Police at the Station and They Don't Look Friendly

Police at the Station and They Don't Look Friendly

Belfast 1988: A man is found dead, killed with a bolt from a crossbow in front of his house. This is no hunting accident. But uncovering who is responsible for the murder will take Detective Sean Duffy down his most dangerous road yet, a road that leads to a lonely clearing on a high bog where three masked gunmen will force Duffy to dig his own grave. Hunted by forces unkn...

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Title:Police at the Station and They Don't Look Friendly
Author:Adrian McKinty
Rating:
ISBN:1633882594
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:320 pages

Police at the Station and They Don't Look Friendly Reviews

  • Cphe
    Jan 07, 2017

    The sixth offering in the Sean Duffy series and as usual a convoluted police procedural. Kudos to the author for maintaining such a high standard throughout the series overall.

    In this novel we see an older and wiser Sean Duffy, he's the father of a baby girl and looking to the future but events as readers have come to expect with Duffy never run to plan.

    Duffy is still stepping on toes, cynical, dogged, determined to bring the culprits to justice at any cost. He still has a sense of humour and is

    The sixth offering in the Sean Duffy series and as usual a convoluted police procedural. Kudos to the author for maintaining such a high standard throughout the series overall.

    In this novel we see an older and wiser Sean Duffy, he's the father of a baby girl and looking to the future but events as readers have come to expect with Duffy never run to plan.

    Duffy is still stepping on toes, cynical, dogged, determined to bring the culprits to justice at any cost. He still has a sense of humour and is a master of the "one liners."

    In this novel there is more about Duffy the "family" man and we do see him going in a different direction by the end of the novel. Fifteen years on the job has taken it's toll and he now has responsibilities.

    The secondary characters are well developed from the unflappable McCrabben to the younger and politically correct, Lawson.

    I love this series, from the quirky eye-catching titles to the main character Sean Duffy. As you can see I'm a tad biased......

  • Aoife62
    Nov 08, 2016

    Duffy is getting better and better.

    Adrian McKinty is my favorite crime fiction author and he did not fail my high expectations on this 6th novel in the Sean Duffy series.

    We get a bit of family background of Duffy in this book which nicely rounds off the picture and adds colour. He is no longer only a renegade, a chain-smoking, drinking and drug-abusing while brilliant and dedicated cop, but has developed into a husband (in all but name) and a father - "Duffy, who has Swedish Vodka and listens to

    Duffy is getting better and better.

    Adrian McKinty is my favorite crime fiction author and he did not fail my high expectations on this 6th novel in the Sean Duffy series.

    We get a bit of family background of Duffy in this book which nicely rounds off the picture and adds colour. He is no longer only a renegade, a chain-smoking, drinking and drug-abusing while brilliant and dedicated cop, but has developed into a husband (in all but name) and a father - "Duffy, who has Swedish Vodka and listens to Estonian classical music" and who shows a streak of romantic in his descriptions of rural Antrim. All of Duffy's fans will agree that he deserves a bit of happiness.

    This books case starts unobtrusively with the quite ordinary murder of a drug dealer. Only the murder weapon is unusual - a crossbow. But soon the story develops into a bog of intrigues and dangerous hidden agendas.

    Developments within Carrick CID threaten to make Duffy's life more and more difficult, they literally "don't look friendly", to make matters even worse, family problems add to that, but Duffy finds support from unlikely sides.

    Here is what I love about Police at the station:

    - the hero: Duffy, with all his troubles and contradictions, you just have to like him, fear for him and wish that his luck never ever runs out!

    - the sidekicks: Crabbie and Lawson, these two and Duffy have become an awesome team!

    - the language: gripping and fast but also poetic, with an idiosyncratic sometimes telegraphic style, this is literature, far beyond and above suspense

    - the story: slow to start, building up suspense and hooking you until the last page - and even beyond. We get all the information needed to solve the case, but still the outcome always surprises and leaves me like "why haven't I seen this?"

    The setting and the atmosphere: Northern Ireland during the Troubles is an extraordinarily interesting place, and as always, Duffy's story is immersed and connected to temporary events. However, placing the story in this cold, rainy, politically instable place and period does not meen its atmosphere is depressing. There is lightness and humor to balance the darkness.

    Thanks a lot for this book, Adrian, please keep on, I definitely want to hear more from Duffy!

  • Sandy
    Nov 24, 2016

    Sean Duffy has spent the last 15 years as the token “fenian peeler” at the Carrickfergus RUC station. He may be hated by Catholics & Prods alike but the fact he’s still breathing has earned him a grudging respect.

     

    It’s 1988 & the Troubles have simmered down somewhat. So Sean & colleagues Lawson and Crabbie have more time to investigate “normal” crimes. Well…maybe that’s a bit optimistic. When they’re called to a rough neighbourhood, the last thing they expect to find is a man killed

    Sean Duffy has spent the last 15 years as the token “fenian peeler” at the Carrickfergus RUC station. He may be hated by Catholics & Prods alike but the fact he’s still breathing has earned him a grudging respect.

     

    It’s 1988 & the Troubles have simmered down somewhat. So Sean & colleagues Lawson and Crabbie have more time to investigate “normal” crimes. Well…maybe that’s a bit optimistic. When they’re called to a rough neighbourhood, the last thing they expect to find is a man killed with a crossbow. But before he can deal with the victim Sean has to subdue a crazy wife, an angry mob & a goat (don’t ask).

     

    The man is eventually identified as a drug dealer who recently moved back to N. Ireland. Should be a no-brainer. He was probably killed by a faction of the IRA or a business rival. Either way, the case is likely destined for the unsolved bin. But the choice of weapon bothers Sean & when the man’s wife disappears, his team begins some serious digging.

     

    The investigation is a welcome distraction for Sean. Things at the station are a little tense these days. An old nemesis is about to become boss & there’s a rumour they may have to actually pass a fitness test. On the home front, Beth wants to move house & her father would prefer that Sean stay behind. Jeeze….don’t they know he’s trying to quit smoking?

     

    Batten the hatches, people. This one takes off in directions you’ll never see coming. A simple murder soon escalates into an intricate web of death threats, old secrets & some seriously pissed off IRA enforcers. And that’s before an international incident reignites the Troubles.

     

    It has to be a challenge for any author writing a series to produce something fresh while staying true to their characters. McKinty accomplishes this by aging his cast in real time. As the books progress, we watch as they bump into all the milestones that make up a life. The result is we become deeply invested in characters who feel authentic. Sean is 38 now & worn down by the daily battle. He’s had a front row seat for more than a decade as his country tears itself apart. His cocky, self deprecating attitude is still intact but you sense he’s becoming resigned to a bleak future. One little ray of hope is baby Emma whose smile lights up his world but the fact her daddy is a marked man just adds to his stress.

     

    What hasn’t changed is sharp, witty dialogue that showcases the frequently hilarious vernacular of Northern Ireland. One moment you’re breathless from the hair raising action while the next has you giggling as Sean debates politics with his cat.

     

    Descriptions of Carrickfergus & its residents put you smack dab in the middle of this desperate time. It’s clear the author loves his home & knows its history. Actual people & events provide a tense background which adds to the dark atmosphere of the story.

     

    So consider yourself warned. Don’t pick this up until you have a few spare hours because the prologue is killer & you won’t want to stop. I’ve enjoyed every book in the series but this is one of the best.

  • Robert Intriago
    Feb 05, 2017

    I am sure glad that the author decided to extend the series beyond a trilogy. It must be difficult to decide the length of a series as some of them tend to get a bit long in the tooth. His previous series, in my opinion, was cut a little bit short and I would have liked for it to be continued. It is difficult at this time to determine whether the current series has run its course but I believe that the 6th rendition maybe his best. The story starts as a police procedural involving the murder of

    I am sure glad that the author decided to extend the series beyond a trilogy. It must be difficult to decide the length of a series as some of them tend to get a bit long in the tooth. His previous series, in my opinion, was cut a little bit short and I would have liked for it to be continued. It is difficult at this time to determine whether the current series has run its course but I believe that the 6th rendition maybe his best. The story starts as a police procedural involving the murder of a drug dealer. All indications point to an execution by a subsidiary of the IRA, but here are where the twists begin. The author introduces a lot of historical facts about the troubles in Northern Ireland in the 1980s with references to previous incidents. All the incidents are historically accurate and have the desired effect of spicing the story. All the requirements of Irish Noir are present in this rendition of the Duffy series including action, drinking, corruption and personal matters in the life of the protagonist.

  • Alan Taylor
    Jan 08, 2017

    Several years ago I chanced upon "Dead I Well May Be" by Adrian McKinty, a novel about a Belfast ex-pat, Michael Forsythe, becoming embroiled in New York gangland, a slice of violent noir, with wonderful dialogue, with the action punctuated with poetic, almost mystical passages. The book and the author quickly became favourites. I read the complete "Dead" trilogy and the rest of McKinty's work and, five years ago, began to follow his new trilogy set in 1980s Belfast. "The Cold, Cold Ground" intr

    Several years ago I chanced upon "Dead I Well May Be" by Adrian McKinty, a novel about a Belfast ex-pat, Michael Forsythe, becoming embroiled in New York gangland, a slice of violent noir, with wonderful dialogue, with the action punctuated with poetic, almost mystical passages. The book and the author quickly became favourites. I read the complete "Dead" trilogy and the rest of McKinty's work and, five years ago, began to follow his new trilogy set in 1980s Belfast. "The Cold, Cold Ground" introduced Sean Duffy, a Roman Catholic in a predominantly Protestant Royal Ulster Constabulary. The books are all five-star, the series uniformly excellent, McKinty one of the best crime-writers currently writing. But nothing has usurped "Dead I Well May Be" - until now...

    "Police at the Station...", the sixth in the Duffy trilogy (take that "Hitchhikers..."), may be the best novel Adrian McKinty has written to date and it deserves to be widely read. Duffy, a little older, perhaps slightly wiser, has undergone some life-altering changes since the end of the last novel and is struggling to get used to being a father and nearly-husband. Meanwhile somebody is murdering drug dealers with a crossbow.....

    As with McKinty's previous work, the story is filled with snappy, authentic dialogue and the investigation brings Duffy, and his loyal team, McCrabban and Lawson, into contact with real-life 'Troubles" in Belfast, in this case the terrible aftermath of the March 1988 SAS shooting of an IRA team in Gibraltar which led to rioting in Northern Ireland, Michael Stone's attack on the IRA funerals and the televised lynching of two British Army corporals. But, again as usual, there is also a lot of humour in the book as well as Duffy's love of literature and music - he is listening to a lot of 20th Century classical this time around and at one point memorably, and correctly, characterises the 1980s pop-music as “anodyne, conformist, radio-friendly bollocks, lacking in soul, grace, intelligence or joy.”

    Adrian McKinty is a literate and intelligent writer of clever and exciting crime thrillers and, despite being completely wrong about Denis Villeneuve's "Arrival" and putting the irritating "I'd of.." in Duffy's mouth twice in this novel, should be on any self-respecting crime fan's to-read list well ahead of any amount of Scandi-bollocks and James Patterson's weekly output.

  • Nick Brett
    Jan 06, 2017

    A strong edition in an excellent series set in late 80’s Belfast. DI Sean Duffy is investigating the murder of a man by crossbow, while his life and career seem to be falling apart.

    Obviously set in the time of the “Troubles” in Belfast, these were difficult times, the SAS have taken out an IRA team in Gibraltar and the tensions are high. Duffy feels he can walk the tightrope and investigate amongst a sea of distrust and racial bigotry. This is actually what makes these books so great, the tensio

    A strong edition in an excellent series set in late 80’s Belfast. DI Sean Duffy is investigating the murder of a man by crossbow, while his life and career seem to be falling apart.

    Obviously set in the time of the “Troubles” in Belfast, these were difficult times, the SAS have taken out an IRA team in Gibraltar and the tensions are high. Duffy feels he can walk the tightrope and investigate amongst a sea of distrust and racial bigotry. This is actually what makes these books so great, the tension and atmosphere of Northern Ireland in the 80’s, the culture and attitude of the Police and the characters that the author presents. The atmosphere comes off in waves and brings back memories of those terrible times as Duffy tries to duck and weave his way to survival.

    Very well put together and, in addition to historical accuracy and interest, a great crime novel.

  • Susan Johnson
    Jan 18, 2017

    I never thought I'd live to see the day that Sean Duffy would mellow but it's amazing what a baby can do to you. In the sixth book of this wonderful series, Duffy is now living with his girlfriend and daughter, Emma. People breaking into his house and shooting at him and his family just doesn't roll off his back the way it used to and he wants it to stop.

    As the token Catholic on the police force, Duffy still answers to his own moral code and doesn't ignore crimes when warned by his superiors t

    I never thought I'd live to see the day that Sean Duffy would mellow but it's amazing what a baby can do to you. In the sixth book of this wonderful series, Duffy is now living with his girlfriend and daughter, Emma. People breaking into his house and shooting at him and his family just doesn't roll off his back the way it used to and he wants it to stop.

    As the token Catholic on the police force, Duffy still answers to his own moral code and doesn't ignore crimes when warned by his superiors to do so. So when a heroin drug dealer is murdered by a cross bow, of all things, Duffy actually investigates the case. Then the dealer's wife goes missing and Duffy and fellow squad members, McCrabbe and Lawson, really dig in to it.

    The problem is the case takes them places they shouldn't go from the IRA headquarters to the top echelons of the police hierarchy. And people start taking serious pot shots at him and Internal Affairs shows up to investigate him. Things look desperate for Duffy.

    This is an excellent series set in Belfast during The Troubles. It's a terrifying time when you have to check under your car for bombs before driving. People live in religious enclaves- the Catholics there and the Prods here. It really makes the times and the city come alive. Carrickfergus, where Duffy works, is a small town outside of Belfast but still struggles with the same problems.

    Duffy is quite erudite so there are lots of musical references, most of which I don't know but enjoy anyway. There are also lots of poems thrown in which adds another dimension. He is definitely not one dimensional and his maturity gives him even more depth.

    This book takes a lot of twists and turns. I never ever saw the ending coming. This is a great addition to an addictive series. I highly recommend it.

  • Eric
    Jan 20, 2017

    Adrian McKinty's Sean Duffy is back again for the sixth time and this novel is as enjoyable as the others.

    The opening to the book (and this does not offer a spoiler) portrays Det. Sean Duffy handcuffed and being led to his yet to be dug grave deep in the woods. Things do not look good at all for Duffy and while reading this portion, one wonders how will Duffy escape from this mess intact.

    The book then flashes back to explain exactly how he found himself in a situation where he's going to take

    Adrian McKinty's Sean Duffy is back again for the sixth time and this novel is as enjoyable as the others.

    The opening to the book (and this does not offer a spoiler) portrays Det. Sean Duffy handcuffed and being led to his yet to be dug grave deep in the woods. Things do not look good at all for Duffy and while reading this portion, one wonders how will Duffy escape from this mess intact.

    The book then flashes back to explain exactly how he found himself in a situation where he's going to take a bullet to the back of the head.

    What I like about McKinty's writing is that while reading the book, because of this effective opening, I wondered is this possibly the last Duffy novel and McKinty is getting ready to move on.

    The main plot to the novel is the investigation of a drug peddler murdered by use of a cross bow arrow. For some reason, in what should be a case no one cares about, apparently people do.

    McKinty throws in all he is good at - the politics and carnage of Ireland, Duffy's wit and rebellion, his trusty sidekick Crabby and all the other usual fixings and it's done in a way that is not boring or repetitive.

    Highly recommended.........especially if you like Ian Rankin's Det. Rebus......

  • Bonnie Brody
    Jan 24, 2017

    The prologue starts out with Detective Sean Duffy of the Carrick, Ireland police department, being led by several people with guns to his own death. He is somewhere near Belfast in an area with many trees which is unusual for Ireland. He is wondering why these people are wanting to kill him.

    The novel goes back in time and Duffy is called in to investigate the murder of a drug dealer by cross bow. This is the second drug dealer killed in this manner. The rule in Belfast during 1988, which is when

    The prologue starts out with Detective Sean Duffy of the Carrick, Ireland police department, being led by several people with guns to his own death. He is somewhere near Belfast in an area with many trees which is unusual for Ireland. He is wondering why these people are wanting to kill him.

    The novel goes back in time and Duffy is called in to investigate the murder of a drug dealer by cross bow. This is the second drug dealer killed in this manner. The rule in Belfast during 1988, which is when this novel takes place, is that no one talks, especially to a 'peeler', or police officer who is also Catholic. Duffy is stymied in his attempts to catch the killer.

    The book goes into Duffy's back story and I found this interesting. He is living with Beth, and together they have a daughter named Emma. They are not married but are a committed monogamous couple. Beth is Protestant and Duffy is Catholic. Beth comes from money and her father does not approve of Duffy at all. Duffy reciprocates the feelings of animosity towards Beth's father.

    As this mystery twists and turns, Duffy shows his stuff. McGinty is a fine writer and at the top of his game.

  • Barbara
    Feb 04, 2017

    Duffy comes through again. He is living with his girlfriend, Beth and baby daughter, Emma on Coronation Road in Carrickfergus. Beth, from a well off Protestant family doesn't like living in this neighborhood of working class Prods. It's not exactly the center of paramilitary activity, but one of their neighbors is high up in one of the Protestant paramilitary organizations. Beth will discover later in the story that having such neighbors can be a good thing.

    A drug-dealer is murdered by crossbow

    Duffy comes through again. He is living with his girlfriend, Beth and baby daughter, Emma on Coronation Road in Carrickfergus. Beth, from a well off Protestant family doesn't like living in this neighborhood of working class Prods. It's not exactly the center of paramilitary activity, but one of their neighbors is high up in one of the Protestant paramilitary organizations. Beth will discover later in the story that having such neighbors can be a good thing.

    A drug-dealer is murdered by crossbow in the middle of a Protestant paramilitary territory on another estate (what Americans call "the projects") and Duffy is called back from holiday with his parents in Donegal, near Glencolumbkille. The victim's Bulgarian wife refuses to talk to the police and they assume she doesn't speak English so get someone from the Bulgarian Embassy in Dublin to come up to Carrick. This begs the question - how did she communicate with her husband? The Bulgarian embassy employee "connects" with Duffy, finding him trustworthy, and proves to be helpful later on in the investigation.

    Duffy finds himself being pursued simultaneously by the Provisional IRA and the police's Special Branch after he manages to do more than ruffle feathers in various camps. He is also unhappy with some upcoming changes in command at his station. Beth and baby Emma never see him, and Beth is wondering why they stay in Northern Ireland.

    Duffy has plenty of opportunities to drive his BMW at 100 mph plus making one wonder why he is never stopped in a country crawling with police and soldiers. I do have a bone to pick about Duffy's claim that it's only an hour and a half from Glencolumbkille to Carrickfergus. Belfast to Glencolumbkille is 143 miles and supposedly a 3 hour drive. He drives it in 88 minutes. I read the ARC so perhaps this discrepancy is corrected in the final version.

    The 4 star rating is due to the fact that the middle of the book seemed to lose momentum but Duffy was probably saving his energy for the final chapters where the s--t hits the fan.