The Flash, Vol. 1: Lightning Strikes Twice

The Flash, Vol. 1: Lightning Strikes Twice

A part of DC Universe: Rebirth! A new storm brews over Central City and disproves the old adage about lightning never, well...you know. Just as Barry begins to feel overwhelmed fighting crime, a new speedster debuts--but just where did this amazing new friend come from? Spinning directly out of the epic events of DC Universe: Rebirth, the Fastest Man Alive finds himself at...

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Title:The Flash, Vol. 1: Lightning Strikes Twice
Author:Joshua Williamson
Rating:
ISBN:140126784X
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:219 pages

The Flash, Vol. 1: Lightning Strikes Twice Reviews

  • Sesana
    Jan 21, 2017

    Honestly, I'm a little disappointed, but I think only because I wanted so badly for this to be good. I love the Flash TV show, and I especially love Barry on it, and I really, really want the Flash comic to be great. And this wasn't great. To be fair, it wasn't by any means bad, either, and my high hopes might be getting in my way. I have no complaints with how Barry is written, I just couldn't get interested in the story. It was a bit too predictable, and I admit that I didn't like that it didn

    Honestly, I'm a little disappointed, but I think only because I wanted so badly for this to be good. I love the Flash TV show, and I especially love Barry on it, and I really, really want the Flash comic to be great. And this wasn't great. To be fair, it wasn't by any means bad, either, and my high hopes might be getting in my way. I have no complaints with how Barry is written, I just couldn't get interested in the story. It was a bit too predictable, and I admit that I didn't like that it didn't concentrate on Wally's return at all. Apparently, that's the job of another book, but it just seems strange that it isn't happening here at all. But did I mention that I really, really like Barry? Because I do, at least enough to give this book another volume.

  • Roxanne
    Sep 15, 2016

    Do you like reading the word 'speed' five hundred times, then you're gonna love this one.

    We get it though, the Speedsters are speedy, from the speed force storm, yup and they're speedy, cool got it, oh no you're gonna remind us again how speedy the speedsters are from the speed force storm, okay Williamson thanks, got it!

    There are some problems with this volume, but for the most part i really loved this one and it turned into a pretty decent read overall. It is despite the 'speedyness' of it qu

    Do you like reading the word 'speed' five hundred times, then you're gonna love this one.

    We get it though, the Speedsters are speedy, from the speed force storm, yup and they're speedy, cool got it, oh no you're gonna remind us again how speedy the speedsters are from the speed force storm, okay Williamson thanks, got it!

    There are some problems with this volume, but for the most part i really loved this one and it turned into a pretty decent read overall. It is despite the 'speedyness' of it quite a slow start, the plot takes a while to gather any 'speedy' pace oh man i see how Williamson fell into this trap of writing 'speedy' every other word. It does lose some focus halfway through the volume, but there are a few sweet moments with Wally that make up for the weaker moments of the story. It does then 'speedily' pick up pace and the last two issues are really good and it does leave you mid action so you're gonna want to pick up the next volume quite 'speedily'.

    I will say the DC writers seem to be obsessed with the double crossing plot device lately as it is appearing in like half of these rebirth volumes and even though it works well in this volume i kind of need the writers to ease off the double crossing, as it will become boring quite fast or 'speedily'.

    Definitely worth picking up, if you're new to Flash there's a good origin story it fills you in really quickly, all characters are introduced well and the double cross works, it does leave an impact, you'll want to read this one. Speedy, speedy, speedy-bo-beedy!

  • Logan
    Sep 27, 2016

    Yawn! So lets keep this short I have other good series to go read! I'll cut to the chase and say I did not like this one! As I read through it, the story was mediocre and predictable; it was average though, so I wasn't hating it, till a new villain was introduced called Godspeed; and guess what ladies and gentlemen??? He's another evil speedster! (Slow Clap) I mean really, how many evil speedster villains is this now? Reverse Flash, Zoom, Black Racer, and now this! Isn't the Speedforce suppose t

    Yawn! So lets keep this short I have other good series to go read! I'll cut to the chase and say I did not like this one! As I read through it, the story was mediocre and predictable; it was average though, so I wasn't hating it, till a new villain was introduced called Godspeed; and guess what ladies and gentlemen??? He's another evil speedster! (Slow Clap) I mean really, how many evil speedster villains is this now? Reverse Flash, Zoom, Black Racer, and now this! Isn't the Speedforce suppose to be limited; and just by having Flash and Reverse Flash alone; puts strain on it? Either way, come on guys, if your going to introduce a new villain, introduce another member for the rogues or something; but not another damn speedster!

  • Shahriar Shafin
    Nov 27, 2016

    What was the New 52 Flash missing?

    Villains? nope, almost every major villain was used.

    Good Writer? nope, Francis Manapul had quite a good run.

    Artist? NOOO, Manapul an Booth drew Flash for the most part.

    What it was missing, was Barry Allen. What it was missing, was emotions. once in a while, a villain would appear, Barry would run, do some colorful stuff, he'd save the day, that's it. The hope that the name Barry Allen spread, was not there. The Flash was not an inspiring figure. THAT, is where t

    What was the New 52 Flash missing?

    Villains? nope, almost every major villain was used.

    Good Writer? nope, Francis Manapul had quite a good run.

    Artist? NOOO, Manapul an Booth drew Flash for the most part.

    What it was missing, was Barry Allen. What it was missing, was emotions. once in a while, a villain would appear, Barry would run, do some colorful stuff, he'd save the day, that's it. The hope that the name Barry Allen spread, was not there. The Flash was not an inspiring figure. THAT, is where this book is so successful.

    Joshua Williamson, the famous serial-killing comic writer (heh) turned Flash into the symbol of hope he always was. He showed the inner struggles of Barry, he captured the spirit of the man, who despite having severe childhood traumas, helps everyone in every way he can, from just the pure good ness of his heart.

    The story is not very ambitious. At times, it felt like Godspeed was being tailor-made just so he could appear in TV series. But then, around issue #5/6, he turned into a very interesting character. what was his identity was not the main interesting thing here, what was intriguing was his motives. Joshua Williamson made him a mirror image of Barry in such a way, we had to feel almost sorry for him. And till the last moment, he didn't to anything 'villainy', giving Barry a hard moral fight.

    The art from Carmine Di Giandomenico is very very expressive. add the colors, and the battles between Flash & Godspeed were so beautiful to watch.

    All in all, why this book stands out? Because it recaptures what The Crimson Comet (Did i use that right?) stands for.

    5/5

  • Steve
    Dec 31, 2016

    I received this from Edelweiss and DC Comics in exchange for an honest review.

    This was ridiculous. A city full of people with powers from the Speed Force? A bad guy with power from the Speed Force called "Godspeed"? Terrible!

  • James DeSantis
    Jan 06, 2017

    You know what? I ended up really enjoying this. Kudos to Joshua for giving us a REAL Barry. Sorry but the New52 Barry wasn't cutting it.

    So the first 8 issues are all about tons of Speedsters coming into play. You got kids, adults, old people all getting struck by lighting and become speedsters just like Barry. The difference? They don't know how to use it.

    It all starts with Barry's friend getting his, and it's cool to see Barry have a partner helping him out. It's like Kid Flash, but not a kid

    You know what? I ended up really enjoying this. Kudos to Joshua for giving us a REAL Barry. Sorry but the New52 Barry wasn't cutting it.

    So the first 8 issues are all about tons of Speedsters coming into play. You got kids, adults, old people all getting struck by lighting and become speedsters just like Barry. The difference? They don't know how to use it.

    It all starts with Barry's friend getting his, and it's cool to see Barry have a partner helping him out. It's like Kid Flash, but not a kid, a grown adult. Yet as the story progresses some big revelations happen.

    I will be honest the twist I didn't love. Very easy to see coming, I felt they could have grown that character out more. Also the name Godspeed felt a little iffy to me. I hated it to be honest. I mean it's superheroes so sometimes names don't work, that was one of em.

    The goods really come from great cast of characters. Everyone has fun dialog and I enjoyed that. The art, while sketchy, is still pretty damn good. Like every speedster looking Super Saiyan 2 with the lighting around them. The ending was solid and made me want more for the future. Oh, did I mention Barry is back to being a actual fun character? Yep!

    Overall this is a real solid start. I'd go with a 3.5 but closer to a 4 than a 3. Hope to see more!

  • Chris Lemmerman
    Jan 13, 2017

    [Read as single issues]

    The New 52 Flash didn't end very well, so it's nice to get a fresh take on the character as new writer Joshua Williamson takes over the title for Rebirth.

    When a Speed Force storm strikes Central City, the Flash suddenly has his hands full training speedsters, as well as the new Kid Flash; and when one of the new speedsters turns out to be a serial killer named Godspeed, things go from bad to worse.

    Williamson juggles a hell of a lot in this eight issue arc, and does a reall

    [Read as single issues]

    The New 52 Flash didn't end very well, so it's nice to get a fresh take on the character as new writer Joshua Williamson takes over the title for Rebirth.

    When a Speed Force storm strikes Central City, the Flash suddenly has his hands full training speedsters, as well as the new Kid Flash; and when one of the new speedsters turns out to be a serial killer named Godspeed, things go from bad to worse.

    Williamson juggles a hell of a lot in this eight issue arc, and does a really good job with almost all of it. There's one reveal that feels a bit obvious, but it's not the reveal that's important but the motivation behind it, so that counterbalances it. His take on Barry is refreshing, and the work he's doing with Kid Flash is very promising. It's no wonder that DC are trusting him with the more Rebirth-related storylines.

    The majority of this arc is handled by Carmine Di Giandomenico, whose thick lines and lightning-filled panels are awesome. There's an issue or two with a fill-in, like Neil Googe or Felipe Watanabe, but these are asides from the ongoing storyline, so the fact that they don't look very much like Di Giandomenico make sense.

    I'm surprised The Flash started with an 8 issue arc; it's the only Rebirth book that did it. But then again it was the only one in the New 52 to do it too, so maybe it's a trend. Either way, this is another in a long line of awesome Rebirth books you should be checking out.

  • Chris
    Jan 14, 2017

    With the variety of comic books growing considerably in recent years, it's crucial that the first volume of a series hooks readers in. If it doesn't, then the potential audience can become lost in a sea of competition.

    For me, no book exemplifies this better than Move Forward, the first arc of the New 52 run of The Flash. While it was visually impressive, I found Barry Allen to be a bland lead character and his adventures fared little better. One volume in and I had no interest in reading any fur

    With the variety of comic books growing considerably in recent years, it's crucial that the first volume of a series hooks readers in. If it doesn't, then the potential audience can become lost in a sea of competition.

    For me, no book exemplifies this better than Move Forward, the first arc of the New 52 run of The Flash. While it was visually impressive, I found Barry Allen to be a bland lead character and his adventures fared little better. One volume in and I had no interest in reading any further.

    Fortunately, Lightning Strikes Twice is a completely different story.

    A new wave of speedsters emerge when a Speed Force storm hits Central City, not all of whom want the powers...or plan to use them for good. The Flash takes responsibility for finding and helping these citizens, but things take a dramatic turn thanks to the arrival of new villain, Godspeed. There's also some brief follow-up to the events of DC's Rebirth issue at the beginning (including

    emotional scene), which thematically links to a sub-plot involving the New 52 Wally West. For the most part though, this book is about Barry Allen and the speedsters and I really enjoyed it.

    Most notably, Barry has a personality and I found him to be a likeable and admirable hero. He always tries to do the right thing and uses his powers tactically, his main goal of saving everyone never faltering. Although things take a darker turn as the story progresses, seeing Barry chat, joke and even flirt a little gave me a clearer sense of who he is. Someone to root for. I also liked the addition of

    .

    Although the idea of Central City having dozens of speedsters wont be to everyone's taste, I thought writer Joshua Williamson handled it well. While the narrative doesn't always flow smoothly, there's never a dull moment. His biggest achievement though is creating an interesting new character in Godspeed. He makes a great adversary for The Flash, to the point that his predictable identity reveal doesn't matter because the confrontation is so well executed.

    Carmine Di Giandomenico and colourist Ivan Plasencia handle art duties for most of the book, along with a couple of well-chosen fill-ins. Appropriately for a series about speedsters, there are some neat visual tricks employed by the art team. Panels are slanted to emphasise characters entering and leaving scenes, lightning trails make the Speed Force look impressive and, in a really cool touch, the tails of word balloons are wrapped around speed vortexes when characters are running in a circle. It helps give the series some extra flair, almost as impressive as the consistency of the artwork and how Di Giandomenico drew seven of the nine issues in this volume.

    Overall, I thought Lightning Strikes Twice was an entertaining and creatively impressive read. The overall tone is largely positive too, making it feel right at home in DC's more optimistic Rebirth line-up. Although I haven't read many other Flash books to compare it to, this still stands head and shoulders above the start of the New 52 run, and i'm looking forward to making room on my shelf for the next volume. Recommended.["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>

  • Sam Quixote
    Jan 24, 2017

    Honestly, I don’t think Flash is for me – I simply cannot see what it is that some people love about this character. He runs fast, yellow lightning surrounds him, I fall asleep – it’s the same with every Flash book whoever the writer is! Flash is one of the blandest superheroes ever created and, six decades later, he’s still chasing after a personality!

    Flash Rebirth starts by recounting two of the biggest reveals from DC Universe Rebirth #1 – SPOILSIES if you haven’t read it – with Flash reunite

    Honestly, I don’t think Flash is for me – I simply cannot see what it is that some people love about this character. He runs fast, yellow lightning surrounds him, I fall asleep – it’s the same with every Flash book whoever the writer is! Flash is one of the blandest superheroes ever created and, six decades later, he’s still chasing after a personality!

    Flash Rebirth starts by recounting two of the biggest reveals from DC Universe Rebirth #1 – SPOILSIES if you haven’t read it – with Flash reunited with white Wally West – an emotional reunion apparently but I’ve been more emotional looking at a stapler – and he and Batman stare at the Comedian’s Smiley Face badge with Batman saying they should probably investigate it. Will this book explore either storyline any further? Nope! White Wally West’s return is covered in Teen Titans Rebirth and the Batman/Flash/Watchmen investigation will be a miniseries called The Button out later this year. (I say “white” Wally West because New 52 black Wally West is also in this book. So there’s now two Wally Wests in this world. Shrug.)

    What we get in this book instead is a lorra nothing! Woohoo…. It literally takes 50 pages before something happens. Random folk are getting hit with Speed Force lightning, turning them into Speedsters. Except one of them, Godspeed, is a bit of a tosser, killing new Speedsters for their Speed Force because he wants their power zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz………. Let’s say speed a few more times because I haven’t said it enough already. Speed, speed, speed. Flash is so speeding dull.

    At 180 pages, this book is the longest Rebirth volume I’ve read so far while also annoyingly having the least going on. Barry teaches the new Speedsters how to use the Speed Force, he fights Godspeed, and that’s basically it. Not that that stops writer Joshua Williamson from loading up the pages with dreary narration and unexciting dialogue that reads like wading through mud. Ironically for a book about the fastest man alive it has an agonisingly slow-moving story. Godspeed’s a weak and unoriginal Flash villain too – he’s just another evil Speedster like Reverse-Flash, Zoom, Fast Bastard, Savitar, and Speed Demon (I made one of them up).

    Carmine Di Giandomenico’s art was quite good. Appropriately for the character, he draws motion well and the fight scenes between Flash and Godspeed were pretty damn spectacular, very… flashy (yukyukyuk)! Sometimes the panels were laid out quite imaginatively too to emphasise the character’s speed.

    I suppose this is an ok introductory book for new readers. You find out who the Flash/Barry is, you get a strong understanding of his powers and a bit of his complex history too - whether you’ll want to read more of him after all that though is another matter! The scenes where Flash is teaching the new Speedsters to use their newfound abilities were surprisingly decent too, particularly when he showed the teen Speedster how to be grounded; mostly though this was a really tedious, frustratingly long-winded and very uninteresting read.

    I’m probably not going to bother with Flash comics anymore regardless of people insisting that this latest one is really good, not like the others; I just end up wanting to blow my brains out from boredom well before I get to the end. This one’s only gonna appeal to that unfathomable sub-set of comics readers, Flash fans.

    SPEED!

  • Stephen
    Feb 11, 2017

    In the The Flash: REBIRTH #1 Barry Allen is out doing the usual as he always does saving people, when suddenly Wally West appears before him and he can't believe his eyes and neither could i, Wally is finally back.

    Now for the first 8 issues. Central City is hit with lighting strikes, several citizens and a colleague of Barry are getting speed-based powers off of it. The Flash also has to deal with a terrorist group called Black Hole.

    Wally only appeared in the first issue of Rebirth but you can

    In the The Flash: REBIRTH #1 Barry Allen is out doing the usual as he always does saving people, when suddenly Wally West appears before him and he can't believe his eyes and neither could i, Wally is finally back.

    Now for the first 8 issues. Central City is hit with lighting strikes, several citizens and a colleague of Barry are getting speed-based powers off of it. The Flash also has to deal with a terrorist group called Black Hole.

    Wally only appeared in the first issue of Rebirth but you can see the influence he had on Barry throughout the trade. Because now Barry wants to train these new speedsters and teach them about the Speed Force.

    The story is pretty straight forward, but it does set up some nice things for future stories.

    I really hope that Williamson will make Wally appear a bit more in the future beacause the interaction between Wally and Barry was the best part of this trade.

    Overal Flash Rebirth was very enjoyable, lets see if the other Rebirth titles are as good or even better.

    Writing: B

    Artwork: B

    Plot: B