The March Against Fear

The March Against Fear

James Meredith's 1966 march in Mississippi began as one man's peaceful protest for voter registration and became one of the South's most important demonstrations of the civil rights movement. It brought together leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael, who formed an unlikely alliance that resulted in the Black Power movement, which ushered in a new era i...

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Title:The March Against Fear
Author:Ann Bausum
Rating:
ISBN:1426326653
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:128 pages

The March Against Fear Reviews

  • Kristin
    Feb 17, 2017

    The march against fear signaled the death of the civil rights movement, showcasing a fracturing coalition, conflicting messages, and how even the work of one loan eccentric (James Meredith) can send far-reaching aftershocks throughout a mass action.

    Absolute brutality from whites permeated this march, and tensions rose during its exhaustive duration. While MLK's assassination was the nail in the coffin of the movement, this march caused it to slowly fall apart. Interesting and of course horrifyin

    The march against fear signaled the death of the civil rights movement, showcasing a fracturing coalition, conflicting messages, and how even the work of one loan eccentric (James Meredith) can send far-reaching aftershocks throughout a mass action.

    Absolute brutality from whites permeated this march, and tensions rose during its exhaustive duration. While MLK's assassination was the nail in the coffin of the movement, this march caused it to slowly fall apart. Interesting and of course horrifying.

  • Mary Librarian
    Feb 11, 2017

    I've read quite a bit about Civil Rights but I don't think I've read any on this particular March.

    Found the writing to be good and the story well researched. All the photos with captions made it all too real.

    Very timely.

  • Handd51
    Jan 28, 2017

    Thank you, Nat Geo for a fabulous breakfast with my author friend Ann Bausum - and her newest book, the story of the "last great walk of the civil rights movement and the emergence of black power." The March against Fear happened in June 1966 when James Meredith decided to walk from Memphis to Jackson MS to show that no one should be afraid to walk. And then he was shot. Civil Rights leaders including MLK and Stokely Carmichael picked up the Walk, built it to a March, and pushed it to the finish

    Thank you, Nat Geo for a fabulous breakfast with my author friend Ann Bausum - and her newest book, the story of the "last great walk of the civil rights movement and the emergence of black power." The March against Fear happened in June 1966 when James Meredith decided to walk from Memphis to Jackson MS to show that no one should be afraid to walk. And then he was shot. Civil Rights leaders including MLK and Stokely Carmichael picked up the Walk, built it to a March, and pushed it to the finish - but not without challenges along the way. Ann helps readers understand the complicated relationships and conflicting ideas and goals of the marchers in a read that may be about historic events but helps us understand events of today. This may have been written for middle and high school student, but any reader of any age interested in currect events regarding race relations could appreciate ideas in this book.

  • Stacy Renee  (LazyDayLit)
    Feb 20, 2017

    Review coming soon.

  • Christopher
    Feb 02, 2017

    Another winner from Ann Bausum that gives young readers a "you are there" feeling. However, the font is super teeny tiny making this a difficult read at times.

  • Kathy
    Feb 10, 2017

    A gripping account of the last great Civil Rights march from Memphis TN to Jackson MS in 1966. Bausum tells this well-written and suspenseful story chronologically, and fills with of documented quotations, photographs, and informative details. This is timely, too, in the way she explains the climate of that time, noting the "layer of distance" between blacks and whites. "That layer of distance made it easier for southern whites to define African Americans as outsiders, as others. When people are

    A gripping account of the last great Civil Rights march from Memphis TN to Jackson MS in 1966. Bausum tells this well-written and suspenseful story chronologically, and fills with of documented quotations, photographs, and informative details. This is timely, too, in the way she explains the climate of that time, noting the "layer of distance" between blacks and whites. "That layer of distance made it easier for southern whites to define African Americans as outsiders, as others. When people are viewed as others, they stop being seen as fellow human beings and are judged by their differences instead of their commonalities. Those differences can become threatening, can become something to be afraid of, something to oppress. Othering breeds a curious loop of fear." [40-41]. Another excellent non-fiction book by an author who has written notably about civil rights marches before.

  • Molly Dettmann
    Feb 21, 2017

    "The work remains unfinished. And so the march continues."

    Wow, this book looks at the little known Civil Rights March known as the March Against Fear and the emergence of black power (kinda what we would know today as Black Lives Matter). Sadly, I learned about many Civil Rights figures I had never heard of before and it gave lots of insight on how black people felt during this time, what they were marching for, and the power dynamics and fear that kept white people in power during these times e

    "The work remains unfinished. And so the march continues."

    Wow, this book looks at the little known Civil Rights March known as the March Against Fear and the emergence of black power (kinda what we would know today as Black Lives Matter). Sadly, I learned about many Civil Rights figures I had never heard of before and it gave lots of insight on how black people felt during this time, what they were marching for, and the power dynamics and fear that kept white people in power during these times especially. My only complaint was that the font was super tiny.

  • Mrs Mommy Booknerd http://mrsmommybooknerd.blogspot.com
    Feb 22, 2017

    This book is fantastic. I think that the topics of fear, injustice and difficult to explain history is hard to teach to younger children, but this book captures all it complexities and details beautifully. This book is packed with factual information that engages the reader and that amazing text is accompanied by pictures and quotes that deepen the reading experience. It is brilliant and important reading for children and their parents. A must read for today's time, which allows us to learn from

    This book is fantastic. I think that the topics of fear, injustice and difficult to explain history is hard to teach to younger children, but this book captures all it complexities and details beautifully. This book is packed with factual information that engages the reader and that amazing text is accompanied by pictures and quotes that deepen the reading experience. It is brilliant and important reading for children and their parents. A must read for today's time, which allows us to learn from past mistakes, to highlight those that changed history and to find ways to make the world a better place. A beautifully and thoughtful book.

  • Kristi Bernard
    Feb 23, 2017

    “James Meredith was already famous before he got shot on June 6, 1966. Indeed, his fame probably made him a target for attack and his fame certainly accounted for why his shooting made the national news. Otherwise he would have been just the latest overlooked victim of white-on-black violence in a state where whites had used violence – and fear of violence – to secure their supremacy since the era of slavery.”

    James H. Meredith was born in 1933. After the integration of Mississippi, he developed

    “James Meredith was already famous before he got shot on June 6, 1966. Indeed, his fame probably made him a target for attack and his fame certainly accounted for why his shooting made the national news. Otherwise he would have been just the latest overlooked victim of white-on-black violence in a state where whites had used violence – and fear of violence – to secure their supremacy since the era of slavery.”

    James H. Meredith was born in 1933. After the integration of Mississippi, he developed a reputation of being a quirky loner within the civil rights movement. He knew early on that his destiny was to serve as a leader for the oppressed members of his race. He was tired of being afraid of white people and decided to walk from Memphis Tennessee to Jackson Mississippi. This 220-mile journey, wasn’t going to be a protest in Meredith’s eyes but as something ordinary that anyone could do. He set out on his event on June 5, 1966. Once the announcement was released black people from across the country began crossing in Meredith’s name.

    Author Ann Bausum is sharing a historic story about one of the greatest protests during the civil rights movement. Black and white photos of marches and the story of a man who no longer wanted to be afraid make this piece of history worth sharing. Although some of the details may be disturbing this true account is worth the read. The back of the book has the Author’s Note which gives readers more insight about why this story needed to be told. Parents and teachers can use this as a guide to open dialogue regarding racial issues of the present day.

  • Lauren
    Feb 25, 2017

    Every teen should read this book to learn about the fairly unknown (in today's education) march that basically signaled the end of the Civil Rights Movement as it had been. Readers will witness ugly racism in America and the power of protest.

    Aside story: Last night during a game night at the library I was playing a game called 5 Second Rule with the teens where you have 5 seconds to give 3 answers to a question on a card like "What are 3 college mascots?" One of the cards was "Name 3 leaders of

    Every teen should read this book to learn about the fairly unknown (in today's education) march that basically signaled the end of the Civil Rights Movement as it had been. Readers will witness ugly racism in America and the power of protest.

    Aside story: Last night during a game night at the library I was playing a game called 5 Second Rule with the teens where you have 5 seconds to give 3 answers to a question on a card like "What are 3 college mascots?" One of the cards was "Name 3 leaders of the Civil Rights Movement" and my teens that were in grades 6-12 couldn't name anyone but MLK Jr. So yeah, teens should read this book and others like it because our education system clearly isn't cutting it.