Curtain of Death

Curtain of Death

From #1 "New York Times" bestselling author W. E. B. Griffin comes the dramatic third novel in the Clandestine Operations series about the Cold War, the fledgling Central Intelligence Agency and a new breed of warrior. January 1946: Two WACs leave an officers club in Munich, and four Soviet NKGB agents kidnap them at knifepoint in the parking lot and shove them in the bac...

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Title:Curtain of Death
Author:W.E.B. Griffin
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:480 pages

Curtain of Death Reviews

  • Brian
    Feb 11, 2017

    A good sequel on the transition from Nazi Germany to the Cold War Russia and how the spy game evolved from a military exercise to shadowy environs of today. The characters are well developed and the attitude of the military toward the creation of the DIC has been well plotted against the backstory. The author does a good job of capturing the dialogue of men which had been harsh, raunchy, and very direct.

  • Abibliofob
    Feb 12, 2017

    Great work of fiction, one of my absolute favorite authors. This one is set in Germany in 1946 and the main character Capain James Cronley is the chief Europe of DCI the organisation that Truman were responsible for. DCI was what OSS were during the war and what later evolved into CIA. As usual Griffin tells a tale of great insight and much humor and I must sadly say that all his books are far to short. I strongly recommend his work and hope there will be many more books to come.

  • Mysterytribune
    Jan 09, 2017

    While we liked this story and think the character of Cronley is somewhat entertaining for W.E.B Griffin fans, The portrayal of the main character is less believable as a historical spy figure. Few peer critics noted out to us that the activities portrayed in the plot don’t necessary mirror that of a real spy operation at the time and the counterintelligence officers do not run around blabbing secret information to everybody they meet, as Jim Cronley seems to do on a regular basis.

    Having said tha

    While we liked this story and think the character of Cronley is somewhat entertaining for W.E.B Griffin fans, The portrayal of the main character is less believable as a historical spy figure. Few peer critics noted out to us that the activities portrayed in the plot don’t necessary mirror that of a real spy operation at the time and the counterintelligence officers do not run around blabbing secret information to everybody they meet, as Jim Cronley seems to do on a regular basis.

    Having said that, this is book which is engaging, easy to read and intriguing although a bit predictable in terms of the plot. Overall, this book is an entertaining read for historical thriller fans and Griffin loyalists.

  • Ken Boardman
    Jan 11, 2017

    I have to admit I did finish this book. I have read all of the Griffin novels over the years and have generally found them entertaining and fun. They are now to the point that so much time is spent giving background on previous characters and plots that there is little left new to read. If you are a first time reader of Griffin go back to his first army novels and read through them and skip this one. If you are a long time reader, this could be a comfortable evening or two of mindless entertainm

    I have to admit I did finish this book. I have read all of the Griffin novels over the years and have generally found them entertaining and fun. They are now to the point that so much time is spent giving background on previous characters and plots that there is little left new to read. If you are a first time reader of Griffin go back to his first army novels and read through them and skip this one. If you are a long time reader, this could be a comfortable evening or two of mindless entertainment.

  • Tom
    Jan 19, 2017

    Much as I generally like Griffin/Buttersworth's post-WWII Cold War pot boilers, this one (while still including some familiar faces) is a bit turgid and far-fetched. Ah well, no one ever said I once read comic books for the great literature!

  • Chris
    Jan 22, 2017

    I am really enjoying this series because of how it continues on the stories from South America, and because it tells the history of a time period that is forgotten. There is lots of history of WWII, but it ends at the end of the war, and doesn't continue into the beginning of the cold war.

  • Tom Tischler
    Jan 30, 2017

    It's January 1946 and two WAC'S leave an officer's club in Munich, Germany and are

    abducted in the parking lot by four NKGB agents. They are forced into the back of an

    ambulance but one of the WAC's works her hands loose and has a small revolver in her

    bra. Her name is Claudette Colbert and she shoots all four of the abductors killing 3 and

    wounding one in the shoulder. This incident sends shock waves up and down the line and has

    major repercussions not only for her but also her boss Captain James

    It's January 1946 and two WAC'S leave an officer's club in Munich, Germany and are

    abducted in the parking lot by four NKGB agents. They are forced into the back of an

    ambulance but one of the WAC's works her hands loose and has a small revolver in her

    bra. Her name is Claudette Colbert and she shoots all four of the abductors killing 3 and

    wounding one in the shoulder. This incident sends shock waves up and down the line and has

    major repercussions not only for her but also her boss Captain James Cronley who is the new

    DCI-Europe appointed by the President. This means that although he is only a Captain he

    can tell Colonels and Generals what to do. Now I know this book is fiction and I am not an

    authority but I did spend 8 years in the Marines and this sounds like something ordered by

    Trump. No matter who ordered it I can't see higher ranking officers allowing this to happen.

    This is book 3 in the Clandestine Operations Series. The book isn't really bad but it is long

    and boring. I gave it a 3.

  • Bill
    Feb 02, 2017

    Of all the books he/they have written, this was the slowest. Not only did it have very little action compared to most of their other books, but it spent much too much time rehashing all of the history of previous books.

    While I'm sure the plan was to make this a standalone book, almost anyone who reads a series knows that if they are picking up book 3, they have missed a lot and probably should read book 1 first.

    That said, you almost need an organizational chart to keep track of all of the player

    Of all the books he/they have written, this was the slowest. Not only did it have very little action compared to most of their other books, but it spent much too much time rehashing all of the history of previous books.

    While I'm sure the plan was to make this a standalone book, almost anyone who reads a series knows that if they are picking up book 3, they have missed a lot and probably should read book 1 first.

    That said, you almost need an organizational chart to keep track of all of the players and their relationships to each other.

    I suggest in the future they give a brief synopsis of what has transpired and move on. It got really tired when they repeated the same historical explanation of who somebody is and what they did because a second person wanted to know.

  • Nancy Shirk
    Feb 10, 2017

    This book ended in the usual exciting fashion.

    The beginning was so slow and the alphabet soup of military terms were tedious. It was disappointing after the previous books. I do like the characters in the series and the methods they use to achieve their goals without another war.

  • David Healey
    Feb 17, 2017

    The opening pages of Curtain of Death: A Clandestine Operations Novel by W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV have a great hook: two WACs leave a club in Germany and are promptly abducted by some sketchy thugs. Are they Germans? Russians?

    From this opening scene, a secret investigation begins into who these men were, and what their motivation was for trying to abduct the women—who are actually U.S. agents.

    In addition to a lot of suspense, there are several things that you can always coun

    The opening pages of Curtain of Death: A Clandestine Operations Novel by W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV have a great hook: two WACs leave a club in Germany and are promptly abducted by some sketchy thugs. Are they Germans? Russians?

    From this opening scene, a secret investigation begins into who these men were, and what their motivation was for trying to abduct the women—who are actually U.S. agents.

    In addition to a lot of suspense, there are several things that you can always count on in a W.E.B. Griffin novel. The first is that there is going to be a sense of humor that lightens up what could be a very dark story about violence and espionage. You can count on there being sexist objectification and dialogue right out of the 1940s. Finally, there are going to be a lot of military acronyms and jargon and rank pulling—which is a lot of fun because it takes some dedication to unravel all of the terms, so that the dedicated reader begins to feel like part of a club … an experience not unlike reading a Patrick O’Brian novel with its ballast of nautical terms.

    This is a whopper of a novel in length, but it is also a page turner with short sentences and snappy dialogue.

    The title refers, of course, to the “Iron Curtain” so famously named by Winston Churchill. In the confusion of post-war Germany, the victorious American forces find themselves facing a whole new enemy. Curtain of Death won’t disappoint with its intrigue, acronyms, and glimpses into the earliest days of the Cold War.