Train I Ride

Train I Ride

Rydr is on a train heading east, leaving California, where her gramma can’t take care of her anymore, and traveling to Chicago to live with an unknown relative. She brings with her a suitcase, memories both happy and sad, and a box containing something very important.As Rydr meets her fellow passengers and learns their stories, her own past begins to emerge. And as much as...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Train I Ride
Author:Paul Mosier
Rating:
ISBN:0062455737
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:192 pages

Train I Ride Reviews

  • Rebecca
    Aug 16, 2016

    There is a Portugese word,

    , having to do with absence and melancholy, that unites happiness and sadness, happiness in the idea or memory of someone or something that is not there. To me,

    is the comforting, aching sound of a distant train whistle in the middle of the night; it is the thought of paths taken and not taken, the knowledge of permanent incompleteness.

    , the beautiful new novel by Paul Mosier, is all about

    .

    This is one of the very best middle grade bo

    There is a Portugese word,

    , having to do with absence and melancholy, that unites happiness and sadness, happiness in the idea or memory of someone or something that is not there. To me,

    is the comforting, aching sound of a distant train whistle in the middle of the night; it is the thought of paths taken and not taken, the knowledge of permanent incompleteness.

    , the beautiful new novel by Paul Mosier, is all about

    .

    This is one of the very best middle grade books I have read in a long time. In its themes, plot, and main character, it reminds me of

    (a nearly perfect book), but for all its painful moments is more gentle than that classic, more simply written, more soulful, and is often quite funny. Rydr is a twelve-year-old who knows that "lots of things that are worth seeing aren't happy things." With her mother and grandmother dead and her father unknown, she has tremendous pain in her life, yet she knows how to appreciate people and moments, whether they are sweet or ugly.

    Paul Mosier impressed me in two major ways. The first is that he understands so much of how it is to be a girl, especially a troubled girl on her own. Rydr is in some ways very young, in other ways too old; she is in over her head and meets each challenge sometimes with bafflement and anger, other times with cleverness and humor. She has had enough (albeit minimal) trusted adults in her life that, refreshingly, she has learned to take good advice. The way Rydr has opportunities to put remembered advice to good use makes the novel's lessons wise without being preachy: it's all about survival, not goodness per se (though I want to be clear that Rydr is a naturally compassionate, generous person). The lives of girls are perilous, and I am grateful to Mosier for giving young readers actual information that they can think about and use. This is probably the most valuable reason to read

    .

    My favorite reason to read the book, though, is that it is set almost entirely on a train. I read it because of the cover (congratulations to the cover artist, by the way, who has exactly expressed Mosier's story); the whole book is, in a way, a love poem to train culture. Mosier perfectly captures the generosity and congeniality of the long-distance train social atmosphere, indeed captures every detail of the Amtrak Southwest Chief. But the train is so much more than just an arbitrary setting, and so much more than a metaphor for a journey. Set in any other place, Rydr's tale would have been just another one in a thousand orphan stories, perhaps more gracefully told than the rest, but not genius. Set on the Amtrak, though...! I could write pages about all the different meaningful, wonderful ways the brilliant setting enriches the story. I'll only say here, though, that plot-wise, this story is all about Rydr meeting good people, and there are no better people than those you meet on the train, and no easier way to meet them than having to share a table. Mood-wise, and most wonderfully, the train evokes both haunting melancholy and hopefulness, the meeting place of past and future in an elongated present. It is the perfect place for Rydr, with all her limited resources, in the confines of the coaches, to be given the time to appreciate where she comes from and who she is, and choose who she wants to be.

    I devoured this book in three and a half hours. It's brevity and simplicity are deceptive, though; there is a whole lot to this novel, a lot to appreciate and discuss. I'll be enthusiastically recommending it to adults and to kids age 8-13 (or older if they like shorter books and simpler language).

  • Eleri
    Sep 17, 2016

    Train I Ride was a beautiful, deeply moving book that I savored from beginning to end. It wasn't that kind of book that you can rush through every page and pick up a few words as you go, but you're still confused and dazed. This book was nothing like that. It drew me in and was as satisfying and savory as a chocolate truffle; I never wanted it to draw to a close. But when I did, I was so satisfied that it ended because of how breathtakingly beautiful it was. I'm surprised how this story only too

    Train I Ride was a beautiful, deeply moving book that I savored from beginning to end. It wasn't that kind of book that you can rush through every page and pick up a few words as you go, but you're still confused and dazed. This book was nothing like that. It drew me in and was as satisfying and savory as a chocolate truffle; I never wanted it to draw to a close. But when I did, I was so satisfied that it ended because of how breathtakingly beautiful it was. I'm surprised how this story only took place in 3 days, but it seemed much longer. I loved how Rydr changed in the course of 3 days. She had such an amazing personality that was very strong and couldn't be replaced. The characters she met were amazing in their own ways. This book was sad and silent but was loud and powerful and at times, hillarious. I would reccomend this book to everyone that likes a good story with all of the elements: happy, sad, angry, frightening, bittersweet, funny, and beautiful.

  • Mary
    Feb 07, 2017

    Beautifully written. A lot of emotion.

  • Amy
    Jan 20, 2017

    3.5 stars As a teenager, I rode the Amtrak line from Chicago to Battle Creek once a month in the 80s to visit my dad, step-mom, and grandparents. In reading Train I Ride, I couldn't help but recall those trips and the countless soft microwaveable pizzas I ate from the Cafe Car. Sadly, I don't remember someone like Neal serving that rubbery round snack to me. I just remember the stomach ache I would get after eating it.

    "Train" is marketed as a middle grade novel, but I would recommend it to 6th g

    3.5 stars As a teenager, I rode the Amtrak line from Chicago to Battle Creek once a month in the 80s to visit my dad, step-mom, and grandparents. In reading Train I Ride, I couldn't help but recall those trips and the countless soft microwaveable pizzas I ate from the Cafe Car. Sadly, I don't remember someone like Neal serving that rubbery round snack to me. I just remember the stomach ache I would get after eating it.

    "Train" is marketed as a middle grade novel, but I would recommend it to 6th grade and above. The things that Rydr has experienced in life are heavy and depressing. And while there are some bright moments in the book, the majority of it is example after example of Rydr working through what has happened to her. There are important characters on the train that unknowingly and knowingly help her process and grieve. "Train" reminds you to reach out to those who are difficult to love. There are always reasons why we are the way we are.

    Side note: The Book jacket is absolutely amazing! If Amtrak had a book store, this book would certainly need to be a part of it. Now that would be a novel idea!

  • Kayla Collins
    Feb 06, 2017

    I want to hunt down this author. Paul Mosier makes me ashamed to call myself a writer because this is so well written and poetic that I gasped reading it.To say that this was an amazing book would be an understatement, it was deep, beautiful, and meaningful. As soon as I saw this book, I was attracted to it. It's one of those books that you just know is going to be good. If I had kids, I would read this book to them. The book is a serious pick me up, and I felt so hopeful reading it. Rydr has a

    I want to hunt down this author. Paul Mosier makes me ashamed to call myself a writer because this is so well written and poetic that I gasped reading it.To say that this was an amazing book would be an understatement, it was deep, beautiful, and meaningful. As soon as I saw this book, I was attracted to it. It's one of those books that you just know is going to be good. If I had kids, I would read this book to them. The book is a serious pick me up, and I felt so hopeful reading it. Rydr has a real story, one that is sad and more commonplace than it should be, but she's a good kid. She still has hope even though she doesn't think that she should. Rydr and her story are so inspiring. She made me want to slap myself for complaining. Overall, I adored this story so much. I will probably be quoting it for the rest of my life.

  • Megan Luke
    Feb 01, 2017

    This was a very quick read that I thoroughly enjoyed! The things Rydr has endured in her short life are enough to break most people but she has managed to come through strong and good. She is smart and has a tenacity about her that is inspiring.

    The adults she comes across on her journey are just who she needs in her life at this time. They don't treat her as if she is broken or try to fix her, they just love her. As a result of that one thing, each person is changed. As I was reading I tried t

    This was a very quick read that I thoroughly enjoyed! The things Rydr has endured in her short life are enough to break most people but she has managed to come through strong and good. She is smart and has a tenacity about her that is inspiring.

    The adults she comes across on her journey are just who she needs in her life at this time. They don't treat her as if she is broken or try to fix her, they just love her. As a result of that one thing, each person is changed. As I was reading I tried to put myself in the place of the different adults and wondered if I would respond the same way they did. I am pretty sure I would have tried to fix and probably would have coddled her. This story gave me an opportunity to see things in a different way and I am grateful for that.

  • Becky
    Feb 25, 2017

    Ryder is taking a train trip to her new home in Chicago after her grandmother has died.

    I enjoyed this book much more than I expected. After a slightly slow start, I couldn't put it down. Ryder goes through such an arc from beginning to end thanks to the people she meets along the way. At first I was a little annoyed by her constant search for money, but gosh, that was her life. The kid needed to eat and she was ambitious in finding ways to do so, and in her own way, too proud to admit how hungry

    Ryder is taking a train trip to her new home in Chicago after her grandmother has died.

    I enjoyed this book much more than I expected. After a slightly slow start, I couldn't put it down. Ryder goes through such an arc from beginning to end thanks to the people she meets along the way. At first I was a little annoyed by her constant search for money, but gosh, that was her life. The kid needed to eat and she was ambitious in finding ways to do so, and in her own way, too proud to admit how hungry and needy she was. A great coming of age story in a small volume that can be quickly devoured.

  • Meredith
    Feb 24, 2017

    Editors, take note: You CAN publish a solid middle-grade novel full of complex characters and situations that is LESS THAN 200 PAGES. I laughed, I cried. Held back a star for a couple of scenes that stretched the definition of "realistic" fiction.

    p. 32: "Everything here looks crazy, like it was drawn by Dr. Seuss. The plants and rocks, especially in the desert, look like they're from beneath the sea. They look like they were drawn to be silly."

    p. 90: "My timeline stretches behind me, a chart of

    Editors, take note: You CAN publish a solid middle-grade novel full of complex characters and situations that is LESS THAN 200 PAGES. I laughed, I cried. Held back a star for a couple of scenes that stretched the definition of "realistic" fiction.

    p. 32: "Everything here looks crazy, like it was drawn by Dr. Seuss. The plants and rocks, especially in the desert, look like they're from beneath the sea. They look like they were drawn to be silly."

    p. 90: "My timeline stretches behind me, a chart of other people's mistakes and bad choices and sadness that put me in this seat on this train on this night."

    p. 95: "I've never heard or seen the word but I'm sure I've felt it. The whole thing is like something I've always felt but could never understand."

    p. 145: "Even before she died, I was always a motherless child"

  • Steph
    Feb 24, 2017

    Once in awhile I pick up an unassuming middle grade novel and can't put it down; the kind that I lay in bed and think about and have to get up at 2am to keep reading. And when I turn the last page of a book like that I grin and calm myself from allllllll the feelings and think about it and how it's changed me. These characters... I needed them as much as Rydr needed them; Neal, Dorothea, Carlos, and even Tenderchunks.

    I can truly say I will never forget this book. Thank you, Mr. Mosier, for shar

    Once in awhile I pick up an unassuming middle grade novel and can't put it down; the kind that I lay in bed and think about and have to get up at 2am to keep reading. And when I turn the last page of a book like that I grin and calm myself from allllllll the feelings and think about it and how it's changed me. These characters... I needed them as much as Rydr needed them; Neal, Dorothea, Carlos, and even Tenderchunks.

    I can truly say I will never forget this book. Thank you, Mr. Mosier, for sharing your beautiful story.

    --•--•--•--•--•--•--•--•--•--•--•--•--•--

    " Carlos shifts in his seat. He folds his hands on the table before him, and leans toward me. 'What will the little leaf do when it's cast to the wind?'

    I shrug. 'It'll try to fly.'

    'And what will the little fruit do if it falls to earth?'

    It's almost unbearably nice for him to wonder, to ask. 'It'll hit the ground running.' "

  • Boni
    Feb 26, 2017

    Beautifully written, heartbreaking, wonderful.