Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Harry Potter is lucky to reach the age of thirteen, since he has already survived the murderous attacks of the feared Dark Lord on more than one occasion. But his hopes for a quiet term concentrating on Quidditch are dashed when a maniacal mass-murderer escapes from Azkaban, pursued by the soul-sucking Dementors who guard the prison. It's assumed that Hogwarts is the safes...

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Title:Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Author:J.K. Rowling
Rating:
ISBN:043965548X
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Mass Market Paperback
Number of Pages:435 pages

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Reviews

  • Chris
    Jan 31, 2008

    Crookshanks swished his tail back and forth as he crept up the stairs to the boys' bedrooms. He knew the rat wasn't what it was pretending to

    Crookshanks swished his tail back and forth as he crept up the stairs to the boys' bedrooms. He knew the rat wasn't what it was pretending to be, but all of his attempts to alert the humans to this fact had failed. "I don't know why I even bother," he muttered to himself. "I could get along fine without any of them. Let the rat do whatever it is it's trying to do. So long as Girl keeps feeding me and scratching my belly, I'll - hello, what's this?"

    He could smell the rat. Its scent was like nothing Crookshanks had ever smelled, and for all his time living in a magical pet shop, he'd smelled a lot. The rat did smell like a rat, yes, but there was also something else. Something... human. It was just like that big black dog he'd met on the grounds the other day. Every instinct in him had screamed to run away, but there was that smell. And even Crookshanks knew what they said about cats and curiosity. The dog had turned out to be more than just a dog, and it had convinced Crookshanks to help it. First order of business: retrieve a certain rat from the bedroom of the Red-Haired Boy.

    The Boy wasn't in, but the rat was. Crookshanks circled the bed a few times. This time, maybe, he would be able to get the damn thing. He tensed for a moment and then leapt onto the bed.

    By luck or skill, he was nearly on top of the thing when he landed. "A-HA!" he yowled. "Gotcha!" He pinned the rat under his sizable paw. "Where you gonna run to now, ratty?" he asked, sneering as best he could.

    The rat writhed in his grip. "Please," it said. "Just let me go. You don't know what will happen if you eat me, it would be a terrible mistake!"

    "A mistake, eh?" the cat said. "We'll see about that. I have a great big doggie friend who's just aching to get his jaws around you...."

    He barely had time to finish his sentence when the rat went mad. It squealed and bit and slashed with its paws. And then, against all of Crookshanks' previous experience - it grew! It nearly threw the cat off the bed as it became much more massive - its legs lengthened and its arms stretched until it had reached a human size and shape. Crookshanks goggled. Of all the things he'd expected from this rat, this wasn't it. The human grabbed at him, but Crookshanks was too fast. He jumped off the bed and shimmied under the wardrobe, where he could see but not be seen.

    The human looked around, breathing heavily. He was pale and thin, and still looked ratty. "Think, Peter, think," he said. "Gotta get out of here, but..." He stopped, glanced at the wardrobe, and grimaced. "You may just have given me my way out, cat," he said. And then he bit the ball of his hand.

    Blood dripped out, leaving spreading red blotches on the sheets. "They'll think it was you," he said. "They'll leave me for dead and I'll be free to rejoin my Lord." He looked at the recently repaired curtains on Ron's bed. "It's not safe here anymore." He sucked at the wound to stop the bloodflow and then went to the window. Perched on the windowsill, he looked over at Crookshanks' hiding place. "If I were human," he said, "the fall would kill me. But as a rat...." His body rippled and twisted and shrank, and then there was an old grey rat on the sill. Crookshanks was pretty sure it winked at him before leaping off.

    After a minute or two, Crookshanks wriggled out from under the wardrobe, his thoughts dark. The Red-Haired Boy was going to be angry, and so was the Girl. But more importantly, the Dog was going to be furious. It was barely holding on to its sanity as it was. Crookshanks shook his head. This was going to get worse before it would get better...

  • Raeleen Lemay
    Jun 26, 2010

    Harry is getting his sass on. I love it.

    OH MAN. THIS BOOK IS SO MY FAVORITE.

    The phone conversation at the beginning between Ron and Uncle Vernon was PRICELESS. I wish so much that that scene had been in the movie.

    I was so into reading this book that I failed to take notes, so I don't have many specifics to add except that I love how Crookshanks was basically Sirius's secret agent spy cat friend and I LOVE THAT.

    Also, this

    Harry is getting his sass on. I love it.

    OH MAN. THIS BOOK IS SO MY FAVORITE.

    The phone conversation at the beginning between Ron and Uncle Vernon was PRICELESS. I wish so much that that scene had been in the movie.

    I was so into reading this book that I failed to take notes, so I don't have many specifics to add except that I love how Crookshanks was basically Sirius's secret agent spy cat friend and I LOVE THAT.

    Also, this book demonstrated some very REAL aspects of school. For example, Hermione took on too much work, and she gradually started to go crazy (and consequently distanced herself from her friends, became more moody, and then finally just bitch-slapped Malfoy). I also found Oliver Wood to be hilarious in this book for similar reasons: this was his last year at Hogwarts, and he wanted nothing more than to win the Quidditch Cup so he could have some sort of glory at Hogwarts, and he became so consumed by it (as I'm sure lots of people on sports teams do). The way he was so emotionally invested really cracked me up but also felt so real.

    Side note: CEDRIC IS SO DAMN NICE. when he realized that Harry fell off his broom during the Quidditch game and Hufflepuff won he called for a rematch, which says a lot about him, and it just makes what happens in the next book that much worse.

    But of course, all of the Marauders stuff made my inner fangirl go nuts because it has to be my favorite Harry Potter storyline. (I mean, I didn't name my YouTube channel after them or anything...)

    Also time travel.

  • Inge
    Sep 12, 2011
  • Saniya
    Oct 24, 2011

    Of-course, this book was EPIC! =D

    Its Harry Potter now. It has to be epic! *Rolling eyes but smiling widely* xD

  • Zoë
    Jun 09, 2012

    “Don't let the muggles get you down.”

    Yup yup yup I love this book.

  • Khanh (the Grinch)
    Nov 25, 2012

    I last read this book when I was 14 years old, given that I'm almost 32 now, I have a whole new perspective on it. Despite the fact that I gave this book 5 stars previously, I have to admit that it didn't grow on me until this, my second read.

    Confession time: I didn't like Remus or Sirius.

    *Khanh ducks as rotten fruit and eggs are thrown her way*

    OK, OK, I'M SORRY! I've since changed my mind! Notice that I used the past tense.

    Obviously, there will be

    for the book below, for the 1.5 of yo

    I last read this book when I was 14 years old, given that I'm almost 32 now, I have a whole new perspective on it. Despite the fact that I gave this book 5 stars previously, I have to admit that it didn't grow on me until this, my second read.

    Confession time: I didn't like Remus or Sirius.

    *Khanh ducks as rotten fruit and eggs are thrown her way*

    OK, OK, I'M SORRY! I've since changed my mind! Notice that I used the past tense.

    Obviously, there will be

    for the book below, for the 1.5 of you who haven't read this yet.

    I can't even recall why this book wasn't memorable to me. All I remembered was that Sirius - and what happened to him - was terrible, but he's like meh to me; I just never connected with him as a character. Remus was a werewolf and I've never liked werewolves. The Marauders in general were just a bunch of rowdy teenaged boys, and having been the target for teasing from rowdy, rude teenaged boys in my youth, I just didn't care for the way they were portrayed. And I was right, somewhat, James, et al weren't perfect. They bullied Snape, they were little shitheads.

    Yes, eventually they became productive, admirable members of society, but I just didn't like them at first.

    I guess this is one of those books that just takes time to grow on you.

    This is the last Harry Potter book in which Harry is a child. Before his life - and this series - was visited by the spectre of death. I'm not talking about the long-ago deaths of James and Lily, of course Harry has experienced deaths before, but it was distant. I'm talking about the future deaths where Harry lost people he actually remembered, and respected, and loved. That's what I mean when I say that this is the last book in which Harry is a child, because as hard as his life was until now, he still had his innocence.

    Children believe that their heroes are unerring. One of the rites of passage to adulthood is the realization that heroes fall, like everyone else.

    I know that everyone loves Sirius, but for some reason, he didn't click for me when I was 14. This time around, I could understand his character more. I could relate to his desperation, his frustration, and the hope that kept him alive all those excruciating years in Azkaban.

    I think for me, it took maturity and the experience of loss and frustration, well, life itself, in order to appreciate the hardship that Harry and Sirius and Remus went through.

    Previously, this was a magical Cinderella-like tale about a boy in a room under the stairs. With this book, the story became twisted, and it became something more.

    Read this review and more @

  • Navessa
    Mar 13, 2013
  • Wil Wheaton
    Jul 05, 2014

    I'm beginning to wonder if there will ever be a Defence Against The Dark Arts teacher who is just a teacher.

  • Mikee Andrea (ReadWithMikee)
    Oct 01, 2015

    OKAY. This book was fantastic! I can't get over how everything just fell into place perfectly. Prisoner of Azkaban is my favorite of the series so far which is actually a surprise since Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was my least favorite movie growing up.

    But reading and watching the movie truly is a different experience. Even though I've seen the movies repeatedly year after year, I was still on my toes while I was turning the pages of my book. It was like I was seeing all of this for

    OKAY. This book was fantastic! I can't get over how everything just fell into place perfectly. Prisoner of Azkaban is my favorite of the series so far which is actually a surprise since Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was my least favorite movie growing up.

    But reading and watching the movie truly is a different experience. Even though I've seen the movies repeatedly year after year, I was still on my toes while I was turning the pages of my book. It was like I was seeing all of this for the first time!

    I've really developed a deeper love, respect, and understanding for this series and the Wizarding world. I especially loved the fact that we actually got to learn about Remus Lupin and his backstory as a werewolf. I never would've learned any of this if I never decided to pick up these books.

    This series just gets better and better, and darker and darker. I can slowly see how Harry Potter is moving away from middle grade and into young adult. I'm really looking forward to how that shift becomes more prominent in the later books. Now next up is Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, which is my favorite movie of the series growing up! Let's see how this one will go!

  • Brina
    Feb 21, 2016

    Harry Potter for me is like warm apple pie and vanilla ice cream. It is the ultimate comfort read. This must have been at least the 10th time I've read it but I have lost track. The theme I can take out of this particular book especially after reading it all these times is hope. Harry largely naive for most of the first three books, meets Sirius for the first time and his world changes. For ever so briefly he thinks he can leave the Dursleys for good and live entirely in the wizarding world. Of

    Harry Potter for me is like warm apple pie and vanilla ice cream. It is the ultimate comfort read. This must have been at least the 10th time I've read it but I have lost track. The theme I can take out of this particular book especially after reading it all these times is hope. Harry largely naive for most of the first three books, meets Sirius for the first time and his world changes. For ever so briefly he thinks he can leave the Dursleys for good and live entirely in the wizarding world. Of course, we know what happens next ;). The last 100 pages of this book for me are my favorite 100 pages of the series aside maybe from the end of Deathly Hallows, especially because (in my opinion) I feel the movie most closely resembles the book. This is usually the time of year when I reread the septology, and I am looking forward to feeling magical again as though it's my first time reading these books. Like that slice of warm apple pie, I am comforted knowing that for a few hours I can enter Harry's world.