Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers

Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers

The latest groundbreaking tome from Tim Ferriss, the #1 New York Times best-selling author of The 4-Hour Workweek.  From the author:   “For the last two years, I’ve interviewed more than 200 world-class performers for my podcast, The Tim Ferriss Show. The guests range from super celebs (Jamie Foxx, Arnold Schwarzenegger, etc.) and athletes (icons of powerlifting, gymnastic...

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Title:Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers
Author:Timothy Ferriss
Rating:
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Kindle Edition
Number of Pages:707 pages

Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers Reviews

  • Kelly
    Dec 10, 2016

    A meta-reading experience because, having read 150-200 books per year for the past few years and taking notes/insights on all of them, this entire book looks like what my annual book logs look like. Hence, I was highlighting all over the book (195 highlights apparently, since Kindle now integrates highlights into Goodreads). Tim Ferriss produced a book from his podcasts like I produce learnings and notes from the books I read, so this book was well-suited to my style.

  • Antony L. Butler
    Dec 09, 2016

    In Tools of Titans, Tim grabbed some of the best of his podcast and moved it into print. But the content is missing real structure and is mixed with silly nonsense that is meant to be funny but misses the mark such as favorite spirit animals and his useless billboard question. There are some golden nuggets in here and they are worth going after, I just had to work a little harder than I wanted. It was worth the price especially after 200+free episodes of the podcast w

    In Tools of Titans, Tim grabbed some of the best of his podcast and moved it into print. But the content is missing real structure and is mixed with silly nonsense that is meant to be funny but misses the mark such as favorite spirit animals and his useless billboard question. There are some golden nuggets in here and they are worth going after, I just had to work a little harder than I wanted. It was worth the price especially after 200+free episodes of the podcast which I enjoy every week.

  • Michael Werner
    Dec 11, 2016

    This is an EXCEPTIONAL book. Part philosophy, part business, and part story, Ferriss distills some of the most important lessons he has learned through his own experiments with life and work, as well as from the dozens of successful people from all walks of life he has befriended or interviewed for his podcast and writings.

    I have tried several times to read the book from the beginning, but have found it impossible because he will cover something that inspires me to jump to another part of the b

    This is an EXCEPTIONAL book. Part philosophy, part business, and part story, Ferriss distills some of the most important lessons he has learned through his own experiments with life and work, as well as from the dozens of successful people from all walks of life he has befriended or interviewed for his podcast and writings.

    I have tried several times to read the book from the beginning, but have found it impossible because he will cover something that inspires me to jump to another part of the book.

    It is also a book, because of its short sections, you can leave near your desk or reading pile and just jump into for a few minutes at a time.

    I love this book and it is now in my Top 5er list of more than one category

    Note to Tim: Sir, when you update this jewel, I would love to see an index. Please.

  • Remington Purnell
    Dec 12, 2016

    In short: Tim Ferris at his most stereotypical: engaging, informative, and accessible.

    is

    readable and

    smart. Ferris' curiosity about other people's habits is contagious. It's also the first book in a while that I couldn't put down-- and was personally helpful as someone on the cusp of college graduation to help vet some important decisions in my life. (I.E. If a career/personal decision isn't an automatic "HELL YES!", it's an automatic "No".)

    If you're-- as anoth

    In short: Tim Ferris at his most stereotypical: engaging, informative, and accessible.

    is

    readable and

    smart. Ferris' curiosity about other people's habits is contagious. It's also the first book in a while that I couldn't put down-- and was personally helpful as someone on the cusp of college graduation to help vet some important decisions in my life. (I.E. If a career/personal decision isn't an automatic "HELL YES!", it's an automatic "No".)

    If you're-- as another another reviewer put it, "well-traversed" in the self-improvement/self-development book sphere-- you may find this book lacks existential and philosophical depth. Ferris explores the "How?" of successful people, but not the "Why?". Sure, these billionaires, icons, and world-class performers use meditation and the law of category to become successful-- but why did these icons choose to become venture capitalists or writers? Are these people satisfied in their careers? Are icons helping others?

    However, I am of the opinion that a fulfilling life is built through two categories. The first through selfish personal development: confidence-building, independence, raw ambition, exploration, travel, and goal-setting. The second through building meaning: service, relationship-building, investing in community, and spirituality.

    exists solely in the former. Which is totally fine, just expect that category.

    is 100% about personal maximization.

    Anyways, stepping off my soapbox because this book is awesome and thoroughly recommend it to anyone who wants to maximize their productivity and fangirl over Malcolm Gladwell more than they already do. Also, he interviews the Bobby Fisher guy, which makes this book in itself completely legendary. Highly recommend.

  • Lisa A. Carlson
    Dec 13, 2016

    American author, public speaker Timothy Ferriss has compiled a book perfect for the generation obsessed with famous people. Apparently, the famous have some infinite wisdom/quotes which will elevate the rest of us peasants to success. First problem. The foreward is done by Arnold Schwarzenegger. Someone who cheats on his wife with a woman who works for the family and has a child with her is no role model for anyone. At over 600 pages this hardcover book would be a useful tool to hit someone over

    American author, public speaker Timothy Ferriss has compiled a book perfect for the generation obsessed with famous people. Apparently, the famous have some infinite wisdom/quotes which will elevate the rest of us peasants to success. First problem. The foreward is done by Arnold Schwarzenegger. Someone who cheats on his wife with a woman who works for the family and has a child with her is no role model for anyone. At over 600 pages this hardcover book would be a useful tool to hit someone over the head with to get them motivated as nothing in here is inspiring. Rather than read this nonsense use these tools if you want to succeed; listen to the one or two friends who support and care about you, tap into what makes you happy each day, trust your instincts as they never lie, be a compassionate human being regardless of how much you have, be active, eat well, get adequate sleep and have a laser focus to make your passion come true. It's possible just believe in yourself.

  • Harper Bliss
    Dec 23, 2016

    I'm the kind of person who laps up inspirational books like this one. I greatly enjoyed Tools of Titans, but I have to deduct a star because what kind of message does it send when out of the 114 people the author profiles for nuggets of greatness, insight, and wisdom, only 12 are women? (Yes, I counted.)

  • Ran
    Dec 17, 2016

    What an awful book.

    With Tim there is this status quo that you must say "wow" on everything he does, because he is very enthusiastic and controversial, but to be honest its not the case here.

    Basically the book is like surfing the web and read about eclectic products and see ads.

    The ads are cross promotions Tim does to his friends and companies, and the products are things he tried and most of the time are too specific and not in public interest .

    ( e.g being too specific about kinds of tea, and m

    What an awful book.

    With Tim there is this status quo that you must say "wow" on everything he does, because he is very enthusiastic and controversial, but to be honest its not the case here.

    Basically the book is like surfing the web and read about eclectic products and see ads.

    The ads are cross promotions Tim does to his friends and companies, and the products are things he tried and most of the time are too specific and not in public interest .

    ( e.g being too specific about kinds of tea, and minutes it takes to drink them, what he drinks first)

    Too many cross promotional of other products ( or startups he invested in, friends, etc)

    Too many details on things that really does not interesting nobody/ no one has the time to do them.

    Who cares that if you do sauna at 170.5 degrees 4 times a week, its good for injury ? how many people really injured? who can visit sauna 4 times a week?

    If you count all the things he writes as his "morning rituals" you would end up in a full day, and thats not including evening rituals.

    The "business" section, interviewing such an amazing people, but asking them so many stupid questions, sometimes so specific like how many times you visit the toilet.

    I think there is overrated hype about him only because he is controversial, and people think they would listen and also have such a diversity in their life.

    Not worth reading, specially not 700 pages.

  • Aman Mittal
    Dec 23, 2016

    I introduced myself to Tim Ferriss last year when I randomly found a post on his blog in which he had interviewed Maria Popova. Actually, I was searching for Brain Picking’s Maria Popova’s interviews as she is such an inspiring blogging personality, the way she curate the content for every post is amazing and seems an example of a creative process, just right out of her imagination.You must check out Brain Pickings. Moreover, scan through Tim Ferriss’ blog which is called FourHourWorkWeek.com an

    I introduced myself to Tim Ferriss last year when I randomly found a post on his blog in which he had interviewed Maria Popova. Actually, I was searching for Brain Picking’s Maria Popova’s interviews as she is such an inspiring blogging personality, the way she curate the content for every post is amazing and seems an example of a creative process, just right out of her imagination.You must check out Brain Pickings. Moreover, scan through Tim Ferriss’ blog which is called FourHourWorkWeek.com and got introduced to his podcast, The Tim Ferriss Show [Podcast Link]. He has done an amazing job by taking more than hundred 60+ minute interviews with some of the successful and interesting people by digging deep into their “mind”, process of their workings, process of maintaining their bodies, listening to their suggestions and how do they motivate, inspire, live and do something that they love to do.

    Tools of Titans is an enormous collection of bits and pieces of interviews that are available on his podcast and highlights the major theme of most of the interviews Tim has included in this book. The book is huge, exceeding 700 pages and is certainly not meant to be read all at once. It’s not Tolstoy’s War and Peace or David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest that you can read continuously without moving your body parts for next 7 to 10 days or so. Bear in mind, reading Tools of Titans will take more than that many days since it has a sheer amount of practical information to be processed by our mind. I’d recommend you to take your time with each interview described by Tim, think over it, if there’s a book recommended in between as there are so some interesting book recommendations, try to read few of them or at least do a little research on why the book is being recommended, what’s there inside and is the book for you? Then you can definitely add it to your TBR.

    For the last 18 days I have been getting up early to read a few chapters of this book. I found its better to change my routine of to spending time on Medium or Wordpress for some days and as the sun rises, I get to dwell in a book. I have been reading this book on my Kindle for the sole purpose to take notes comfortably and not to disturb my reading process. I love highlighting and in recent months it has proved beneficiary for me to reuse the highlights in my blog posts as paraphrasing or go through the highlights in later time, to get a glimpse of a particular book that I read and don’t want to re-read it again. (I will be posting a collection of my book notes soon…Look out for it)

    The book is divided into three sections: Healthy, Wealthy & Wise. If there’s another title for Tools for Titans, I imagine it’d be “Healthy, Wealthy & Wise”. In the Healthy section, there are professional athletes, researchers and world famous doctors who share their best insights, tips and tricks for a healthy living and having an efficient diet that will help you to go through your day, each day.

    The second section is on Wealthy. This is section is the fact that this book is a great business book. Memorable sections that include actionable ideas, suggestions, tools for taking your personal brand and business to the next level. There’s a major theme of this section and that is to learn from other experiences. You can only experience one thing in one moment of a time but reading is a great asset that gets you familiar with more than one experience in one particular moment of time.

    Last section: Wise. This is my favourite part of the book. I was really captivated by different process that people implement in their daily working life that includes mental toughness, brevity of language, and observing things. Learning how to learn is probably the best investment you can make in yourself. This part is all about that. On a closer look you will observe how the simple Tim’s questions are and yet they simple ones have more detailed answers. He has even included his rapid fire questionnaire in the end of the book that I am going to take a look into and amend some of them in the interviews that I take.

    Another thing that I liked about this book is the way Tim projects his own voice in between these interviews which are a representation of his self-doubting, and self-motivated emotions. This way the book became more interesting with change of dialogs and I find them useful and motivating as they shine more light on a specific topic of discussion.

    Everything that is mentioned in this book whether a person or a book, is accurately indexed at the end of this books opening doors for to reference to it later.

  • E
    Jan 03, 2017

    Ugh. Tim Ferriss. First of all, you blew your credibility with me years ago in your debut "Four Hour Work Week" book - when you touted someone who quit their job to open a great surf camp in Brazil and I knew this person and it was a huge failure and that person is now back at a desk job.

    So another one. Tough to get through and then some life changing gem of a sentence pops up amongst the B.S. so you keep pushing through the nonsense. The health and work out advice up front from various "experts

    Ugh. Tim Ferriss. First of all, you blew your credibility with me years ago in your debut "Four Hour Work Week" book - when you touted someone who quit their job to open a great surf camp in Brazil and I knew this person and it was a huge failure and that person is now back at a desk job.

    So another one. Tough to get through and then some life changing gem of a sentence pops up amongst the B.S. so you keep pushing through the nonsense. The health and work out advice up front from various "experts" is quite monotonous (and I am a work out nut myself.) And the advice from the psycho hallucinogenic expert person who recommends taking a light level of mushrooms every 6-8 weeks to improve their life - I just don't think that will work for me and not sure it will improve my life (I wish I had the life where it did - it sounds fun.)

    In a nutshell, Tim Ferriss is a privileged Princetonian riding on this mindless start-up craze in the Bay Area - if everyone was an "expert" or outsourced all of the work in their life or spent all of their time working out and hob nobbing with the "titans" - what would get done in the world? who would do the coding at these tech start-ups? Is it the elite Princeton grads who are to delegate the work to Asia or India? It all makes no sense.

    Some of his "world class" performers include media freaks like Arnold Schwarzenegger - I don't want to hear any advice from him - dude cheated on his wife with his maid and watched that boy grow up in his household - I could give him advice. (If you are going to have an affair with your maid - use protection.)

    Tim Ferris -keep living in your bubble - I am putting your book down now and I am sorry that I paid any $ for it which might go to fuel your insanity.

    Oh forgot to add - he talks about his equivalent of a Stanford MBA - he invested 120k in various start up companies and made money. Dude missed the point completely (as a Stanford MBA I can say this)- the network, taking ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE courses and having that stamp of having taken such courses. Most people who go to business school don't have 120k in cash to invest in start ups - they take on the debt in the hopes of earning that cash or a stable career that will provide them with cash flow and a net that will help them when things get challenging. I get what he is saying in terms of ROI - but that was where I lost all respect for him. Another data point of where it is someone spouting off on something they know absolutely nothing about.

  • B
    Jan 01, 2017

    Ferriss is inane and narcissistic. These faults were forgiven in his previous books because they provided me with numerous actionable hacks which I put to immediate, quantifiable, and beneficial use. "Tools of Titans" is bad relative to his "4-Hour" series chiefly because it provides fewer of these practical tips. "Tools of Titans" is also bad in its own right for indulging in folk psychological self-help stupidity. Far too many pages are filled with the vain ramblings of business entrepreneurs

    Ferriss is inane and narcissistic. These faults were forgiven in his previous books because they provided me with numerous actionable hacks which I put to immediate, quantifiable, and beneficial use. "Tools of Titans" is bad relative to his "4-Hour" series chiefly because it provides fewer of these practical tips. "Tools of Titans" is also bad in its own right for indulging in folk psychological self-help stupidity. Far too many pages are filled with the vain ramblings of business entrepreneurs who, despite having done nothing more significant than creating just another unnecessary internet tool, are credited with possessing vast amounts of worldly wisdom. The few standout entrepreneurs--e.g., Peter Thiel, Peter Diamandis--are eccentrics with grand personal missions which extend far beyond the goal of making money. Unfortunately, most of Tim's questions to businessmen are about profiteering and are thus profoundly inapplicable to everyday life and self-improvement. Sometimes Tim crawls so far up his own ass in his attempt to make this book appealing that he deigns to describe how he cooks his eggs (in boiling water, wow); what music he listened to once upon a time (Breaking Benjamin, fucking wow); and how many friends he has (most of the interviewees are so chummy with him that they're going to be a godparent to his kids, wow). Tim likes to blow his own horn, but none of his personal input in this book is worth reading, and only a vanishingly small percentage of whatever else he's included will straightforwardly help you. Most of his books are scattershot hits and misses, but taken as a whole "Tools of Titans" itself is a void-sized miss.