The Moosewood Cookbook: Recipes from Moosewood Restaurant, Ithaca, New York

The Moosewood Cookbook: Recipes from Moosewood Restaurant, Ithaca, New York

Among the most influential cookbooks of our time, the Moosewood Cookbook is such a powerful symbol that the publishers were tempted not to tamper with it. But times have changed, and knowledge about the foods we eat and their nutritional value has increased. So, after many inquiries and requests, the author has revised many of her recipes to be lighter and healthier. Illus...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Moosewood Cookbook: Recipes from Moosewood Restaurant, Ithaca, New York
Author:Mollie Katzen
Rating:
ISBN:0913668680
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Paperback
Number of Pages:221 pages

The Moosewood Cookbook: Recipes from Moosewood Restaurant, Ithaca, New York Reviews

  • Chris
    Apr 10, 2007

    The first cookbook I ever owned. Actually, I stole it from my mom when I went to college, and the recipies are annotated with her notes from when I was a little kid. I love the dated aspects of the writing, like when Katzen explains what tofu is and how its hard to find, or when she introduces you to this exotic, wonderful dip called hummus. Classic, hearty veggie cooking, this is before TVP or Morning Star, back when being a vegetarian meant eating vegetables. I've used this less as I've aquire

    The first cookbook I ever owned. Actually, I stole it from my mom when I went to college, and the recipies are annotated with her notes from when I was a little kid. I love the dated aspects of the writing, like when Katzen explains what tofu is and how its hard to find, or when she introduces you to this exotic, wonderful dip called hummus. Classic, hearty veggie cooking, this is before TVP or Morning Star, back when being a vegetarian meant eating vegetables. I've used this less as I've aquired more cookbooks, but I always come back to it. I prefer this classic, older edition - the newer one is just wrong. Moosewood is NOT supposed to have color-photographs, its just not.

  • Leslie
    Jul 03, 2007

    To appreciate this cookbook, which is famous for being hand-lettered and illustrated by the author and covers both the fundamentals and specifics for cooking hearty, earth-crunchy, mostly vegetarian dishes, you have to acknowledge that it is very much a product of its times. Meaning that when it was published (the 1970's), you were pretty groundbreaking if you even knew what samosas and guacamole were, and vegetarianism was still fringe and undefined enough that this book, and the Moosewood rest

    To appreciate this cookbook, which is famous for being hand-lettered and illustrated by the author and covers both the fundamentals and specifics for cooking hearty, earth-crunchy, mostly vegetarian dishes, you have to acknowledge that it is very much a product of its times. Meaning that when it was published (the 1970's), you were pretty groundbreaking if you even knew what samosas and guacamole were, and vegetarianism was still fringe and undefined enough that this book, and the Moosewood restaurant itself, probably had to be flexible enough to serve the needs of vegans, vegetarians, pesco-ovo-vegetarians, "I'm a vegetarian but I eat chicken" vegetarians and meat eaters all at the same time!

    As often happens with me and cookbooks, I started using the Moosewood after moving into a group apartment where it was already sitting in the kitchen. When I reported this to my sister, she responded with complaints - she and her friends had tried the cookbook and were annoyed with its approximation of Asian foods that they knew how to cook better. So I went into things with open eyes, deciding to look at the book as a representation of the food of not many different cultures from which it borrowed recipes, but of a particular American culture and time: the brown rice, beans-and-sprouts hippie culture which we so easily poke fun at now but which was responsible for so much of the diversified eating options we now take for granted, from the availability of yogurt and cottage cheese in normal supermarkets to the return of cooking with the seasons.

    Later, as so often also happens with me and cookbooks, the Moosewood cookbook and I parted ways when the roommate who owned it ([

    ]) moved away. I forgot to buy a new copy, and then moved to Germany, where I'm guessing it's not so easy to come by. But then again, here it is easy to eat whole grains and lots of veggies. So I thank the Moosewood Cookbook for preparing me, and I will keep cooking the many recipes I just internalized along the way.

    Roasted beet salad, anyone?

  • Emily
    Oct 18, 2007

    This cookbook is not without its flaws -- the "ethnic" dishes are frequently repulsive -- but there's some really good, hearty earnest-white-person food up in here. The hummus, pasta sauce, Brazilian black bean soup, refritos, and lasagna recipes are absolute staples.

  • Allison
    Dec 22, 2007

    My mom's copy has been taped back together, set on fire, and covered in too many ingredients to list. That adds to the appeal for me because I know it is something that she has cherished. When I became a vegetarian I thought "oh yes now Moosewood is mine." Then I realized that probably 350ish days out of the year I don't have time to be a bloody gourmet chef, you know?

    This doesn't diminish my love for the cookbook. It does mean that I can't really move past loving anything but the aesthetics bec

    My mom's copy has been taped back together, set on fire, and covered in too many ingredients to list. That adds to the appeal for me because I know it is something that she has cherished. When I became a vegetarian I thought "oh yes now Moosewood is mine." Then I realized that probably 350ish days out of the year I don't have time to be a bloody gourmet chef, you know?

    This doesn't diminish my love for the cookbook. It does mean that I can't really move past loving anything but the aesthetics because I have never really had time to explore the culinary value of the dishes inside. Maybe someday. I haven't lost hope.

  • Sarah
    Apr 18, 2009

    I suppose I opened this book with expectations that were too high. Everything I had ever heard about Mollie Katzen and her cookbooks gave the highest praise. I have relied on a few non-Katzen Moosewood cookbooks (Moosewood Sundays, Moosewood New Classics) myself over the past few years; in fact, I wouldn't want to live without them. So I opened the book prepared to be blown away. I wasn't. The hand-lettering

    charming; I felt like I was reading a friend's recipes. However, I felt like I was re

    I suppose I opened this book with expectations that were too high. Everything I had ever heard about Mollie Katzen and her cookbooks gave the highest praise. I have relied on a few non-Katzen Moosewood cookbooks (Moosewood Sundays, Moosewood New Classics) myself over the past few years; in fact, I wouldn't want to live without them. So I opened the book prepared to be blown away. I wasn't. The hand-lettering

    charming; I felt like I was reading a friend's recipes. However, I felt like I was reading a friend's recipes. They seemed to me very reminiscent of the cuisine with which I grew up, minus the meat. She uses tofu and meat-substitutes to approximate what is normally prepared with dairy, eggs, and meat, instead of creating fresh, beautiful recipes based on vegetables and grains. Katzen's recipes also seemed a bit too imprecise and safe to me. For instance, there are a few recipes titled "spicy." I assume she means "contains spices," or "spiced," rather than "spicy," because I don't recall a hot pepper in the book. Many of the recipes were things I already make in my own way, and her methods frequently seemed a little irrational.

    However, I give this book 3 stars, because as everyone knows, it was groundbreaking for its time. It is the reason we have better vegetarian cookbooks today. It is the reason I can pick up Moosewood Sundays or Moosewood New Classics from my shelf and make beautiful, fresh, vegetarian food. It was also meant for a different audience. It was meant for people who only knew meat and potatoes cooking; it was meant for people who didn't already know how to prepare basic greens or salads; for people who looked at tofu like it was an alien substance, and asked tempeh...what? If you're one of those people, please, read this book!

    If you know the basics of vegetarian cooking, I wouldn't bother. I did mark some recipes in this book to copy, and some of the tofu-in-place-of-eggs recipes were new to me. However, I'm taking this back to the library and won't be sad to see it go.

  • Jensownzoo
    May 07, 2009

    This is a vegetarian classic and for good reason. The recipes are flavorful, varied, and just plain

    . Like the Enchanted Broccoli Forest, this cookbook is hand-written and illustrated, making it an exceptionally charming. Sample recipe below:

    Mushroom Curry

    4 tbsp butter

    2 cloves minced garlic

    1 c chopped celery

    1 1/2 lb. chopped mushrooms

    1 tsp ground cumin

    1 tsp cinnamon

    1 tsp turmeric

    1 tsp powdered ginger

    1/2 tsp dry mustard

    1/2 tsp ground cloves

    3 tbsp shredded, unsweetened coconut

    1 tbsp honey

    juice

    This is a vegetarian classic and for good reason. The recipes are flavorful, varied, and just plain

    . Like the Enchanted Broccoli Forest, this cookbook is hand-written and illustrated, making it an exceptionally charming. Sample recipe below:

    Mushroom Curry

    4 tbsp butter

    2 cloves minced garlic

    1 c chopped celery

    1 1/2 lb. chopped mushrooms

    1 tsp ground cumin

    1 tsp cinnamon

    1 tsp turmeric

    1 tsp powdered ginger

    1/2 tsp dry mustard

    1/2 tsp ground cloves

    3 tbsp shredded, unsweetened coconut

    1 tbsp honey

    juice from 1 lemon

    3 lg tomatoes

    2 lg cooking apples

    1 1/2 tsp salt (or more, to taste)

    lots of ground black pepper

    water to steam (about 3/4 cup)

    1 c sliced almonds

    2 tbsp sweet butter

    1. In a large skillet, begin cooking onions and garlic in butter. After a few minutes, add salt and spices. When onions are soft, add celery and mushrooms. You may want to add about 1/2 cup water at this point to prevent sticking (and to make a nice broth). Mix well, cover, and simmer about 5-8 minutes (low heat).

    2. When celery is slightly tender, add apples and tomatoes (both in 1 1/2" slices) and coconut. Mix and continue cooking until everything is just tender, not too mushy. (Additional water might be needed) Turn off heat. Add honey and lemon juice; mix and let sit, covered.

    3. Saute almonds in sweet butter for the topping.

    4. Serve curry over rice with sauteed almonds on top.

    4-6 servings

  • Deb
    Mar 12, 2011

    I have not cooked from this old favorite for quite a while but pulled it out to make the Hungarian Mushroom Soup this week and remembered just how much I love Mollie Katzen. A classic.

    Link to a pretty wonderful bowl of soup:

  • Catherine Woodman
    Jul 29, 2011

    While there are many flaws in this cookbook by 21st century standards, it was a miracle in the mid-70's. I went to college n 1977 and this book changed my eating life forever--so while it lacks alot in the way of spicing complexity that would seem altogether common today, it had vegetarian recipes that were easy to follow, and they worked. it is whimsical and wonderful. It had things from my childhood that I could never give up (like quiche and sour cream coffeecake) and things I would never hav

    While there are many flaws in this cookbook by 21st century standards, it was a miracle in the mid-70's. I went to college n 1977 and this book changed my eating life forever--so while it lacks alot in the way of spicing complexity that would seem altogether common today, it had vegetarian recipes that were easy to follow, and they worked. it is whimsical and wonderful. It had things from my childhood that I could never give up (like quiche and sour cream coffeecake) and things I would never have tried if they hadn't been in here. It is a book that literally changed my life, and while I have over 500 cookbooks, the Moosewood series remains amongst my most used and most valued cookbooks--not to mention how much I loved the restaurant when I was in Ithaca, the summer after my junior year of high school. It is a piece of cooking history, right up there with The Joy of Cooking.

  • Barbara
    Jul 04, 2016

    Classic, delicious vegetarian recipes, although some are dated because it was published decades ago.

  • Gerry
    Jan 31, 2017

    I am not usually a cookbook reader but this one fitted into my collection of miniature books so I decided to give it a go. Not that I am ever likely to produce any of the dishes within its covers for I am not a gourmet chef, just one who likes the easy option and cooks simple things to eat that do not need a lot of preparation!

    Before we get to the recipes, Mollie Katzen gives us an enlightening preface in which she tells us that in the early 1970s she went to visit her brother in New York when h

    I am not usually a cookbook reader but this one fitted into my collection of miniature books so I decided to give it a go. Not that I am ever likely to produce any of the dishes within its covers for I am not a gourmet chef, just one who likes the easy option and cooks simple things to eat that do not need a lot of preparation!

    Before we get to the recipes, Mollie Katzen gives us an enlightening preface in which she tells us that in the early 1970s she went to visit her brother in New York when he was about to start a restaurant. She ended up staying and helping to launch the business, which was named 'Moosewood', after a local variety of maple tree.

    Mollie stayed for five years and during that time she kept a journal of the dishes they prepared in their ever evolving vegetarian kitchen. Eventually she produced a small edition of 800 copies of the first 'Moosewood Cookbook'. It sold out in a few weeks and a second edition of 2,000 copies did similarly. Twenty years and nearly two million copies later comes the miniature edition 'Moosewood Cookbook Classics' that gives a selection of Mollie's wholesome, healthy food.

    Mollie treats us to the whole gamut of dishes beginning with soups and working her way through salads, sauces and dips, entrées and finally desserts; all recipes are complete with preparation time and it is all followed by some useful pantry notes.

    Split Pea Soup sounds interesting and it reminds me of when I was a boy and I used to have the job of removing the peas from their pods prior to cooking and I used to eat plenty of them along the way, or if one prefers there is Gypsy Soup, 'a delicately spiced Spanish-style vegetable soup'. But I must confess I don't think I want to try Chilled Cucumber-Yogurt Soup!

    Similarly I would not want to taste Warm Salad but Macedonian Salad sounds okay, 'small cubes of toasted eggplant, marinated with fresh vegetables in a lemony herby vinaigrette'. And on to the sauces and dips (I am not particularly a fan) but one could choose from Eggplant Scallopini Marsala, Salsa Fresca , Tomato Salsa or, probably my favourite Zingy Bean Dip.

    Entrées include Broccoli Mushroom Noodle Casserole (not for me, I suspect) Tart & Tangy Baked Beans (that sounds more like it - you are beginning to get my tastes) or even Zucchini-Feta Pancakes, 'light and very satisfying (also quite attractive with lovely flecks of green)' - whatever they may be! And while Vegetable Stew sounds up my street, Eggplant Curry certainly does not (I am most definitely not a curry eater!).

    And then my favourite section of the book, desserts; I could probably have a try at each of them. Maple-Walnut Pie, Moosewood Fudge Brownies, 'on a brownie-intensity scale of 1 to 10, these are about an 11', and then the simple but attractive and very yummy Lemon Mousse.

    I do indulge in vegetarian meals now and again for not only am I not a regular meat eater but my daughter is a vegetarian so when we are together that is the order of the day. I might just show her 'Moosewood Cookbook Classics' to see what she wants to conjure up - but I must say I will be pointing out dishes that I will not be eating!