and an enjoyable investigation into events. This is enjoyable and clever – not quite as great as I had hoped, but I would certainly read more by this author.

  • Sam
    Dec 07, 2016

    grew on me as I read it. At face value, it's a cold case whodunit concerning the murder of a prominent psychologist and Princeton educator, but it's also a meditation on how we as humans remember things, forget things, and invent things in our memories and our pasts, consciously and unconsciously. It also has a nice undercurrent of how relationships and moments are reflected in the eyes of different people, and how each person sees the past, present and future through their own i

    grew on me as I read it. At face value, it's a cold case whodunit concerning the murder of a prominent psychologist and Princeton educator, but it's also a meditation on how we as humans remember things, forget things, and invent things in our memories and our pasts, consciously and unconsciously. It also has a nice undercurrent of how relationships and moments are reflected in the eyes of different people, and how each person sees the past, present and future through their own individual prism of thought and need and desire.

    The novel is told in three parts: first from the perspective of literary agent Peter Katz, who receives a mysterious partial manuscript from a Richard Flynn that is purportedly nonfiction concerning the 1987 murder of Professor Jospeh Wieder; then from John Keller, a former journalist that Katz hires to research the background of Flynn's manuscript and locate the missing second half; and finally from Roy Freeman, the ex-cop who worked the Wieder case and was Keller interviewed, prompting him to re-canvas and put the puzzle pieces together. You're never in Katz's perspective for long: he sets things in motion by receiving the manuscript, but it's mostly from the manuscript and Richard Flynn's first person account that we get the initial perspective and set up.

    Because it's our first perspective, I started by following the trail Richard was laying out in terms of the "facts" of the situation. As John and then Roy start to pull on various threads and webs, what were secondary characters become spotlight suspects and witnesses, and everyone's relationship with and viewpoint of everyone else is both clarified and called into question. And the blurred lines between truth and fiction, fact and invention are thrust into the forefront. The touch on Roy's Alzheimer's serves to further underline the fleeting and limited grasp of the human brain to remember.

    The writing is just ok to fine: I found Chirovici to do a better job showcasing the myriad reflections of the characters in the whodunit drama of 1987 and present (Laura, Richard, Wieder) than being able to provide truly different voices for our ostensible narrators Peter, John, and Roy. There weren't enough stylistic and tonal difference, for example, between John, a thirty something well educated journalist working for a check , and Roy, an aged black ex-cop pursuing his cold case out of the pursuit of justice and righting mistakes before his mind permanently betrays him.

    Overall, this is a fairly entertaining, easy read thriller-type that does present some interesting (though not new) ideas about how humans view, catalogue, and remember events and people. But it's nothing transcendent of the genre. Fun and mostly forgettable, but I did like it. Solid three stars for me.

  • Adina
    Nov 28, 2016

    The Book of Mirrors is an intelligent, well-paced, decently written thriller set in the academia world. It was a fun, light read but it wasn’t extraordinary. The written is simple, engaging and I can see a movie being made after the book.

    I decided to read this novel when I saw the name of the author, Chirovici. It seemed Romanian (it is) and I was intrigued as I haven’t heard of him before. The research for more information took me to a Guardian article where I learned more about the author and

    The Book of Mirrors is an intelligent, well-paced, decently written thriller set in the academia world. It was a fun, light read but it wasn’t extraordinary. The written is simple, engaging and I can see a movie being made after the book.

    I decided to read this novel when I saw the name of the author, Chirovici. It seemed Romanian (it is) and I was intrigued as I haven’t heard of him before. The research for more information took me to a Guardian article where I learned more about the author and the novel. E.O. Chirovici worked in Romania as a journalist and wrote mystery novels in his spare time as the market is too small here to be able to win enough money from writing. He decided to move to UK in order to become a full time writer and after a short while he wrote Book of Mirrors, his first novel written in English. After failed attempts to find a publisher in the US he got lucky and managed to find an enthusiastic agent in UK. After that, the reception of his work gained momentum fast and the book was sold to publishers in 23 countries even before the release date (January 2017). Impressive and overwhelming, I would say. Will this be the „literary mystery ” of 2017? We shall see.

    The novel’s onset is ideal for a book lover. A literary agent receives a sample of a manuscript and it becomes apparent that the subject is a true crime that happened twenty-five years before in which the author was involved. A famous psychology professor was killed at that time and the manuscript can prove to be the key to finding the killer. There is a only small problem. The author dies and the manuscript is nowhere to be found.

    The book is structured in three parts and is narrated by three people: the agent, a journalist hired to investigate the disappearance and verity of the manuscript and a retired police officer that was assigned to the case 25 years ago. I thought the structure to be interesting and well done although the voices seemed somewhat similar.

    The main theme that emerges from the novel’s pages is the unreliability of memory. The novel made me think of another book about memory,

    by Julian Barnes which probably inspired Chirovici as one of the three parts starts with a quote from the Booker winning novel. From the beginning (even from the title) we are drawn to believe that the solution to the mystery has something to do with memory and human psychology but is it there where we have to look? Or is this another mirror? To find the answer to that question you need to read the book.

    I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    The Guardian article I was talking about can be found here:

  • Karen
    Feb 18, 2017

    I really enjoyed this thriller.

    Peter Katzis a literary agent who receives an unusual query and partial manuscript from fledgling writer Richard Flynn. Richard’s powerful life-changing and tragic story leaves Peter wanting to know more so he sets out to find the rest of the manuscript.

    In the shared pieces of Richard’s manuscript we meet wickedly smart Laura Baines, a fellow Princeton psychology student studying to get her second Master’s; famous Professor Joseph Wieder, who runs a research progra

    I really enjoyed this thriller.

    Peter Katzis a literary agent who receives an unusual query and partial manuscript from fledgling writer Richard Flynn. Richard’s powerful life-changing and tragic story leaves Peter wanting to know more so he sets out to find the rest of the manuscript.

    In the shared pieces of Richard’s manuscript we meet wickedly smart Laura Baines, a fellow Princeton psychology student studying to get her second Master’s; famous Professor Joseph Wieder, who runs a research program at Princeton that is expected to be a huge scientific breakthrough. He is also supervising Laura on her graduate thesis. Laura is Wieder’s protégé but is she also something more? Richard is falling in love with her and becoming suspicious. One day Joseph Wieder is murdered and Richard becomes a suspect.

    The story is now in place and the search is on to find the rest of the manuscript and to find resolution in the 25-year old unsolved case. It is set up in three parts from three different perspectives; that of Peter Katz; another from John Keller, a journalist/blogger and friend of Peter ‘s who’s curiosity is piqued after John tells him about Richard Flynn’s manuscript; and lastly Roy Freeman, a retired detective involved in the 25-year old unsolved case and still obsessed by it.

    Well, I became obsessed with this book, loved the multi-perspectives, the twists and the mystery surrounding the manuscript. The back-stories of characters were just right and didn’t get bogged down. It was a suspenseful crime story that hooked me early on and kept me guessing until the end.

    Thanks to Atria and Netgalley for providing an ARC.

  • Alex ☣ Deranged KittyCat ☣
    Jan 12, 2017

    You know those movies with a lot of exposition and little action? Reading The Book of Mirrors felt like watching such a movie. Add a noir feel to it, and you lost my interest (therefore it took me over a week to finish it).

    You know those movies with a lot of exposition and little action? Reading The Book of Mirrors felt like watching such a movie. Add a noir feel to it, and you lost my interest (therefore it took me over a week to finish it).

    I was extremely excited about reading a book by a Romanian author

    . I even heard talk about a movie based on it, so I was sure it had to be great. Unfortunately, it's completely not my style.

    I need to connect with at least one character in the book to like it. I thought that character would be Richard Flynn, even if his

    felt lifeless. I came to despise Laura Baines. And then I felt cheated because it turned out that Flynn wasn't completely honest in his manuscript. So I stopped liking/rooting for him.

    Enter the journalist who felt indifferent in the end. Except for a phone call he had with Laura, he showed little emotion. Not even his f**k-buddy dumping him made him take action. So he made me feel nothing.

    Then came the ex-cop who needed to solve the mystery of the murder as his last

    . Now that I think about it, all the narrators felt like they had the same voice. They could have been the same person and it would have made little difference. And they were all talk, and no action. It was all very anticlimatic when the murderer was finally confronted. It felt like a bunch of old people fooling around.

    Also, I disliked the ending. I need closure when reading a book. I need to know that everybody got what they deserved to some extent. It's hard to explain without giving away huge spoilers, so I'll just leave it at that.

    Needless to say, I didn't like The Book of Mirrors. The second star is because it was written by a Romanian author, and I wish him all the best in the world. I hope he becomes known worldwide.

  • Dannii Elle
    Nov 29, 2016

    I received this in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley. Thank you to the author, E.O. Chirovici, and the publisher, Century, for this opportunity.

    One of the most suspenseful and unguessable crime stories I have ever read! This chronicles the years following the death of Professor Joseph Wieder after a partial manuscript appears, where author, Richard Flynn, claims to have details concerning his mysterious death.

    Split into three sections and using three different protagonists, this could

    I received this in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley. Thank you to the author, E.O. Chirovici, and the publisher, Century, for this opportunity.

    One of the most suspenseful and unguessable crime stories I have ever read! This chronicles the years following the death of Professor Joseph Wieder after a partial manuscript appears, where author, Richard Flynn, claims to have details concerning his mysterious death.

    Split into three sections and using three different protagonists, this could often become quite a confusing and muddling read, but wading through the murk to get to the truth proved rewarding.

    I felt constantly a pace behind the narrative of this and continually had a myriad of conflicting theories concerning who the perpetrator of the crime was and what their intentions were. It wasn't until the final grand reveal that all became clear and, as the author so rightly says, this is more of a "whydunnit than a whodunnit".

    Fast-paced with a cast of untrustworthy characters, this is compelling suspense fiction at its finest!

  • Abby (Crime by the Book)
    Dec 01, 2016

    I'd rate this book between 3.5 - 4 stars! This is a totally compelling novel - my only qualm with it is that it's not *really* a thriller. Or at least, it's not the kind of thriller I was anticipating.

    THE BOOK OF MIRRORS does many things very well—my personal favorite element of this book is how it gives the reader 3 unique perspectives on one cold case. This is a super unique and engaging way of unraveling a mystery from the past! I did love that element of this book. However, I hoped for more

    I'd rate this book between 3.5 - 4 stars! This is a totally compelling novel - my only qualm with it is that it's not *really* a thriller. Or at least, it's not the kind of thriller I was anticipating.

    THE BOOK OF MIRRORS does many things very well—my personal favorite element of this book is how it gives the reader 3 unique perspectives on one cold case. This is a super unique and engaging way of unraveling a mystery from the past! I did love that element of this book. However, I hoped for more intrigue and suspense from this story. I somehow never felt invested enough in the story's cold case to be truly shocked by any twists of the plot.

    My main point with this book: you need to know what you're getting before you begin reading, or you might end up disappointed. This book definitely has mystery elements, and it definitely has a crime at its core, but it's really a cross between literary thriller and character study - it's not a psychological thriller. If you're in the mood for a literary thriller or a slow-burning story that examines a cold case from all different angles, this is a perfect choice! If, however, you're looking for more active thriller elements, look elsewhere.

  • Sean Peters
    Dec 27, 2016

    Thank you to Net Galley, the publishers and author for an ARC copy.

    Firstly, all I can say some books work for me some do not.

    I noted that many readers have given this book 4 and 5 stars, I feel I am being very generous giving this two stars, purely for the difference in the plot.

    I tried very best to keep going, knowing as many had mentioned it would get better, to me it did not.

    I found the book so hard to try to get into, a book has to grip me somehow in someway, this failed.

    This does seem to be

    Thank you to Net Galley, the publishers and author for an ARC copy.

    Firstly, all I can say some books work for me some do not.

    I noted that many readers have given this book 4 and 5 stars, I feel I am being very generous giving this two stars, purely for the difference in the plot.

    I tried very best to keep going, knowing as many had mentioned it would get better, to me it did not.

    I found the book so hard to try to get into, a book has to grip me somehow in someway, this failed.

    This does seem to be a book that you love or you hate?

    No tension, no shock, no... well nothing.

    Sorry, but just not for me, but as you know from reviews many have loved this book

    Two stars from me.