Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, Book 2

Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, Book 2

Counting down the final days of the kingdom of Wakanda! As Zenzi and The People poison Wakanda’s citizens against the Black Panther, a cabal of nation-breakers is assembled. And Ayo and Aneka, the Midnight Angels, are courted to raise their land to new glory! His allies dwindling, T’Challa must rely on his elite secret police, the Hatut Zeraze, and fellow Avenger Eden Fesi...

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Title:Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, Book 2
Author:Ta-Nehisi Coates
Rating:
ISBN:1302900544
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:144 pages

Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet, Book 2 Reviews

  • shayne avec i grec
    Jan 02, 2017

    After such a strong start I am now convinced Ta-Nehisi Coates must be Panther King manifest. Whereas the initial chapters had me a little confused at moments from so much to take in and get caught up on, this arc drives forward in full swing with just a perfect dose of humor laced into its action and intrigue. I want more!

  • Owen
    Jan 11, 2017

    I read the individual issues when they came out and really enjoyed them, though I was slightly confused at the time. I am re-reading both this collection and the previous to see how well it all flows as a continuous story.

  • Ed
    Jan 15, 2017

    Coates starts to find his sea legs in this set of issues. #7 is particularly good; I think he'd do better on the Crew as a team book than Black Panther. Also his Hickman-isms really crank in issue 8.

  • Vendela
    Jan 21, 2017

    The four is legit only because I'm not a fan of the old Black Panther comic included in this. If you set that aside, this album is incredible.

  • Bogi Takács
    Jan 28, 2017

    The story was fine - I'd love to see more of basically everyone, which is a good sign. Voice is spot on, Wakandans read like Wakandans (this was quite well established in the first volume), Americans read like Americans, etc.

    I really do prefer Stelfreeze to Sprouse on the art, though. Sprouse is fine, but his art has a slightly rigid feel to me. I also think that this title should be given to a Black artist.

    And again it's only 4 issues, with 2 bonus old (REALLY old) Black Panther issues that we

    The story was fine - I'd love to see more of basically everyone, which is a good sign. Voice is spot on, Wakandans read like Wakandans (this was quite well established in the first volume), Americans read like Americans, etc.

    I really do prefer Stelfreeze to Sprouse on the art, though. Sprouse is fine, but his art has a slightly rigid feel to me. I also think that this title should be given to a Black artist.

    And again it's only 4 issues, with 2 bonus old (REALLY old) Black Panther issues that were rather dreadful. I have the nagging feeling that Marvel is trying to cash in on buyers who don't usually read comics and don't really know how much material goes into a regular TPB.

    It was fascinating to see first-draft script pages, though. I am happy with *that* kind of extra material.

    Source of the book: Lawrence Public Library (thank you!)

  • Alan
    Jan 30, 2017

    Yeah, I'm cheating I'm doing the reviews for the floppies under the TPB.

    The main reason I keep trudging through this book every month is because Coates is an award winning author. But, I don't think Coates has caught onto the difference between writing essays, books, and a monthly comic.

    A writer can get away with a slow build in a novel, but with a monthly comic you need to give that reader a reason to come in every month. The story needs to move at a different pace than a Stephen King or George

    Yeah, I'm cheating I'm doing the reviews for the floppies under the TPB.

    The main reason I keep trudging through this book every month is because Coates is an award winning author. But, I don't think Coates has caught onto the difference between writing essays, books, and a monthly comic.

    A writer can get away with a slow build in a novel, but with a monthly comic you need to give that reader a reason to come in every month. The story needs to move at a different pace than a Stephen King or George R.R. Martin book.

    And, Coates really hasn't figured that out yet. I've been sticking with this out of stubbornness, not intelligence. I keep hoping to see a country that intrigues me, a T'Challa who grabs my attention. A weak T'Challa doesn't work for me (also points a finger at Reggie Hudlin and Jon Mayberry who took earlier turns with the character).

    A year in and arguably nothing has happened. I'm not engaged in the romantic relationships, or the rebellion. I'll give it a couple of more months for Coates to convince me he has some writing chops and is not an over-hyped mainstream writer trying his hand at comics (and in part was hired on political correctness grounds).

  • Ken Moten
    Jan 31, 2017

    This book is the second trade paperback of

    '

    and finally everything is starting to click in the right direction creatively. We find T'Challa on the back foot as the rebellion against him on two-fronts is no longer manageable by him-alone. He makes a further bad gamble that his enemies capitalize on and use to further undermine his legitamcy with the Wakandan people. Luckily, being an Avenger has its perks. At the same time, th

    This book is the second trade paperback of

    '

    and finally everything is starting to click in the right direction creatively. We find T'Challa on the back foot as the rebellion against him on two-fronts is no longer manageable by him-alone. He makes a further bad gamble that his enemies capitalize on and use to further undermine his legitamcy with the Wakandan people. Luckily, being an Avenger has its perks. At the same time, the comatose Shuri is finally starting to make her way back to the land of the living and she is coming back much more prepared than she was before.

    The Dora Milage have established their own state north of Wakanda's Captial while the main antagonists are marching on the Golden City from the south.

    , but this time it seems the damage will be much more permanent.

    I was sad to see

    come off of official art duties, but I was very happy to see how well Coates' prose had developed since the previous volume. The borrowing from history (mainly the

    ), hip-hop, and, of course,

    I am very excited to see how this will all end.

  • Derek Newman-Stille
    Feb 01, 2017

    Another powerful narrative by Ta-Nehisi Coates that explores the complexity of the Black Panther and ideas of kingship, citizenship, and critical belonging. Coates opens up critical questions about revolution and belonging, nationhood and resistance, proposing a rethinking of the notion of nationality itself.

    Coates' Black Panther is a character who is caught between multiple identities and roles that he has to perform from the super heroic to the role of king and his own emotional depth as a pe

    Another powerful narrative by Ta-Nehisi Coates that explores the complexity of the Black Panther and ideas of kingship, citizenship, and critical belonging. Coates opens up critical questions about revolution and belonging, nationhood and resistance, proposing a rethinking of the notion of nationality itself.

    Coates' Black Panther is a character who is caught between multiple identities and roles that he has to perform from the super heroic to the role of king and his own emotional depth as a person with others who rely on him. He is a figure who exudes power but must constantly question his power and explore the influence he has over his citizens.

    Yet, this is also a narrative that explores the roots of power with the people, with the populace who confers power on their leaders. Coates explores power from the citizenry but also from the spiritual realm, examining the way that spirits teach and change those who encounter them, inviting the powerful to remember that their rule comes from the land and from the people who live on that land.

    As much a philosophical discourse as it is a superhero comic, Coates' Black Panther comic illustrates the power of narratives (whether they are folk stories told to people or whether they are comics that are themselves a different kind of folk story) to change people and invite questions.

  • Maggie
    Feb 08, 2017

    SO GOOD. I've never read such a well-written graphic, it's like I'm reading a richly dialogue-laden novel with beautiful artwork serving as the supporting storyteller (which, now that I think on it, is how all graphics should be). I skipped the Black Panther throwback snippets after the story ended because I heard they were terrible (and the artwork was just so outdated, it was a huge turn off... I assumed the text would feel the same). I kind of wish I'd waited for this to be released as a comp

    SO GOOD. I've never read such a well-written graphic, it's like I'm reading a richly dialogue-laden novel with beautiful artwork serving as the supporting storyteller (which, now that I think on it, is how all graphics should be). I skipped the Black Panther throwback snippets after the story ended because I heard they were terrible (and the artwork was just so outdated, it was a huge turn off... I assumed the text would feel the same). I kind of wish I'd waited for this to be released as a compendium, it deserves to be fully absorbed all at once.

  • Alex Sarll
    Feb 14, 2017

    A much more satisfying experience than the first volume, in which Coates seems to be settling in to the subtly different art of writing comics rather than prose, and the story feels like it's meshing much better with Wakanda as previously seen. Though for once, the old issues stuffed in the back to fill out a slender collection really help with that: I'd never read any of

    before, but if that was Coates' formative vision of the character where mine was the Priest run, then no wonde

    A much more satisfying experience than the first volume, in which Coates seems to be settling in to the subtly different art of writing comics rather than prose, and the story feels like it's meshing much better with Wakanda as previously seen. Though for once, the old issues stuffed in the back to fill out a slender collection really help with that: I'd never read any of

    before, but if that was Coates' formative vision of the character where mine was the Priest run, then no wonder I'm a little at cross purposes with his take. A mention is also needed for Stelfreeze's work, of course, not least the wonderful faces he supplies in scenes where a complex emotional transition hinges entirely on the acting.