Justice League, Volume 1: The Extinction Machines

Justice League, Volume 1: The Extinction Machines

A part of DC Universe: Rebirth!A new day dawns for the Justice League as they welcome a slew of new members into their ranks. The question remains though, can the world's greatest superheroes trust these new recruits? And will the members of League be able to come together against an ancient evil that threatens to reclaim not just the world, but the entire universe!Masterf...

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Title:Justice League, Volume 1: The Extinction Machines
Author:Bryan Hitch
Rating:
ISBN:1401267793
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:168 pages

Justice League, Volume 1: The Extinction Machines Reviews

  • Sesana
    Jan 22, 2017

    You can kind of see the point where DC got a firm yet polite letter from Bioware's legal team. That would be sometime after Hitch stopped calling the giant, vaguely cephalopod aliens Reapers, no longer referred to them as harvesting humanity, and focused more on the indoctrinated humans. (For those who have not played

    , first do that, but turn the game off about fifteen minutes before the end. You'll know when. Then try to read this again without considering DC's legal fees.) The funn

    You can kind of see the point where DC got a firm yet polite letter from Bioware's legal team. That would be sometime after Hitch stopped calling the giant, vaguely cephalopod aliens Reapers, no longer referred to them as harvesting humanity, and focused more on the indoctrinated humans. (For those who have not played

    , first do that, but turn the game off about fifteen minutes before the end. You'll know when. Then try to read this again without considering DC's legal fees.) The funny thing is, I actually think the book suffered from the shift. Who doesn't want to see Superman punch the Reapers out? And that would have been a better and more coherent storyline than this turned out to be. It put me in mind of some of Hickman's weirder cosmic stories in Avengers, something that I just wasn't that big of a fan of. So far, this is my least favorite Rebirth title.

  • Steve
    Jan 20, 2017

    I received this from Edelweiss and DC Comics in exchange for an honest review.

    2 stars, barely.

    This was an overly simplistic plot that really fails to capitalize on the actual superheroes. They're there, but with the exception of Aquaman, Superman, the GLs, and Cyborg, they do an awful lot of just standing around and talking. At times, it felt more like the Super Friends than the Justice League.

  • Logan
    Dec 24, 2016

    NOT....WORTH....YOUR.....TIME!!! If your new to comics and you wanna get into Justice League, go read Geoff Johns New 52 JL run. As far as this one is concerned, you just keep on clicking away!

  • James DeSantis
    Jan 12, 2017

    *Sniff Sniff*

    What's that? Is that a gigantic pile of SHIT!?

    OMFG It's dog shit on my e-reader. On no...it's not that. It's...oh my GOD! GUYS!? It's....Justice League....

    What is this horseshit I just read? Okay I'll be honest. Issue 1 wasn't bad. I was like "Okay, so they doing the set up, not bad, this can be good" then nope. It goes nowhere. It's filled with boring "bad guys" who look like they belong in the B-reel of Watchmen. You got out of character dialog from multiple characters, biggest

    *Sniff Sniff*

    What's that? Is that a gigantic pile of SHIT!?

    OMFG It's dog shit on my e-reader. On no...it's not that. It's...oh my GOD! GUYS!? It's....Justice League....

    What is this horseshit I just read? Okay I'll be honest. Issue 1 wasn't bad. I was like "Okay, so they doing the set up, not bad, this can be good" then nope. It goes nowhere. It's filled with boring "bad guys" who look like they belong in the B-reel of Watchmen. You got out of character dialog from multiple characters, biggest offender is Clark and Batman. I hated both of them here. Oh and fuck me, what kind of anticlimactic shit was that?

    After the horrid Darkseid War I can say this was just as bad if not worse, because it COULD have been great, and it sucked ass. SKIP THIS ONE.

  • Danielle
    Feb 10, 2017

    Read this review and more on my

    I am not gonna lie, for my first ever Justice League story, I was kinda disappointed. I absolutely love all of these characters and I know that they work well together but in The Extinction Machine, at times I got confused as to what was going on. Also, it was not just the storyline that got me confused, at times the artwork was subpar. I

    Read this review and more on my

    I am not gonna lie, for my first ever Justice League story, I was kinda disappointed. I absolutely love all of these characters and I know that they work well together but in The Extinction Machine, at times I got confused as to what was going on. Also, it was not just the storyline that got me confused, at times the artwork was subpar. I guess I just expect the best when it come to the Justice League.

    Lets start with the art style. Majority of the time it was okay, nothing amazing but not bad either. But at the start, the facial expressions, especially for Aquaman and Wonder Woman seemed very forced. Also, the images did not take my attention to where it should have been. I constantly found myself distracted by other stuff going on and not able to truely bring myself to focus on the point of the panel.

    I would have been able to forgive them if it was purely the art style that was a tad off, sometime it does come down to personal presence. But when the storyline does not make up for it, well then we have a problem.

    The storyline is the Justice League are fighting an ancient evil that is never fully explained. I am still trying to understand what they were actually trying to do (apart from destroy Earth obviously). What didn't help was that from the start I was confused. I am not 100% sure if I missed some required reading before reading this volume though as it seems to flow on from a previous issue. And it does not really redeem itself from their. The only saving grace is Aquaman, and we do not get to see much of him. The rest of the team are not doing any damage to this thing (even after reading it, I am still not sure what it is, but it defiantly unmemorable) and Aquaman is trying to take care of the oceans whilst actually making progress against these new enemies.

    I feel like this storyline is going somewhere great, but I do wish that this first volume was better. I will find out whether it was necessary to read this first volume or not I guess.

  • John Yelverton
    Jan 18, 2017

    This is how you write a Justice League story. Each character doing what they do best as a team to defeat the foe. It was even a pleasure to see the Justice League battling against the elements of nature rather than a villain per se.

  • Chris Comerford
    Jan 19, 2017

    A fairly bland beginning. Some of the artwork is nice, and the villains work well in concept (if not execution). Unfortunately, it's let down by an ultimately wooden script, some onerous scenes involving Batman and Lois Lane, and a lacklustre ending. It feels like Hitch wanted to invert one of the things which made Geoff Johns' first JL book so good: instead of everyone working on-site together and emerging as a team, the JL split off to take care of separate issues connected to the main threat.

    A fairly bland beginning. Some of the artwork is nice, and the villains work well in concept (if not execution). Unfortunately, it's let down by an ultimately wooden script, some onerous scenes involving Batman and Lois Lane, and a lacklustre ending. It feels like Hitch wanted to invert one of the things which made Geoff Johns' first JL book so good: instead of everyone working on-site together and emerging as a team, the JL split off to take care of separate issues connected to the main threat. I like that idea, especially since it showcases each member's unique quality which enhances the team (and also Aquaman is there).

    For the record, despite some of the criticisms floating around, this is also not the worst JL book in recent memory, since Cry for Justice, The Villain's Journey and Trinity War still loom large in that regard. This reads like an earnest attempt to write a short, pulpy punch-em-up but ends up being a somewhat disappointing bit of fluff. Not worthy of a flamethrower, but certainly not a must-have.

  • Sam Quixote
    Jan 28, 2017

    I was glad to hear Geoff Johns was leaving Justice League as I wasn’t a fan of his New 52 run and I still wanted to read a great Justice League comic. My optimism was soon dampened though after hearing Bryan Hitch was taking over. Have you read his Image series Real Heroes? The premise is what if actors playing superheroes actually got superpowers and had to save the world for reals. Sounds ok, right? I couldn’t get through the first issue, it was so, so bad - it even gave me a headache!

    The goo

    I was glad to hear Geoff Johns was leaving Justice League as I wasn’t a fan of his New 52 run and I still wanted to read a great Justice League comic. My optimism was soon dampened though after hearing Bryan Hitch was taking over. Have you read his Image series Real Heroes? The premise is what if actors playing superheroes actually got superpowers and had to save the world for reals. Sounds ok, right? I couldn’t get through the first issue, it was so, so bad - it even gave me a headache!

    The good news is Hitch has gotten better since then - marginally. He’s gone from being unreadable to just a poor writer, an improvement but not enough of one. His first Justice League Rebirth book is still pretty bad.

    I can broadly summarise the plot as that tired old cliche of aliens wanting to destroy Earth and the superheroes having to stop them. The details of how they plan to do this or how the Justice League stop them, why the aliens want to do this and who they are though are nebulous at best, and that’s what I mean about bad writing ruining the book for me.

    There are giant insect aliens and giant Doctor Manhattan-types made of people, and I think they’re at war with one another, maybe, or possibly there’s another alien species against them, but the Justice League are hitting every alien in sight regardless. It’s impossible to get too invested in a plot that’s such nonsense.

    I suppose Hitch should get some credit for utilising all the members of the Justice League in the story - they all have a part to play and they effectively work together as a team to beat the bad guys. But they get such dull, static roles: Wonder Woman stands inside one of these giants so we can see their perspective, Aquapants is hanging onto some magic singing crystals that’ll save the day (really), Superman’s got to punch something right hard, and the Lanterns have a green pipeline of something to defeat the baddies. When they all align, it’s like that board game Mouse Trap but with superheroes, all doing their thing one after the other like clockwork! It’s very contrived.

    As an aside, I’m really fed up of newcaster talking heads being used as the Greek chorus, it’s so done and unimaginative. You can always tell the age of a writer when you see this crap deployed because it was everywhere in the ‘80s and ‘90s when it felt more fresh. And Cyborg is once again there to be the info dump guy - another sign of bad writing, when you need a character to vomit exposition just to make sense of the unnecessarily convoluted plot. The ending to this one too is so unsatisfyingly abrupt thanks to Aquapants’ Deus Ex Machina.

    While Hitch is yet another artist who can’t write, his art remains good and I enjoyed the opening issue he illustrated. Tony S. Daniel’s art, while not his best, is also decent here with strong lines and a good eye for interesting page composition.

    Unfortunately there’s not a lot of positives about this one besides the art and almost-robotic utility of the characters; Justice League remains a title with a lot to be desired. And back I go to now waiting for Bryan Hitch to leave the title and hopefully someone good picking it up!

  • Shannon Appelcline
    Feb 09, 2017

    Meh.

    I like bringing the new/old Superman into the Justice League, and I similarly like the integration of two lesser known Green Lanterns. But those are the

    high points of this volume.

    Its biggest problem is that it's a Justice League comic where the Justice League is mostly separated. Meanwhile, the comic is so decompressed that the few pages we get of each character in each issue have them doing the same thing issue after issue. And for some, that's a lot of nothing: Batman and Cyborg stan

    Meh.

    I like bringing the new/old Superman into the Justice League, and I similarly like the integration of two lesser known Green Lanterns. But those are the

    high points of this volume.

    Its biggest problem is that it's a Justice League comic where the Justice League is mostly separated. Meanwhile, the comic is so decompressed that the few pages we get of each character in each issue have them doing the same thing issue after issue. And for some, that's a lot of nothing: Batman and Cyborg stand around in a field for most of the volume.

    Beyond that, the mysterious villains have mysterious motives and they're

    . To be continued in some other dull volume.

  • Brian Poole
    Feb 16, 2017

    enters the

    era with

    .

    After the death of the New 52 Superman, his Justice League teammates warily engage the older Superman who steps into his place. At the same time, they integrate rookie Green Lanterns Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz, appointed by Hal Jordan to protect Earth in his absence. The team first deals with a massive alien creature that attempts to prime Earth for a harvest. The team then deals with a series of devastating natural disasters cau

    enters the

    era with

    .

    After the death of the New 52 Superman, his Justice League teammates warily engage the older Superman who steps into his place. At the same time, they integrate rookie Green Lanterns Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz, appointed by Hal Jordan to protect Earth in his absence. The team first deals with a massive alien creature that attempts to prime Earth for a harvest. The team then deals with a series of devastating natural disasters caused by ancient devices buried in the Earth’s crust. The League is caught between a mechanical alien swarm called The Purge and a quartet of powerful beings called The Kindred, composite creatures made up of hundreds of fused humans to channel primal energy forces. A potential link to one of the heroes emerges and a seeming victory portends more threats to come.

    Better known as an artist, Bryan Hitch has been growing into the role of writer over the past couple years. He gets the new era of

    off to a solid start, paying homage to the Silver Age with the arc’s structure. For much of the story, the League is split up, with solo efforts or teams of two dealing with individual aspects of a bigger threat, then coming together for a rousing climax that unites the whole team and its varied abilities to achieve victory. It’s a decent example of updating a classic plot archetype with a modern sensibility.

    Hitch has a good grasp of his cast and crafts strong moments for each hero. The interactions among the team work fairly well, as the dynamic of a “new” Superman and rookie Green Lanterns bouncing off the established core of the team produces some good drama. Hitch brings in Lois Lane as an impactful supporting character, giving her and Batman some particularly good scenes. The Purge and The Kindred provide a world-shaking challenge worthy of the team, though each feels a tad underdeveloped. But Hitch makes clear there’s more to come from this story avenue and he writes the big action sequences rather convincingly. It’s a good opening arc, one that suggests a lot of promise for the series.

    The team of penciler Tony Daniel, inker Sandru Florea and colorist Tomeu Morey handles the bulk of the art chores for The Extinction Machines. They nail the “big screen” aesthetic that a book like this requires, assaying large scale fight and adventure sequences with a lot of style, while also infusing the quieter moments with enough tension and dynamism to keep the energy level up. Morey does some especially impressive work, as the demands of the story call for an expansive palette, specialized coloring effects and careful attention to the mood and shadings of scenes. In addition to the primary team, Hitch himself pencils the Rebirth special issue (working with Daniel Henriques and Alex Sinclair) and Jesus Merino and Andy Owens spell the Daniel/Florea team on an issue mid-arc. Hitch brings his distinctive style to his kick-off issue, while Merino and Owens work in a similar enough vein to Daniel and Florea to make the substitution fairly seamless. So far, at least, the book is holding up to its twice monthly schedule with minimal cause for comment.

    While some knowledge of recent DC history is a benefit, it’s not necessarily crucial to enjoy

    . Hitch and company craft a classic

    story that’s enjoyable and an effective launch for the new era.