Love Warrior

Love Warrior

The highly anticipated new memoir by bestselling author Glennon Doyle Melton tells the story of her journey of self-discovery after the implosion of her marriage.Just when Glennon Doyle Melton was beginning to feel she had it all figured out—three happy children, a doting spouse, and a writing career so successful that her first book catapulted to the top of the New York T...

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Title:Love Warrior
Author:Glennon Doyle Melton
Rating:
ISBN:1250128544
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:272 pages

Love Warrior Reviews

  • Kelsey
    May 16, 2016

    With each chapter I read of this book, I thought of someone new I wanted to recommend it to. Eventually settling on everyone. Everyone should read this book. Love Warrior is about being vulnerable, shedding your "representative(s)", and being enough.

  • Sarah
    Jun 12, 2016

    I was excited to win the "advanced reader copy" lottery and get this book, but figured I'd finish it once my summer vacation had started - I finished it in 24 hours. I read Glennon Doyle Melton's other book - Carry On, Warrior - and loved her sense of humor and her writing style on her blog, but this book was a new voice I hadn't heard from her before that I loved. It was deep and weighty and lovely and poetic and heartbreaking. I am not nor ever have been married, but the book spoke about love

    I was excited to win the "advanced reader copy" lottery and get this book, but figured I'd finish it once my summer vacation had started - I finished it in 24 hours. I read Glennon Doyle Melton's other book - Carry On, Warrior - and loved her sense of humor and her writing style on her blog, but this book was a new voice I hadn't heard from her before that I loved. It was deep and weighty and lovely and poetic and heartbreaking. I am not nor ever have been married, but the book spoke about love in a way that transcends and yet also is inextricably linked to marriage. The author and I also disagree in several ways about God, but when she describes love and forgiveness, I read deep gospel truths there.

    One of my favorite lines was "the paradox of pain is that it is only universal in retrospect. In the present, it is fiercely personal" (145). This memoir is an author taking her fiercely personal journey and making it available for us all to connect to the universal experience of discovering that we have been sold a bill of goods from the world about what love is and we have to unlearn what we've learned to discover true, deep love. Highly recommend.

  • Kelsey
    Jul 11, 2016

    There were many parts of this book that I LOVED, parts that challenged me and made me think. Some of it felt self absorbed and frustrated me.

  • Brittany
    Jul 22, 2016

    Thank you to Goodsread/author for sending me a review of this book. So I've had quite a few problems with this book, but mostly just with the main character. She was very whiny to me. She complained about her life a lot and I'm just asking what for? She wants to feel pretty, smart, accepted, etc. But why? We are almost never told why. The only thing we're given is when she was a little girl she was bigger and ate junk food. She wanted to lose weight so she became bulimic. But she was trying to b

    Thank you to Goodsread/author for sending me a review of this book. So I've had quite a few problems with this book, but mostly just with the main character. She was very whiny to me. She complained about her life a lot and I'm just asking what for? She wants to feel pretty, smart, accepted, etc. But why? We are almost never told why. The only thing we're given is when she was a little girl she was bigger and ate junk food. She wanted to lose weight so she became bulimic. But she was trying to be this perfect girl and I could not fathom why. It seemed like she had a good life growing up. Of course no one's life is perfect, but what is up with this girl? She whines and whines and then eventually it's like she has no feelings for people who might actually give a shit. She cares about what all these students in her school think, but could care less about her family, friends, and boyfriend. I get we're being told the story from the beginning, but the way it's told I wanted more. Like why is our main character trying to find validation? Why does she feel fat? I just got annoyed and gave up. If the main character is a whiny brat I'm not interested. The writing was done very well, I just could not stand the main character.

  • Becca
    Jul 29, 2016

    As I sit here in rehab with my newly sober shakey hands just finishing Glennons Love Warrior in one night all I can think is thank freakin' god.

    .

    My heart fills my whole chest but does not hurt. I let her look right at me and she is not mad. She and I are the same. She loves me, I know it. She has been waiting for me. I sit in front of her and she is what I needed, she is the hiding place Iv been looking for. She is not mad. Glennon is my Mary. She is my red velvet carpet. She is my candle of pr

    As I sit here in rehab with my newly sober shakey hands just finishing Glennons Love Warrior in one night all I can think is thank freakin' god.

    .

    My heart fills my whole chest but does not hurt. I let her look right at me and she is not mad. She and I are the same. She loves me, I know it. She has been waiting for me. I sit in front of her and she is what I needed, she is the hiding place Iv been looking for. She is not mad. Glennon is my Mary. She is my red velvet carpet. She is my candle of prayers not my bottle of wisky.

    .

    Amen! A-freakin-men. Glennon carries her pain and the pain of others with such GRIT and GRACE and then lays it out bear and hands us the most precious gift she has to give. This book is all the things we are desperately too afraid to say, it's all the ugly truths and scariest words spoken for us, she does not fluff or sprinkle the glitter over a single word, she is brave and sensitive and honest and vulnerable and scared and joyful, she is courageous, she is the canary and the warrior and the sister all rolled into one. She doesn't turn away, she is with us and we are with her, we wont turn away. Me too. Me too. Me too. We are all the same. This book is pain sneakingly heart wrenching, it is not for the weak willed, it takes courage just to read it and stay with it and allow it to take hold of you and change you all up inside, it will break your heart open but you won't want to put it back together again, you'll know your heart is better broken open and wonder why ever did you strive for an unbroken heart before. This isnt a book about pretty glossy pain, this book is raw and an ugly beautiful claw yourself out of your own skin pain. Read this book, be gentle with yourselves and with her, watch her carefully, learn from her, she knows things we don't yet know and she's sharing them with us. She is women's saving grace, we belong to her, there is no judgement there, she's right alongside us and she's holding our hands. Let's be careful with her and her book and hold her hand right back. .

  • Noelle
    Sep 09, 2016

    This book just did not do it for me. I've read her blog some and her first book but this one just seemed to be choppy writing and SO much about her dislike of having sex. I generally enjoy her authenticity. I thought it droned on and on but clearly I'm in the minority on Goodreads.

  • Melanie
    Sep 12, 2016

    I consumed this book like I used to consume Stoli O with cranberry juice when I, too, was trying not to feel so much. I highlighted half the book, and that says enough, methinks.

  • Michelle
    Sep 15, 2016

    I have to admit...I'd previously read a few of Melton's blog posts and deemed her style "not for me." Too religious? Too "dramatic" (whatever that means)? I'm not sure. I did not read her first book but picked up this on friend's recommendation and, frankly, because I couldn't believe what a tizzy Jennifer Weiner threw when THIS book was chosen by Oprah, not hers. Well, I was thoroughly impressed by Melton's work...so, well done, Oprah!

    Though I have little in common with the author other than be

    I have to admit...I'd previously read a few of Melton's blog posts and deemed her style "not for me." Too religious? Too "dramatic" (whatever that means)? I'm not sure. I did not read her first book but picked up this on friend's recommendation and, frankly, because I couldn't believe what a tizzy Jennifer Weiner threw when THIS book was chosen by Oprah, not hers. Well, I was thoroughly impressed by Melton's work...so, well done, Oprah!

    Though I have little in common with the author other than being a wife, mother, writer, and sometimes chronic overachiever, there is so much to love here. My favorite parts were the simple note her father left in a time of extreme crisis ("Everything will be okay") and her accidental stumbling into a hot yoga class. She (literally) sat on the mat? And just endeavored to "get through" whilst not executing a single pose? All with the teacher's knowing, yet unfamiliar glance? Perfection.

    This memoir is chiefly about Melton's trust issues--with herself and with her husband after his affairs are revealed--but there is so much more to get out of it. The book ends with their reconciliation. A few weeks before publication, the author confessed that they are separating again. As a writer, I am familiar with the (insanely long) production cycle and there is 0% chance she was able to revise the book prior to publication. Knowing about the separation going into the reading of this, there is not one thing, not a single speck that rings untrue. I am convinced that she is every bit the "truth teller" she claims to be...and I admire her generosity of spirit. All that and this is EXTREMELY well written, even though there is, as expected, a fair amount of religion (but not too much). I did not expect to love this book as much as I did.

  • Samantha
    Sep 18, 2016

    Self indulgent and long winded memoir of a "mom" blogger. I'm sad I cannot get the time back I spent reading this book. A true disappointed.

  • Cheri
    Nov 11, 2016

    3.5 Stars - not rounded up

    I may be in the minority on this one, but I had no idea who Glennon Doyle Melton was, I never heard of her first book, and I’ve never read her blog.

    As a young girl, she had body-image issues, the daughter of a practically perfect in every way mother, and spent most of her pre-teen years and beyond trying to attain her idea of a perfect body through anorexia and bulimia. As her friends become sexually intimate with their boyfriends, she does, as well, although she begin

    3.5 Stars - not rounded up

    I may be in the minority on this one, but I had no idea who Glennon Doyle Melton was, I never heard of her first book, and I’ve never read her blog.

    As a young girl, she had body-image issues, the daughter of a practically perfect in every way mother, and spent most of her pre-teen years and beyond trying to attain her idea of a perfect body through anorexia and bulimia. As her friends become sexually intimate with their boyfriends, she does, as well, although she begins to abuse alcohol, in part to be more “fun,” and to deal with her dislike of sex in general. Bulimia and alcohol do not a healthy person make. After some time passing in this way, she finds herself peeing on a stick for a second pregnancy, one she will keep.

    A marriage follows, and siblings. Infidelity.

    But the real story is how, after years of running from herself, from showing only her “representative” to her world, not her “real” self, she realizes that’s not enough. This is her story of her journey to find her authentic self. The process she has to go through before she can even accept responsibility for her part in what remains. This is the part of this personal story that felt worthwhile to read, to me.

    On the other hand, there’s a not insignificant part of this that felt like when children rant how about unfair life can be. Unable and unwilling to even look at the other side of the story, as though self-pity became the new coping mechanism. It seems all very real, and I can’t fault her for including this part of her real life, but it made it difficult to feel any sympathy for her during those moments. I never, on the other hand, felt as though she was asking for sympathy or expecting it.