Three Days in January

Three Days in January

January 1961: President Eisenhower has three days to secure the nation's future before his young successor, John F. Kennedy, takes power — a final mission by the legendary leader who planned D-Day and guided America through the darkening Cold WarBret Baier, the Chief Political Anchor for Fox News Channel and the Anchor and Executive Editor of Special Report with Bret Baier...

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Title:Three Days in January
Author:Bret Baier
Rating:
ISBN:0062569066
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:368 pages

Three Days in January Reviews

  • Robert Walker
    Jan 12, 2017

    I had previously reviewed Three Days in January on Goodreads. It was a good book, but left out some things about Ike that I thought should have been included.

  • Robert Walker
    Dec 08, 2016

    Several weeks ago I won a proof copy of Three Days in January, a sympathetic biography of Dwight Eisenhower written by Bret Baier with Catherine Whitney.

    I don't see how any serious student of American history can help but admire Dwight Eisenhower as a man, a soldier, and as President of the United States. This certainly holds true with Mr. Baier. His book puts special emphasis on the final speech Ike made as President, which he gave 3 days before his successor John F. Kennedy was inaugurated.

    Several weeks ago I won a proof copy of Three Days in January, a sympathetic biography of Dwight Eisenhower written by Bret Baier with Catherine Whitney.

    I don't see how any serious student of American history can help but admire Dwight Eisenhower as a man, a soldier, and as President of the United States. This certainly holds true with Mr. Baier. His book puts special emphasis on the final speech Ike made as President, which he gave 3 days before his successor John F. Kennedy was inaugurated.

    Three Days in January is a fascinating work. I learned a lot. For instance, while I knew Eisenhower met several times and had a friendly relationship with his Russian counterpart, General Georgy Zhukov, I was not aware that he enjoyed that same type of relationship with Russian Premier Nikita Khrushchev. When Russian nuclear missiles were discovered on Cuba during President Kennedy's administration, JFK consulted Ike, seeking his opinion on the likely hood of Khrushchev starting a nuclear war if the US put a naval blockade around that island. Relying on friendly conversations about the use of nuclear weapons he previously had with the Premier, Ike gave President Kennedy an educated answer that he did not think Khrushchev would resort to that. Ike was right.

    Now for the bad stuff: The book fails to mention Ike's alleged affair with Kay Summersby during WWII, and also ignores the deal he made with Earl Warren during the 1952 campaign for the Republican nomination for President. If Warren would drop out of the campaign and shift his support to him, Ike would nominate Warren for Justice of the Supreme Court at the first opportunity. Warren did and Ike did. Warren became Chief Justice. Eisenhower later said he made a mistake in doing this.

    Three Days in January was well researched, well written, and deserves 4 stars.

    Robert Walker

  • TK
    Dec 21, 2016

    I knew little to nothing about Eisenhower before I read this book. I really enjoyed learning about Eisenhower's life and career through the lens of the transition of power to Kennedy. Baier shows a lot of what makes a good leader, and what those hallmarks were for Eisenhower. I am not normally a history reader but I found this book engrossing and full of fascinating facts and context.

  • Amanda
    Jan 01, 2017

    This book is really good . I learned more about Eisenhower then I ever knew before. I had no idea his wife was the one of his life or how close he was to her even though he had all these other responsibilities and duties she was more important to him. That's how love and marriage should be. Also he just was a force to be reckoned with when it came to Wars.

  • Robert Melnyk
    Feb 18, 2017

    I really enjoyed this book. Although it does provide some history of Eisenhower's life and career, both as a general and as president, it focuses on the transition of power from Eisenhower to Kennedy, in January of 1961. The book provided a great deal of fascinating insight into both men, their relationship, and how each viewed the responsibilities of the presidency. Definitely worth the read if you are interested in American history, especially presidential history.

  • Dan Graser
    Jan 16, 2017

    While I genuinely have a great deal of respect for Bret Baier and the work he does (especially his debate moderations), this is not very good writing, biography, or critical examination. It's quite hard in fact to determine who this could be written for. Those hoping for a great amount of biographical material will be disappointed. Those hoping for an examination of the 34th President in office will be disappointed. Those hoping for a critical examination of the meaning of Ike's legendary farewe

    While I genuinely have a great deal of respect for Bret Baier and the work he does (especially his debate moderations), this is not very good writing, biography, or critical examination. It's quite hard in fact to determine who this could be written for. Those hoping for a great amount of biographical material will be disappointed. Those hoping for an examination of the 34th President in office will be disappointed. Those hoping for a critical examination of the meaning of Ike's legendary farewell address will be sorely disappointed, especially given the title of this book. I suppose if you genuinely have never read anything about Eisenhower or have little pre-existing knowledge of this speech then this could be a good précis, otherwise I would encourage you to look elsewhere. Especially pointless and ridiculously disconnected is a short coda at the end of the book trying to connect the transfers of power from Ike to Kennedy to the current transfer of power from Obama to Trump. Tenuous doesn't even begin to describe the connections Baier tries to make and the book would have been better without it. All in all, a disappointing read from a political commentator (and debate moderator) I normally enjoy.

  • Roger Feenstra
    Jan 26, 2017

    Dwight D. Eisenhower, born October 14, 1890, was our 34th President (1953-1961). He came into office one year before I was born. He was reelected to a second term, holding the office of President for eight years. Eisenhower, or "Ike" is the first president I can remember as a boy. It is a vague recollection, but I have a memory of driving with my parents and listening to a conversation they were having focused on the president.

    Dwight D. Eisenhower was a great general in the U.S. Army. His leade

    Dwight D. Eisenhower, born October 14, 1890, was our 34th President (1953-1961). He came into office one year before I was born. He was reelected to a second term, holding the office of President for eight years. Eisenhower, or "Ike" is the first president I can remember as a boy. It is a vague recollection, but I have a memory of driving with my parents and listening to a conversation they were having focused on the president.

    Dwight D. Eisenhower was a great general in the U.S. Army. His leadership and strategy on D-Day perhaps won the war against the Nazi's and freed the world of Hitler's existential threat. During his service as General, President Harry Truman, a Democrat, urged him to run for president, but that was before Truman learned Ike was a Republican. Once that was revealed Truman remarked,

    So much for bi-partisan politics.

    Eisenhower held the first televised news conference (in 1965), and was the first president to be videotaped and broadcast in color, in 1958.

    Ike grew up knowing what it meant to work hard, something many young people today have lost the meaning of. He remarked,

    His leadership style was collegial, For Ike it was about study, listening, and reflection. He said,

    At the core of this sentiment is the idea that leadership isn't about simply pushing your own ideas. It's about conversation that demands mutual respect--the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.

    On D-Day, Ike carried a huge weight on his shoulders. Operation Overlord, as it was called, was a staggering enterprise, whose risk-reward ratio was incalculable. The Allied planners knew going in that the casualties would be large, and perhaps thousands of men would be sacrificed on the desolate shores to a greater purpose. Yet they must try. When that fateful day approached, Ike gave the "Order of the day",

    It needs to be noted Eisenhower was against the use of the nuclear bomb. He made that clear to President Truman. But it was Democrat Truman who had his finger on the button, and two Japanese cites and citizens were wiped off the face of the earth. The sad truth was, it all might have been avoided had not Truman insisted on unconditional surrender. Given a chance to 'save face', the Japanese might have come to the table. Ike sought peace during his tenure.

    As Ike's term as president came to a close, he was asked what kind of a United States he would like his grandchildren to live in,

    As Eisenhower stepped from the world stage in 1961, a younger, less experienced man, John F. Kennedy, took his place. Eisenhower died on March 28, 1969. Famed news broadcaster Walter Cronkite commented, the death of Eisenhower

    Bret Baier's book Three Days in January is worth the time to read. It is well written and provides a snapshot of America during the 1950's, perhaps one of the last decades of innocence in our nation.

  • Steve
    Jan 30, 2017

    An interesting book on the life and the presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower. Eisenhower became president during the Cold War era in the early 1950's. His leadership was tested during that time, I'm sure but he was up to the task. Eisenhower was the supreme commander of the Allied troops in Europe during World War II and planned the D Day invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. He proved his leadership in the military battlefield as well as the political battlefield. I have also read in this book an

    An interesting book on the life and the presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower. Eisenhower became president during the Cold War era in the early 1950's. His leadership was tested during that time, I'm sure but he was up to the task. Eisenhower was the supreme commander of the Allied troops in Europe during World War II and planned the D Day invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944. He proved his leadership in the military battlefield as well as the political battlefield. I have also read in this book and in previous books about Dwight Eisenhower that he grew up in Kansas and that his parents were Mennonites, which opposed war and was disappointed when Eisenhower went to West Point to the United States Military Academy.

  • Buddy Draper
    Feb 17, 2017

    Baier focuses on the transition of power between Ike and JFK, giving some important context and analysis. I haven’t read a biography of Eisenhower and so I appreciated this book with its understanding of how Ike positively impacted our nation’s history.

  • Rob
    Feb 26, 2017

    Bret Baier, chief political anchor for Fox News, has done a good job putting together a well-written, enjoyable read of Eisenhower’s presidency. If you like presidential politics, “Three Days in January” is not only an interesting look at Eisenhower’s philosophy in dealing with Congress and foreign policy, but it has rich, ironic parallels to today’s tumultuous times. Ike offers some wonderful lessons in leadership applicable to today’s era of polarization and gridlock. Overall, it’s a riveting

    Bret Baier, chief political anchor for Fox News, has done a good job putting together a well-written, enjoyable read of Eisenhower’s presidency. If you like presidential politics, “Three Days in January” is not only an interesting look at Eisenhower’s philosophy in dealing with Congress and foreign policy, but it has rich, ironic parallels to today’s tumultuous times. Ike offers some wonderful lessons in leadership applicable to today’s era of polarization and gridlock. Overall, it’s a riveting account of Eisenhower’s determination to end the Korean conflict and prepare America for the perils of a new war – the Cold War.