The Silver Gate

The Silver Gate

In shepherd boy Elric’s tiny village, people think children like his younger sister, Wynn, are changelings-left by fairies and doomed to curse all around them. As a baby, Wynn was born with developmental delays, and according to the rules, she was supposed to be abandoned in the woods.Instead Elric’s mother saved his sister and hid her away for eleven years. They live in s...

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Title:The Silver Gate
Author:Kristin Bailey
Rating:
ISBN:0062398598
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:320 pages

The Silver Gate Reviews

  • Teresa
    Jul 28, 2016

    * e-Arc provided by Netgalley *

  • kerrycat
    Sep 30, 2016

    SLJ review:

  • Billie
    Nov 15, 2016

    Elric was not a very likable character. He treated his sister, Wynn, with impatience and a lack of understanding. (The author's note at the beginning of the book explains that Wynn has developmental challenges due to Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome.) And, although Ms. Bailey tries very hard not to make it so, Wynn comes across as a "magical idiot". The ending could have been amazing had Bailey left it ambiguous, but, instead, she gave it a Happily Ever After and a forced set-up for a sequel.

  • Sasha
    Dec 28, 2016

    It's a quest story, in which the two travel party members have completely different goals. After their mother's death, Elric wants to protect his sister Wynn, often called a half-wit or a changeling, from their father who wants to sell her to his lord as a slave. Author's note at the beginning says she has Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome. She has trouble remembering things and her shortened limbs and wide fingers make daily life challenging. A convent Elric's heard about nearby may be the best place f

    It's a quest story, in which the two travel party members have completely different goals. After their mother's death, Elric wants to protect his sister Wynn, often called a half-wit or a changeling, from their father who wants to sell her to his lord as a slave. Author's note at the beginning says she has Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome. She has trouble remembering things and her shortened limbs and wide fingers make daily life challenging. A convent Elric's heard about nearby may be the best place for Wynn. Wynn, on the other hand, thinks they've embarked on an adventure, and she is trying to find the kind fairy queen from the songs her mother used to sing for her. Oh, and they are accompanied by Mildred, the fat black hen. Obviously my favorite character.

    The two come across terrible danger and obstacles, about half of them caused by hurting and mistreating each other. Elric often loses patience and hope, Wynn is stubborn and has her head in the clouds. Those parts were difficult to read, but it's critical to show how challenging disability can be for everyone involved. Not everyone is a saint, but overcoming yourself to become a good companion and friend is more important than whatever virtues you were born with, in my mind. The ugliness was very much needed.

    I liked the book, the characters, the middle and the end (the beginning was so depressing that I wanted to stop reading), plus Mildred, my hen-bae. I say this one is worth picking up.

  • Jeanette
    Feb 14, 2017

    Had a hard time caring about these characters

  • Mariana
    Jan 23, 2017

    3.5 Review soon.

  • Lucía Cafeína
    Jan 23, 2017

    2,5 en realidad.

    Es una historia tierna y el personaje de Wynn me ha parecido una preciosidad, pero creo que se le podría haber sacado mucho más a esta historia... Y también esperaba más del final, me da la sensación de que era completamente innecesario que quedase abierto hacia una continuación.

  • Laura
    Feb 20, 2017

    When Elric discovers his father sold his sister Wynn to the Lord's castle as a lowly maid after their mother's death, Elric convinces Wynn to run away with him under the pretense of a game: to search for the Silver Fate, a place made up in the fairytales their mother told them. But as they continue their journey across the land in hopes of finding refuge in a convent or village, the siblings begin to realize just how difficult life can be on their own. But Wynn believes in the Silver Gate, she b

    When Elric discovers his father sold his sister Wynn to the Lord's castle as a lowly maid after their mother's death, Elric convinces Wynn to run away with him under the pretense of a game: to search for the Silver Fate, a place made up in the fairytales their mother told them. But as they continue their journey across the land in hopes of finding refuge in a convent or village, the siblings begin to realize just how difficult life can be on their own. But Wynn believes in the Silver Gate, she believes in the magic, and it's up to Elric to open his eyes and see it too.

    I was only 60 pages into this when the siblings' relationship made me cry. It's so beautiful, heartfelt, and strong. Elric is of course frustrated with his younger sister just like any older sibling would be -- but he has such a deep love for her that it just ripped me apart. Add on another important layer to this story: Wynn has Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. One in every 125,000 births have this. These individuals have learning disabilities and physical defects that mark them as "other." Toss in this novel's setting -- Celtic in origin, Middle Ages -- and society rejects these individuals as halfwits or changelings. So to see this sibling relationship, and feel it every step and struggle throughout their journey...oh gosh. Tears. Everywhere.

    Wynn is the true hero of this story. She urges her brother and the reader to believe -- mind, body, and soul -- in the power of the imagination, in magic, in make-believe. She may not be able to build a fire, she doesn't pack the right things, it's hard for her to remember things if she doesn't ruminate on them over and over, and she may not speak very well, but her mind and creativity is her saving refuge. Her insistence that the Silver Gate is more than the stuff of bedtime stories and folk songs shows just how powerful magic can be. What a beautiful, smart girl.

    And what a beautiful, smart, rich, heart-wrenching story of love, sacrifice, and imagination!

  • Marg Corjay
    Feb 07, 2017

    It did get dark and frightening in places, but handled the topic of being different well. Emphasized that everyone has their own special talents that we can contribute. Loved the ending!

  • Shauna Coy
    Feb 07, 2017

    In this story, Elric and his sister Wynn flee from their father, who wants to sell his "changeling" daughter into slavery. I'm not sure what to think about Elric -- on one hand, he would do anything to protect his sister, but on the other hand impatience, frustration, and worry often get the best of him, and he acts like a big jerk. I suppose that's not uncommon behavior among siblings.

    Wynn is an interesting character too. She has developmental delays, and Elric sometimes sees her as a burden,

    In this story, Elric and his sister Wynn flee from their father, who wants to sell his "changeling" daughter into slavery. I'm not sure what to think about Elric -- on one hand, he would do anything to protect his sister, but on the other hand impatience, frustration, and worry often get the best of him, and he acts like a big jerk. I suppose that's not uncommon behavior among siblings.

    Wynn is an interesting character too. She has developmental delays, and Elric sometimes sees her as a burden, but she still has something to teach her brother.