A Note Yet Unsung

A Note Yet Unsung

Despite her training as a master violinist, Rebekah Carrington was denied entry into the Nashville Philharmonic by young conductor Nathaniel Whitcomb, who bowed to public opinion. Now, with a reluctant muse and a recurring pain in his head, he needs her help to finish his symphony. But how can he win back her trust when he's robbed her of her dream?...

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Title:A Note Yet Unsung
Author:Tamera Alexander
Rating:
ISBN:0764206249
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:448 pages

A Note Yet Unsung Reviews

  • Staci
    Feb 07, 2017

    A lovely conclusion to the Belmont Masion Series. I love how the author used three of Adelicia Acklen's favorite things: art, nature and music as the motivation behind each book in the series.

    In 1871 Nashville it wasn't acceptable for a female to be part of a symphony. And yet, this is exactly the heart's desire of Rebekah Carrington. Initially, the local symphony's maestro, Tate Whitcomb is not kind to her or the idea of a female musician on stage.

    Both Rebekah and Tate have difficult circumstan

    A lovely conclusion to the Belmont Masion Series. I love how the author used three of Adelicia Acklen's favorite things: art, nature and music as the motivation behind each book in the series.

    In 1871 Nashville it wasn't acceptable for a female to be part of a symphony. And yet, this is exactly the heart's desire of Rebekah Carrington. Initially, the local symphony's maestro, Tate Whitcomb is not kind to her or the idea of a female musician on stage.

    Both Rebekah and Tate have difficult circumstances surrounding them that add depth to the novel. While the novel isn't awash in history, the author does a nice job of helping the reader feel the time period and geography.

    The entire Belmont Mansion Series is wonderful.

  • Loraine
    Mar 04, 2017

    Despite her training as a master violinist, Rebekah Carrington was denied entry into the Nashville Philharmonic by young conductor Nathaniel Whitcomb, who bowed to public opinion. Now, with a reluctant muse and a recurring pain in his head, he needs her help to finish his symphony. But how can he win back her trust when he's robbed her of her dream?

    This was my absolute favorite in the 3 book Belmont Mansion series, and had such a wow factor that it made my 2017 favorites list. The combination of

    Despite her training as a master violinist, Rebekah Carrington was denied entry into the Nashville Philharmonic by young conductor Nathaniel Whitcomb, who bowed to public opinion. Now, with a reluctant muse and a recurring pain in his head, he needs her help to finish his symphony. But how can he win back her trust when he's robbed her of her dream?

    This was my absolute favorite in the 3 book Belmont Mansion series, and had such a wow factor that it made my 2017 favorites list. The combination of symphonic music, the music of the hills of Tennessee, and old fashioned hymns really resonated with me. Tate and Rebekah both were affected by difficult circumstances, yet they never gave up on their faith or their love for music.

    My favorite part of the entire book was Rebekah's first visit to Tate's home. The love, support and closeness of Tate's family, the sharing of their simple pleasures in music and food, and their strong faith was so tender and sweet. The poem the grandfather wrote will be one I will copy and hold on to forever.

    One of Tamera Alexander's best! I highly recommend this entire series and have to say she left the best for last.

    Favorite Quotes: "But you must trust that the Lord has your best interest at the center of His heart, and whatever His plans are for your life, for this talent He has given you, He will bring them to fruition in time."

    "Seek His desires..above all, no matter what you will have to surrender. And you WILL have to surrender. We all do. It's part of the soul's refinement. ....Then when we surrender...or when He takes something from us, His motivation always stems from love."

  • Laura
    Mar 05, 2017

    Sometimes, the most enjoyed and appreciated books are the hardest ones to write a review for. Its kind of like viewing a spectacular mountain range, and you take a picture of its awesomeness, yet the picture just doesn't capture the authentic beauty of it. In a similar essence, I lack the ability to fully describe the beauty of Tamera's books when I finish one of her novels. A Note Yet Unsung was written with heart. It caused my emotions to soar with the musical quality of writing. I wish I coul

    Sometimes, the most enjoyed and appreciated books are the hardest ones to write a review for. Its kind of like viewing a spectacular mountain range, and you take a picture of its awesomeness, yet the picture just doesn't capture the authentic beauty of it. In a similar essence, I lack the ability to fully describe the beauty of Tamera's books when I finish one of her novels. A Note Yet Unsung was written with heart. It caused my emotions to soar with the musical quality of writing. I wish I could thank Tamera Alexander in person, and tell her how gifted of a writer she really is and how proud I am of her for fully using her gift to edify and glorify God with her words.

    My only negative comment, which could also be read as a compliment, is that I wish her stories where at least another 100 pages. Unfortunately, I know the majority of readers are always looking for less pages, quicker reads, but Alexander has a quality to her writing that not many authors can do well, and that is... penning a novel that could easily cruise into the 600 and 700 pages range with never a moment of dullness. I crave to read more of her characters, to have her stories even more fully fledged out.

    Other than applauding and yelling, "Bravissimo!" I cant fully review the splendor of this inspiring novel. Read it. You will be blessed.

  • Cara Putman
    Mar 04, 2017

    Tamera writes amazing southern fiction set in Nashville in the Reconstruction years. In A Note Yet Unsung, Rebekah is a professional violinist in an era that doesn't allow women to do such scandalous things like perform with an orchestra. She's a woman who doesn't fit and can't got home. But she can't leave either. This book will suck you into the time period, the setting, and a story that won't let go. This book has a depth to the challenges facing the characters that adds such richness to the

    Tamera writes amazing southern fiction set in Nashville in the Reconstruction years. In A Note Yet Unsung, Rebekah is a professional violinist in an era that doesn't allow women to do such scandalous things like perform with an orchestra. She's a woman who doesn't fit and can't got home. But she can't leave either. This book will suck you into the time period, the setting, and a story that won't let go. This book has a depth to the challenges facing the characters that adds such richness to the story. I will thinking about this book for weeks if not months to come.

  • Beth Erin
    Feb 07, 2017

    Full review on Faithfully Bookish

    Music lover or not, A Note Unsung will capture your heart, reader friends because the story is about much more than the wonderful music! Reconstruction Era Nashville, as well as the struggles and triumphs of her residents, is brought to life once again by talented storyteller and bonafide southern belle, Tamera Alexander. The tenacious dreams and complex lives of the main characters will keep readers riveted to the pages.

    I requested the opp

    Full review on Faithfully Bookish

    Music lover or not, A Note Unsung will capture your heart, reader friends because the story is about much more than the wonderful music! Reconstruction Era Nashville, as well as the struggles and triumphs of her residents, is brought to life once again by talented storyteller and bonafide southern belle, Tamera Alexander. The tenacious dreams and complex lives of the main characters will keep readers riveted to the pages.

    I requested the opportunity to read and review this title through NetGalley. The opinions expressed are my own.

  • Nenia Campbell
    Jan 02, 2017

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    I read this book for the

    ' New Years 2017 Reading Challenge. For more info about what this is,

    .

    Most readers tend to get into a loop; they know what genres they typically like, and what genres they typically

    like, and then they go out and pursue books that are in the category of the former, while actively (or subconsciously) avoiding the latter. Even though I'm a late starter to the romance genre,

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    I read this book for the

    ' New Years 2017 Reading Challenge. For more info about what this is,

    .

    Most readers tend to get into a loop; they know what genres they typically like, and what genres they typically

    like, and then they go out and pursue books that are in the category of the former, while actively (or subconsciously) avoiding the latter. Even though I'm a late starter to the romance genre, I've quickly learned that there are many, many subgenres in romance, and some of them tend to repel me more than others. Case in point: christian fiction.

    I wanted to choose a good book for the 2017 Reading Challenge in my romance group, because christian fiction can be a mixed bag. I've read a handful of christian historical fiction that I actually liked quite a bit, my favorite being TIFFANY GIRL by Deeane Gist, because of its feminist themes and amusing love story, but as a non-religious person, some of them just feel so "preachy," judgmental, and even borderline-misogynistic. I realize it's unfair to judge an entire genre by its duds - especially in a genre that doesn't have me in mind as an audience - but man, when christian romance gets it wrong, it gets it

    . Would my choice for the christian fiction category, A NOTE YET UNSUNG, get it right?

    A NOTE YET UNSUNG actually has several wonderful/interesting/cool qualities that set it apart from other romances. One, that cover is gorgeous. And I loved the fact that she was holding a violin in the middle of a concert hall. She's a musician! That was what drew me in, because I have a history in music, and the idea of reading about a heroine who desperately wants to be a musician in an age when it was considered illicit for women to do so was incredibly intriguing.

    Two, while this is the third book in a trilogy, it appears that they're an interconnected set of standalones revolving around a

    person in history,

    , plantation-owner and mansion-owner who was, at one point, the richest woman in Tennessee.

    Three, this romance novel actually has some prevailing feminist themes. Rebekah, the heroine, wants to be a musician and is unwilling to let men - or society - tell her "no." She's actually quite sneaky and enterprising in how she goes about advancing herself, and is willing to settle for a less prestigious position in order to do or be around while she loves, all the while plotting how to advance herself.

    Religion is present in this book, but it isn't used to judge; instead, it is used for comfort in times of need, or to meditate on one's desires and pray for what one desires - either for oneself or one's loved ones. I didn't mind this at all, and thought it added, rather than detracted to the story, and I enjoyed the use of religious music in this story to show how it can bond people together.

    The reason this book isn't getting a higher rating is because of the love story, pointless drawn-out scenes with the hero's family, and some questionable actions on the hero and heroine's part.

    The hero and heroine disliked each other at first. He starts liking her first, and when she likes him it feels so sudden! He also treated her quite badly at points, and while there are reasons to explain his bursts of anger and irritation later on, which do make sense, it was still annoying.

    I also could have done without the long interludes spent with Tate's family. I didn't think they added to the story, except to make Rebekah look like a good person that was meant to be with Tate, and since the rest of the book was leading to that conclusion anyway I feel like it could have been cut out to reduce the page count and make the book a little breezier. I almost marked this book as "DNF" because the middle bogged down so much, but it picked up as soon as they left Casa Tate.

    Finally, the questionable actions. At one point, due to a misunderstanding where the spying heroine finds some laudanum bottles, she assumes that he's taking them to an opium den to get high. Since he is a conductor (and she, his assistant), she decides

    and then lecture him about how he's ruining his career and - more importantly - her own. It turns out that he isn't going to an opium den, though; the laudanum is for a terminally sick family member. Oops.The way Tate reacts to this is weird; he forgives her, and hardly gets angry at all, which isn't in line with his temperamental character. Me, I'd be furious if someone pulled that crap with me. Who does that??

    There's also an abuse subplot in here with an evil stepfather stereotype, and that was also kind of awkwardly handled. He's creepy AF, though, so kudos for writing him as unambiguously the bad guy as possible, I guess. Others might be put off by the "happy black servant" stereotypes, done in the style of GONE WITH THE WIND, and the fact that the N-word is used, seemingly for shock value, by the bad guy to cement what we already know: that he is, in fact, the bad guy. This was an interesting contrast to me, because right now I'm reading Octavia Butler's KINDRED, a book that's also set in the 19th-C South, except it's brutal in highlighting injustice and the treatment of black men and women. The main character herself actually mocks the way black slaves are portrayed in books like GONE WITH THE WIND, as being a very sugarcoated, rose-tinted way of looking at the past.

    Adelicia Cheatham's character was the bomb, though; many of the best lines were hers (I've quoted a couple in my status updates for this book if you want to look). And honestly, Rebekah's character was okay, even if she could be incredibly annoying at times. I'm glad I read this book because it was in a genre that I don't normally read (and even sometimes avoid), and it was good enough that I'd check out other publications by this publisher.

    Thanks to Netgalley/the publisher for the review copy!

    2.5 stars!

  • Alexis Tucker
    Jan 04, 2017

    There are so many ways that I could go with this review, but I'm just going to be completely up front and honest. I cried with this book. You made me cry, Tamera Alexander. It was so breathtaking. The rhythm of it all flowed together to produce a beautiful, symphonic harmony.

    Every book I've ever read by Tamera Alexander has held me completely spellbound; A Note Yet Unsung was no different.

    Rebekah Carrington was sent abroad at a very tender age. Her grandmother sent her away so that she could es

    There are so many ways that I could go with this review, but I'm just going to be completely up front and honest. I cried with this book. You made me cry, Tamera Alexander. It was so breathtaking. The rhythm of it all flowed together to produce a beautiful, symphonic harmony.

    Every book I've ever read by Tamera Alexander has held me completely spellbound; A Note Yet Unsung was no different.

    Rebekah Carrington was sent abroad at a very tender age. Her grandmother sent her away so that she could escape her abusive step-father. Rebekah comes home at her mother's insistence when her grandmother dies. Rebekah decides she cannot live in the house with her stepfather and attempts to secure a job with the symphony. She is refused, because she is a woman.

    The Maestro is not what she expected at all, and as life would have it she is found to be working closely with him.

    I'm not going to ruin the story for anyone, because I loved it so much. This is definitely one of those books that you could read over and over again and it would get better each time you read it.

    A Note Yet Unsung is about finding out who your true friends are, being loyal, and taking chances.

    I would recommend this book to anyone! Just don't get it and expect to be a quick read. It was something that I couldn't put down, it was that good. It didn't have explicit content, or any cringe moments.

    The cover is also exquisite. It makes you want to just delve right into the story.

    Five star review for this masterpiece. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

    I was given a copy of this book by NetGalley for a complete and honest review

  • Mary
    Feb 28, 2017

    WOW. This book was SO good! When I started reading it, I wasn't entirely in the mood for it. However, once I got past the first 60 pages or so, I was so immersed in the story that it was painful to put the book down.

    Since lists are so much fun, let's go ahead and divide my thoughts into a list, shall we?

    // Look, somebody has to say it...TATEEEEE. Oh my goodness, Tate Whitcomb was by far the best part of the book! I absolutely fell in love with him. <3 He can be short-tempered a

    WOW. This book was SO good! When I started reading it, I wasn't entirely in the mood for it. However, once I got past the first 60 pages or so, I was so immersed in the story that it was painful to put the book down.

    Since lists are so much fun, let's go ahead and divide my thoughts into a list, shall we?

    // Look, somebody has to say it...TATEEEEE. Oh my goodness, Tate Whitcomb was by far the best part of the book! I absolutely fell in love with him. <3 He can be short-tempered and irritable at times, but he's really a great guy overall. He just has a lot of problems weighing on his mind, including composing an ENTIRE symphony, dealing with the stresses of being the new, young conductor of an orchestra, and lots of personal issues (which shall not be named because spoilers). POOR THING. I just want to hug him throughout the entire book. Because the way he treats Rebekah?? Suffice it to say, the two of them are darling together. I just love how sweet he is with her (um, most of the time...hehe).

    // Tate's family was wonderful. I just loved his family so much! It was amusing seeing how adorably awkward Tate was when introducing them to Rebekah. XD And the genuine love they had for each other is just so heartwarming.

    // All the violin and music-related stuff! I'm a violinist myself so I really appreciated all the music in this book. Rebekah and Tate both play the violin, and I love that. I'm not sure if non-musicians would enjoy it as much? Maybe it just appeals to me because I deal with music all the time anyway. But yes, all the music was splendid! (And I love that the author actually has a playlist of all the songs mentioned in the book on her website. :D)

    // The setting! I really liked the "refined southern feel" of this book. It takes place in Nashville in 1871, where there are mansions and concert halls and even donut shops (where Tate takes Rebekah <3). It has a very charming feel to it overall. ^_^

    // The writing style was so gorgeous! I positively adored Tamera Alexander's writing style! Too often the writer is either too descriptive or not descriptive enough. But this author struck the perfect balance. The writing was rich and evocative, yet engaging enough that I didn't get sucked into a black hole of descriptions. (That has happened before. XD)

    // Rebekah. I can't believe I haven't mentioned her yet! She was SUCH a great character! It's not often that I find myself rooting for both main characters so much. She was a good blend of gentle and sassy. I loved her determination and strong will, combined with a gentleness of spirit. I think that female characters often end up on either side of the spectrum, which aggravates me. But Rebekah broke the mold, being an independent young woman who still knew how to be a lady.

    TATE AND REBEKAH. Have I conveyed how much I love them??? EEP. They were the most darling couple! You don't know how much I wanted them to just GET TOGETHER. (I'm not telling you if it happens or not...you'll have to read the book to find out. ;))

    // Alllll the cookies and donuts and cakes. YUM.

    // THE ENDING. The last few chapters were so darn good. I cried happy tears during one scene. :')

    Oh, and I almost forgot to mention this! I loved that Tate and Rebekah's relationship was not based on physical attraction so much. Sure, looks had a part to play in it, but I appreciated that they each wanted the other person to achieve their goals. They were genuinely attracted to their personalities and character, rather than just their physical appearance.

    // Some of the dialect got a little old...there's only so much of that I can take in a book.

    // Not enough time in the donut shop. Yes, this is a legitimate concern. XD

    // I honestly can't think of much else. It was a really wonderful book!

    Overall, I LOVED this book! Even though it was the third book in the series, I didn't at all feel disconnected or confused. The series is written in such a way that it seems reading them out of order works fine. That being said, I enjoyed this book so much that I just have to read the other ones now. :)

    And content-wise, it was very clean! There were a couple kisses exchanged, and I believe one or two of them may have been described more than some people would like. But I thought most of them were sweet. Rebekah's stepfather clearly has...ahem, a thing for Rebekah. It's not dwelt on very much, but yes, it's worth mentioning for sensitive readers. I definitely would recommend it to older teens, probably fourteen and fifteen on up.

  • Amy
    Jan 30, 2017

    Grr!!!! This book was SOOOOO close to being an amazing, 5-star read!!! I was completely swept away until the final chapters, when the sumptuous storytelling I'd been blissfully lost in for hours suddenly leapt forward at a frantic gallop to bring the book -- and the series -- to a close... with half the plot too rushed, and the other half left too vague. I wanted to see more! I needed just a few more answers! I also found the character of Billy rather pointless, but then I also did not read the

    Grr!!!! This book was SOOOOO close to being an amazing, 5-star read!!! I was completely swept away until the final chapters, when the sumptuous storytelling I'd been blissfully lost in for hours suddenly leapt forward at a frantic gallop to bring the book -- and the series -- to a close... with half the plot too rushed, and the other half left too vague. I wanted to see more! I needed just a few more answers! I also found the character of Billy rather pointless, but then I also did not read the previous book in the series, so perhaps there was some larger reason for his presence that I was simply unaware of. But on the whole, this book was a lavish, literary feast that belongs on every historical fiction lover's keeper shelf!

  • Emily
    Feb 23, 2017

    After living in Austria for several years, Rebekah Carrington returns home to Nashville. Desperate to find somewhere other than her family home, she auditions for the Nashville Philharmonic symphony only to be turned down because she is a woman. So Rebekah takes the best job she can find—tutoring the daughter of the owner of the Belmont Mansion, a notorious lover of music. Will she ever be able to achieve her dreams?

    A Note Yet Unsung by Tamera Alexander continues the line of questioning brought

    After living in Austria for several years, Rebekah Carrington returns home to Nashville. Desperate to find somewhere other than her family home, she auditions for the Nashville Philharmonic symphony only to be turned down because she is a woman. So Rebekah takes the best job she can find—tutoring the daughter of the owner of the Belmont Mansion, a notorious lover of music. Will she ever be able to achieve her dreams?

    A Note Yet Unsung by Tamera Alexander continues the line of questioning brought up in the other books in the series: If a woman has the skill to perform at a high level, shouldn’t she be allowed to do so? But the post-Civil War era is one that only begins to reluctantly open these opportunities to women. In addition to the social critique, the other main focus in this novel is the romance between Rebekah and the symphony conductor, Nathaniel Whitcomb. They start off with a rocky relationship that quickly shows them to be the perfect match. They have many hurdles to overcome, but it was lovely to watch them grow together. I wish there were a few more details about their relationship at the end of the book, but the romance was charming overall. The book contained a little danger and mystery which were solved satisfactorily. While this book was not my all-time favorite, I enjoyed it very much and have very few negative comments for it.

    I recommend A Note Yet Unsung to readers of inspirational romance and historical fiction.

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley and Bethany House Publisher’s Blogger Reviewer Program. All opinions are expressly my own.