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The thrilling sequel to the Nebula and Hugo winning Binti.It’s been a year since Binti and Okwu enrolled at Oomza University. A year since Binti was declared a hero for uniting two warring planets. A year since she left her family to pursue her dream.And now she must return home to her people, with her friend Okwu by her side, to face her family and face her elders.But Okw...

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Title:Home
Author:Nnedi Okorafor
Rating:
ISBN:0765393107
Edition Language:English
Format Type:ebook
Number of Pages:176 pages

Home Reviews

  • Lindsay
    Feb 02, 2017

    Binti has been at Oomza University for a while now and while she has learned much, she struggles with post-traumatic stress from her original encounter with the Meduse and a new anger she feels within herself more and more. That's a huge problem for someone who's supposed to be a master harmonizer and a master of meditation through mathematics. She believes that the issue is that she needs to return home and go on pilgrimage with other Himba. This book follows her return to her family with her f

    Binti has been at Oomza University for a while now and while she has learned much, she struggles with post-traumatic stress from her original encounter with the Meduse and a new anger she feels within herself more and more. That's a huge problem for someone who's supposed to be a master harmonizer and a master of meditation through mathematics. She believes that the issue is that she needs to return home and go on pilgrimage with other Himba. This book follows her return to her family with her friend, the Meduse Okwu.

    The world that Binti inhabits is still deeply weird, with strange technology and alien interactions that feel like magic, along with cultures that feel very alien, but are actually real cultures in Africa. This is clearly a second book in a trilogy and doesn't wrap up anywhere near as neatly as the first book, but what it does do is give a reasonable explanation for the central deus ex machina from the first book (Binti's possession of the

    ).

    Looking forward to the third one.

  • Mitticus
    Feb 10, 2017

    is the aftermath of Binti going to Oomza Uni. Many changes in so little time, and she feels then is time to go home, to her pilgrimage.

    There is so many themes here that I hesitate for where start. There is sci-fi that appeals to different ways of thinking , and made us aware of a future with other eyes and ethics. And there is sci-fi that made us think about our idiosincracy. This is old school sci-f

    is the aftermath of Binti going to Oomza Uni. Many changes in so little time, and she feels then is time to go home, to her pilgrimage.

    There is so many themes here that I hesitate for where start. There is sci-fi that appeals to different ways of thinking , and made us aware of a future with other eyes and ethics. And there is sci-fi that made us think about our idiosincracy. This is old school sci-fi asking: we have to let go of ourselves to get live in another worlds? how much is too much or enough?

    The quandary of the girl with her family, and what is expected of her is universal.

    In another hand, we get trapped once more in the story for the strange culture, not the alien culture in case you're wondering, but for the Himba culture. I don't know how much is veridic or a piece of fantasy, but it's fascinating.

    --------------------

    Me sorprende de hecho la fascinación de la protagonista por el desierto rojo de Namibia, no creo que nadie que viva en el desierto sienta mucho amor por dunas y sol, sin contar con el frio horrible por la noche, sí, es lindo como turismo y sacar fotos, pero vivir alli es otro cuento (esto me recuerda a la pelicula de Lawrence de Arabia cuando comenta algo parecido Omar Shariff al mentado Lawrence). Uno ama el agua, las plantas, hasta el mar, pero no el desierto en sí ni la pampa.

    Hay temas para rato en el mundo de Binti

    We will see what happen after the cliffhanger.

    ----------------------------------

    Ideas después de terminar el libro:

    -termina en cliffhanger.

    -la segunda mitad del libro fue mejor que la primera.

    -quiero ver que pasa después.["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>

  • Rachel (Kalanadi)
    Nov 21, 2016

    3.5 stars

    After a year at Oomza University, Binti wants to return home. She's learned a lot, but hasn't made any close friends, except for Okwu, the Meduse who participated in the traumatic event of the first novella... and it is now her friend and a student at Oomza too.

    Binti is suffering from PTSD; she has panic attacks and nightmares. Disturbed that she has been experiencing extreme bouts of anger and rage, she wants to go home and participate in the pilgrimage that Himba women take into the d

    3.5 stars

    After a year at Oomza University, Binti wants to return home. She's learned a lot, but hasn't made any close friends, except for Okwu, the Meduse who participated in the traumatic event of the first novella... and it is now her friend and a student at Oomza too.

    Binti is suffering from PTSD; she has panic attacks and nightmares. Disturbed that she has been experiencing extreme bouts of anger and rage, she wants to go home and participate in the pilgrimage that Himba women take into the desert - an experience that should cleanse her. Okwu returns with her to Earth, but Binti doesn't get the homecoming and the rest that she desires.

    First impressions... Binti is really filled with anger. After her partial Meduse transformation, her body is changed, and perhaps her mind too, and she's struggling with understanding this. In

    she's constantly upset. She feels rejected, hurt, and attacked by her family and friends. Their reactions and instantaneous blame seemed uncalled for and rude to me! But I realize that I'm from the most individualistic culture in the world. Binti's people, the Himba, are the opposite: very focused on their tight-knit, insular community, rather than individual (and shockingly untraditional) achievements.

    For Binti's people, the Himba, there are strict gender roles and social expectations. While her people's traditions helped Binti before, I think here we see more closely how she is diverging from Himba ways, while desperately wanting to conform. She's painfully torn, resulting in a lot of hurtful emotional turmoil.

    Frustratingly to me, Binti doesn't quite come out and say that she wants to buck the expectations. But I also appreciate that it's incredibly realistic that she feels seemingly contradictory things. She was driven to leave home by her over-powering desire for education at Oomza University - and hasn't mentioned at all that she wants to marry. But when told by her people that "no boy will ever marry her now" because she isn't a good, traditional Himba girl, she's incredibly hurt.

    So, for me,

    is about the painful struggle to find one's identity, against family and community expectations. The character relationships seemed abrasive, abrupt, unaffectionate - but not unexpected to me, since I recognize this is the same reaction I've had to Okorafor's other books, especially character behavior in

    .

    I think the one thing people will dislike about this novella is its length. It seems to end after a very quick story arc - simply that Binti comes home and goes through an initiation ritual she did not expect. But she comes out changed once again.

    What I really hope for is that the third novella will show Binti actively accomplishing something with her identity and her ability. So far she has been focused on her self - looking inwards on her identity and her place in the world, where she comes from and where she wants to get to. But now it's time for her to accomplish something on her own, rather than having other people do it to her.

  • T (novelparadise)
    Feb 15, 2017

    This one definitely pleasantly surprised me! I read BINTI in December and wasn't a huge huge fan but I could see a lot of potential for the series so I decided to give the next one a chance. I'm very glad I did! HOME had a completely different atmosphere than BINTI and I think I enjoyed this one more! As with the first book, I still loved the writing style but I felt so much more immersed in this one! I loved reading about the Himba and the Enyi Zinariya and their cultures. Binti's struggl

    This one definitely pleasantly surprised me! I read BINTI in December and wasn't a huge huge fan but I could see a lot of potential for the series so I decided to give the next one a chance. I'm very glad I did! HOME had a completely different atmosphere than BINTI and I think I enjoyed this one more! As with the first book, I still loved the writing style but I felt so much more immersed in this one! I loved reading about the Himba and the Enyi Zinariya and their cultures. Binti's struggle to reconcile these two parts of herself, added with becoming part Meduse was very well done and felt very real.

    After the cliffhanger this book left on, I am definitely impatiently waiting for the release of the next book! I have high hopes that this series will just get better and better! Definitely recommend you check it out if you're looking for a fresh, unique sci-fi.

  • Tudor Vlad
    Feb 01, 2017

    Quite on par with the first novella, it benefits from being longer but it still felt too short for all the ideas coming out of it. The world and characters are further explored and Binti's journey of self-discovery continues with some curious results. I was somehow under the impression that this would end Binti's story but seeing as Home ends with a massive cliffhanger, I think it's safe to bet that there's more coming and I'm so so happy because of it.

  • Brad
    Jan 24, 2017

    Thanks to Netgalley for this ARC!

    This is my third Nnedi Okarafor and I think it's a definite improvement on the previous installment of Binti which read as pretty decent as a coming-of-age novel but was even better as a world-building novel.

    This sequel, or perhaps it should be considered an ongoing line of novellas following Binti, has her returning back to the home she had left so unceremoniously in the first novella, a full year later, only to encounter some interesting and sometimes painful r

    Thanks to Netgalley for this ARC!

    This is my third Nnedi Okarafor and I think it's a definite improvement on the previous installment of Binti which read as pretty decent as a coming-of-age novel but was even better as a world-building novel.

    This sequel, or perhaps it should be considered an ongoing line of novellas following Binti, has her returning back to the home she had left so unceremoniously in the first novella, a full year later, only to encounter some interesting and sometimes painful realizations.

    There's a lot of cool culture going on and even more interesting personal reveals about Binti that goes a long way to answer some of the questions that had annoyed me in the first one.

    This is very welcome news, indeed! I like continuing coming-of-age novels when they're done well and I think this fits the bill. :) I especially like how Binti grows in this one. :)

    No spoilers! But it's quite cool :)

  • Veronique
    Feb 04, 2017

    Having loved the first novella, I had great expectations for this sequel. The narrative picks up one year after the events that brought Binti to the Oomza University. She is studying, analysing her elan, but also dealing with the repercussions, emotional and physical, of the trauma of surviving the slaughter and of becoming the 'spokesperson' for the Meduse. On top of this, she is homesick.

    does feel quite different although Okorafor still masterly blends futuristic civilisations with ancie

    Having loved the first novella, I had great expectations for this sequel. The narrative picks up one year after the events that brought Binti to the Oomza University. She is studying, analysing her elan, but also dealing with the repercussions, emotional and physical, of the trauma of surviving the slaughter and of becoming the 'spokesperson' for the Meduse. On top of this, she is homesick.

    does feel quite different although Okorafor still masterly blends futuristic civilisations with ancient cultures. This kind of combination, the very old to the very new, or indeed the very far to the very near, is not only present in the setting but also in the plot. It is still fascinating to follow Binti in her discoveries, especially of her own nature. I found it particularly telling that prejudice can be found everywhere - even people who have suffered from it can also have their own prejudices against others. We are to a certain extend the result of our education, but, as sentient beings, we can also go beyond this and free ourselves of those limitations.

    Okorafor once more delivers. The only problem is that now I have to wait for the third instalment...

  • Paige (Enchantology)
    Feb 04, 2017
  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    Feb 05, 2017

    Can you ever go home again? Binti returns to her home planet and is faced with navigating a complex political landscape with the Meduse, Okwu, as well as her own transformation. Family expectations have her preparing for a pilgrimage, but the people in the desert may have their own plans (or it is her destiny.) As always I very much enjoy the unique ways Okorafor blends various African folklores and mythologies with magic, outer space, aliens, and this time, with math! to create a vibrant and im

    Can you ever go home again? Binti returns to her home planet and is faced with navigating a complex political landscape with the Meduse, Okwu, as well as her own transformation. Family expectations have her preparing for a pilgrimage, but the people in the desert may have their own plans (or it is her destiny.) As always I very much enjoy the unique ways Okorafor blends various African folklores and mythologies with magic, outer space, aliens, and this time, with math! to create a vibrant and imaginative landscape. The pregnant ship was so interesting! The ending felt rushed and I wish all of Binti was a longer story. There are so many rich and unique elements, that I wanted to spend more time with more instances of them.

  • Kirstine
    Feb 19, 2017

    I loved

    and this is a stunning sequel.

    A year after Binti left home, watched her entire spaceship get massacred by Meduse, and became a hero by stopping an intergalactic war, she's immersed in her studies at Oomza Uni and friends with Okwu, one of the Meduse who murdered her fellow travellers.

    She's suffering from PTSD, and trying to make sense of her new life and identity. So she decides to travel home and make ame

    I loved

    and this is a stunning sequel.

    A year after Binti left home, watched her entire spaceship get massacred by Meduse, and became a hero by stopping an intergalactic war, she's immersed in her studies at Oomza Uni and friends with Okwu, one of the Meduse who murdered her fellow travellers.

    She's suffering from PTSD, and trying to make sense of her new life and identity. So she decides to travel home and make amends to her family as well as participate in her people's pilgrimage, hoping it might clear her head and heart.

    She feels alienated, and not just because she's been infused with Meduse DNA, but because she's the first of her people to travel into space to study, because she defied the expectations of her family and her people. She's not sure where she belongs anymore.

    So her and Okwu travel to earth. Okwu is the first of its species to ever come to earth in peace, and Binti? She just hopes her family will forgive her for running away and following her dreams.

    Neither

    or

    are particularly action-packed. It's a series that's focused on character progression, on Binti's journey towards her destiny. And

    lives up to the many connotations of its title.

    Binti comes home, but finds it is much different from how she left it, and that she, too, is much different. It turns out the change that is looming over her has just begun, and she might find herself even further removed from her family by the end of it.

    Binti continues her journey, and discovers strange, unnerving parts of her own heritage - and the part she may still have to play in the grander scheme of things.

    And it goes deeper into the violence of prejudice. How culture is what binds us together, but does so by also creating an "us" and a "them" and that bridging that gap may cost more than she is truly willing to pay.

    I'm honestly still just blown completely away by the amount if story Nnedi Okorafor manages to pack into so few pages. This doesn't feel like a 160 page novel, it feels like it's 300 hundred with the amount of feeling, world-building and exposition it gives us.

    It feels a little like an interlude (a finely crafted, immensely important interlude - a sort of calm before the storm) to the third and final book,

    . And I cannot wait to see where she takes us.

    Every single time I read an Okorafor book I'm left with a feeling of wonder and excitement. I'm continuously impressed with the scope of her vision and her unwavering courage to carry it out with such precision and style.

    Long story short, I love this fucking series and I cannot wait for the final book.