Modern Mindfulness: How to Be More Relaxed, Focused, and Kind While Living in a Fast, Digital, Always-On World

Modern Mindfulness: How to Be More Relaxed, Focused, and Kind While Living in a Fast, Digital, Always-On World

Switching off is the last thinkg we need to do to be more mindul, calm, and happy. Modern Mindfulness gives you the ideas, principles, and techniques you you need to bring awareness, composure, and kindness to whatever you are doing. Filled with more than sixty practical exercises, the author s approach brings the benefits of meditation to even the busiest of lives.Ideas f...

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Title:Modern Mindfulness: How to Be More Relaxed, Focused, and Kind While Living in a Fast, Digital, Always-On World
Author:Rohan Gunatillake
Rating:
ISBN:1250116414
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:240 pages

Modern Mindfulness: How to Be More Relaxed, Focused, and Kind While Living in a Fast, Digital, Always-On World Reviews

  • Kazen
    Jan 25, 2017

    My job can be stressful so my friend recommended a meditation app, something I could do during stolen moments that would help me gain a little peace. I sat down in the hospital coffee shop and... I tried. I really did. But I had to crank up the sound to drown out a crying baby, people were looking at me funny, and I kept opening one eye to make sure my purse was still there. Still lots of stress, not so much peace.

    Gunatillake outlines a method that doesn't require quiet or closed eyes or even st

    My job can be stressful so my friend recommended a meditation app, something I could do during stolen moments that would help me gain a little peace. I sat down in the hospital coffee shop and... I tried. I really did. But I had to crank up the sound to drown out a crying baby, people were looking at me funny, and I kept opening one eye to make sure my purse was still there. Still lots of stress, not so much peace.

    Gunatillake outlines a method that doesn't require quiet or closed eyes or even stillness. There are exercises you can do while walking, commuting, and sitting at your computer. Modern life feels hectic but there are many moments we can leverage to get back in touch with our body and mind.

    There are six core techniques that start with simpler, easier to grasp topics (relaxation, focus, being present) and move through more complex ideas (coping, connection, going deeper). Each has a guided meditation which, to be honest, I was skeptical of, but ended up liking them more than any audio meditations I've tried. Here's part of one I read while commuting by train:

    I was standing and that was okay. I was slouching, and that was okay. I could look out the window while taking stock of my body for as long as I needed without anyone mumbling in my ear about the next thing. All okay, all relaxing and peaceful.

    After each core meditation there are ten related mobile exercises and they are my favorite part of the book. Many are linked with some kind of trigger that act as reminders throughout your day to check in and be mindful. For example, now and then eat breakfast with no distractions, concentrating on the experience of eating. When you pick up your phone note why you reached for it - boredom? loneliness? - and try sitting with that emotion instead of checking twitter. When you see someone on the street who's happy let that feeling resonate with you and celebrate with them.

    I now have ways to be mindful when I step out the door, when I have a minute between patients, and when my mind is racing on the bus ride home. It's exactly what I wanted and needed.

    Some more of the good - Gunatillake keeps mindfulness and religion in separate boxes, which this agnostic appreciates. And he points out that some techniques won't work, and that's okay:

    In the introduction he says that formal practice (sitting and concentrating on the breath) is secondary to the mobile exercises. This made me very happy... until chapter eight or so, when the story changes to 'but really, formal practice is important and the base of mindfulness, so make sure you do it'. I may have been more receptive to this switch if I were working through the books and techniques slowly, but it was a frustrating change when reading the book in one go.

    My other critique is that Gunatillake's scope is narrow, with meditations centered on experiences of white collar workers commuting via public transportation. He assumes that everyone works at an office and is surrounded by concrete which is distancing if, like me, you don't. "I don't know if you've noticed yet but meetings at work are really boring," he says, so clearly he's never met with a bunch of interpreters! (Seriously, it's our job to a) talk, b) care, and c) do what needs doing. It makes for great meetings.)

    Anywho... people who live in the country will laugh at the idea of "spend[ing] a short time experiencing a park or a green space", and there's a lack of techniques tailored to service jobs or manual labor or even driving. It doesn't take away from the exercises but it feels like a missed opportunity.

    That being said I really like

    . I'm looking forward to going back through it slowly and spending a week or two on each core technique while building up my mindfulness muscle. If you've been meditating for a while you may not squeeze as much out of the pages but it was just what this neophyte needed.

  • Kristine
    Jan 06, 2017

    Not long before New Year's Day 2017, I made it my resolution to put aside digital screens and focus more on face-to-face contact. Luckily, this book is much of the same mindset while also acknowledging that digital contact is an unavoidable part of daily life. Where some people may believe that mindfulness may be too impractical or difficult to achieve, Gunatillake simplifies daily activities to be don

    Not long before New Year's Day 2017, I made it my resolution to put aside digital screens and focus more on face-to-face contact. Luckily, this book is much of the same mindset while also acknowledging that digital contact is an unavoidable part of daily life. Where some people may believe that mindfulness may be too impractical or difficult to achieve, Gunatillake simplifies daily activities to be done on the move, encourages readers to remain in the present moment, and offers tips and ideas to create a personalized technique.

  • Smudgedink7
    Feb 02, 2017

    This book gives readers insight on how to practice mindfulness without escaping to the idealistic view of what meditation should be. Both methods are effective but for most, fitting it into busy schedules is the only way that it is going to happen. The author details how to make mindfulness possible anywhere. Structured logically, the book provides overviews, descriptions, exercises, and even the author’s own examples. Its dense subject matter yet it’s not overwhelming. The author addresses doub

    This book gives readers insight on how to practice mindfulness without escaping to the idealistic view of what meditation should be. Both methods are effective but for most, fitting it into busy schedules is the only way that it is going to happen. The author details how to make mindfulness possible anywhere. Structured logically, the book provides overviews, descriptions, exercises, and even the author’s own examples. Its dense subject matter yet it’s not overwhelming. The author addresses doubt that may come with certain methods and dispels naysayers ie technology isn’t something to escape from but is a tool to reach your inner peace. If technology wasn’t present, someone could easily find something else to distract themselves – like cleaning instead of working. The author takes care to address multiple techniques to meet the needs of an array of individuals. It was well written.

    I received a copy from NetGalley.

  • Rachael  (Taylor&Kensington)
    Jan 24, 2017

    Highly recommend this book for anyone thinking of trying meditation or mindfulness. I plan to purchase this book in a physical copy to annotate and reread the information here! I can't wait to incorporate some of these meditation practices into my daily life!

  • Craig Carignan
    Feb 17, 2017

    Good book, very easy read and full of tips to help with Mindfulness