Catching Fire

Catching Fire

Sparks are igniting.Flames are spreading.And the Capitol wants revenge.Against all odds, Katniss has won the Hunger Games. She and fellow District 12 tribute Peeta Mellark are miraculously still alive. Katniss should be relieved, happy even. After all, she has returned to her family and her longtime friend, Gale. Yet nothing is the way Katniss wishes it to be. Gale holds h...

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Title:Catching Fire
Author:Suzanne Collins
Rating:
ISBN:0439023491
Edition Language:English
Format Type:Hardcover
Number of Pages:391 pages

Catching Fire Reviews

  • Sparrow
    Feb 06, 2009

    I went to see

    a couple of times this past month, and there is that scene where Eli Roth and Omar Doom are in the theater, and they dress themselves up to look like waiters and then whip around the corner and kill the two Nazi guards to some funny Ennio Morriconi(ish?), spaghetti-western sounding music. And everybody in the theater laughs, and then the film cuts to Hitler laughing, watching a movie of a Nazi soldier killing Americans. It’s one of those great story-telling mom

    I went to see

    a couple of times this past month, and there is that scene where Eli Roth and Omar Doom are in the theater, and they dress themselves up to look like waiters and then whip around the corner and kill the two Nazi guards to some funny Ennio Morriconi(ish?), spaghetti-western sounding music. And everybody in the theater laughs, and then the film cuts to Hitler laughing, watching a movie of a Nazi soldier killing Americans. It’s one of those great story-telling moments where I’m nice and comfortable and morally superior, until I realize that actually I’m exactly the same as someone I think is Evil. There was a moment when I first saw

    that was like that, and I was depressed for a month after I read

    because of the same type of experience. I don’t know where you get that brand of story-telling ability, but

    has it coming out of her ears, in the sort of young adult variety.

    was maybe not as striking as the first book in this series,

    , in making me disturbed about myself, but it definitely had its moments. Also, I was in my second week of law school and had just gotten back from an exhausting wedding when I read it, so I might not have had the capacity to self-reflect that I normally do. If you don’t know already, even though you should know, the premise of this series is a that in the future, post-apocalyptic world of the super-badass Katniss Everdeen, one rich city controls twelve poor-to-starving cities that produce all of the goods for the rich city. In order to keep the poor cities in fear, the rich city requires each of the poor cities to send one teenage boy and one teenage girl as tributes to play the Hunger Games. In the Hunger Games the kids have to kill each other until there is one survivor, who gets to party for the rest of his/her life but never really feels like partying because everything’s so fucked up. Usually they go crazy, if they didn’t start out that way. It’s very

    , and yes it is the same premise as

    , but not as determinedly nasty as those two books. Also, girl action hero!

    Anyway, a couple of days after I finished this book, I was spacing off instead of briefing cases, and I started thinking about the description of the capital city that controls the other cities. There is a part where Katniss and another character have to go to a party at the capital, and there are as many amazing foods as they can imagine. It’s a big party, and they’re celebrities, and everyone loves them. They have one bite of every kind of food, so that they can taste everything, but unfortunately they get full. One of their entourage explains to them that there are puke closets, so that everyone can keep eating for the whole night, and our two characters suddenly step back from the party and remember their families and neighbors, who are starving while the capital lives in decadence. I was thinking about that and how the shallow people in the capital city were just as culpable for the evil in their society as the military that imposed starvation on the cities, and then, suddenly, I realized, duh, she’s talking about me. This story is really about the

    , and (passive, consumption-driven U.S. citizen that I am) I’m not the hero.

    So, that’s about three times this month that I’ve been on the side of terrorists. I don’t know whether that means story-tellers are gettin’ pretty tricky, or if it just means I think there’s a problem with the way stuff is. Or that, like, I’m becoming a rager, or something. (FBI, if you’re reading this, JK about this whole paragraph. LOL!)

    When I was working my 8-5 job last year, I started listening to some iTunesU classes while I was doing my work so that my brain wouldn’t die. One of them was given by Carolyn Marvin at Stanford, and it was called “True Colors: Myth, Magic, and the American Flag.” The premise, to summarize very briefly, was that for any culture to stay together, the culture requires a blood sacrifice.

    goes into more detail about nationalism and blood sacrifice. She really convincingly pointed out how, civilized though we think we are, blood sacrifice in modern Western culture is not really significantly different than tribal human sacrifices. It’s a seriously creepy theory, but I’m not kidding when I say that she’s right. Really, listen to the lecture. So, I’ve spent a lot of time in the past couple of weeks doing a mental compare/contrast of the U.S. with this futuristic dystopia. We don’t come off looking too good, guys.

    Obviously these are really complicated topics, but nothing seems as simple as “violence is not the answer” or, on the other side of the argument, “destroy civilization.” I’m not positive what the right answer is, but I’d like to find out. I think Suzanne Collins’s books should be taught in high school social studies classes, so maybe we could get some young brains working on this problem. How do we effectively refuse to benefit from universally destructive and dehumanizing trade practices, but still live healthy and productive lives?

    So, go read everything Suzanne Collins ever wrote (including the episodes of

    because that show is awesome) and reflect on international trade and the global economy. I don’t know if you’ll be a better person for it, but I think so. Maybe after you do all that reading you can help me figure out some way for us not to be Evil.

  • Heather
    Mar 27, 2009

    Catching Fire was one of my most anticipated books of 2009. I loved it's predecessor, The Hunger Games and was so hopeful for this intstallment. I wasn't disappointed per se, but it did fail to meet my expectations. Here's a few reasons why...

    I don't know what it is with authors and their recent need to load up their books with a hundred or so pages of filler, but I really wish they would cut it out. There is lieterally about a hundred and some odd pages of this book that should have died on the

    Catching Fire was one of my most anticipated books of 2009. I loved it's predecessor, The Hunger Games and was so hopeful for this intstallment. I wasn't disappointed per se, but it did fail to meet my expectations. Here's a few reasons why...

    I don't know what it is with authors and their recent need to load up their books with a hundred or so pages of filler, but I really wish they would cut it out. There is lieterally about a hundred and some odd pages of this book that should have died on the editing room floor. The 9 months that Katniss spends in District 12 only serves to let us know that uprisings are occuring and she has been targeted by The Captial, all of which could have been summed up in a chapter or two.

    Second, I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that about 90% of those of us who read and loved Hunger Games were team Peeta all the way. Though we knew Gale would be an issue, we were hoping Katniss would "wake up" and realize what a worthy, fine specimen she has in Peeta, well, it doesn't happen that way, and to say I'm bummed is an understatement. I'm kinda pissed.

    Katniss doesn't grow in this book at all. She is still a brash reacter, instead of a logicl thinker. I didn't mind it so much in the first book, because who wouldn't be, but the Hunger Games taught her nothing it seems, in either the way she responds to situations or in reference to how she really feels about the people in her life.

    Next, I get that Peeta was never much of a badass, but was it really necessary to injure him 10 seconds into the games? That irked me like nothing else. In hindsight, Peeta is one of the strongest characters, menatlly, if nothing else, and yet Collins reduced him to an invalid so that Katniss could rise up to the challenge. Please. It only made me roll my eyes and steam over the fact that I was going to have to read Hunger Games part duex, which wouldn't have been bad except for the fact that I was expecting something more.

    Which leads me to my last complaint, the games. Though I could see everything in this book coming, I thought it was rather brilliant to send them back to the games. What wasn't brilliant however, was the games themselves. They started out well enough, but after the crazy fog and freaky monkeys, Collins sort of lost me. Who cares if there is death traps all over the place if you know how to predict it and can avoid it? Not scary.

    Basically, this booked lacked the magic of the first, and failed to wow with new material as nothing new really happens. Yeah we learn a little more, and the last few pages shake things up a bit, but I shouldn't have to wait until I've read to the end to finally learn something interesting. There were moments where I would catch a glimpse of what made me love Hunger Games, and for that I give this book three stars. But I can't in good conscious give it more for it lacked character development and basically just served as a pit stop between books one and three. Hopefully the third will be better.

  • Cara
    Jun 07, 2009

    This is most possibly the

    (or best depending what you go on) cliffhanger I have encountered in all my reading days. It leaves you more than just hanging, you are grasping for your life on a thread that is fraying and there is nothing to do but hold on (well metaphorically of course).

    One word that can sum up this book is

    . Everything is just felt more. The compassion, threats, action, betrayal, gestures, words all of it. This has to be the reason why it is so addictive. As expec

    This is most possibly the

    (or best depending what you go on) cliffhanger I have encountered in all my reading days. It leaves you more than just hanging, you are grasping for your life on a thread that is fraying and there is nothing to do but hold on (well metaphorically of course).

    One word that can sum up this book is

    . Everything is just felt more. The compassion, threats, action, betrayal, gestures, words all of it. This has to be the reason why it is so addictive. As expected from this series we are in for a ride. Some things are hinted out, but the full affect of what is going on isn't totally revealed till the very end. Though I felt frustrated at times this is a grand slam of a sequel.

    You know it's hard to hate Katniss for being the object of the whole love triangle. I usually get annoyed to no end and can't help wonder what people see in the person, but Katniss is different. Though you don't think that Katniss is particularly more special than others, but that is part of what you admire about her. Plus she is critical of herself so you don't necessarily get a good feel of what people think about her other than what is said with dialogue. I totally love this because frankly that is what it's like in real life. It's others that can show you who you really are when you aren't able to do it yourself. Peeta and Gale are both incredible guys and what makes them so great is that they both are good

    , something that is lacking in other books at times. Don't get me wrong there is a lot more to the series than the love triangle.

    gives us a lot to mull over till her much anticipated final climatic book

    .

    BTW Excellent Excellent covers!!!

    For those of you who didn't know there is a movie coming out for the first book

    !

    is the link to the trailer. Now just to wait for the second movie trailer...and the second trailer has arrived! Click

    to view it. I got the chills guys.

  • Emily
    Jun 08, 2009

    I think I wouldn't be feeling quite so disappointed by this book if The Hunger Games hadn't been quite so close to perfect. But there it is. Must be hard to compete with yourself when you set the bar so high.

    Where The Hunger Games is a tightly-plotted, fast-paced dystopian thriller heaped with romance and horror, this book is... well, a lot of the same. A WHOLE lot of the same plot. Redundantly similar at points, only slower moving and far less polished. Too much of the story is told rather tha

    I think I wouldn't be feeling quite so disappointed by this book if The Hunger Games hadn't been quite so close to perfect. But there it is. Must be hard to compete with yourself when you set the bar so high.

    Where The Hunger Games is a tightly-plotted, fast-paced dystopian thriller heaped with romance and horror, this book is... well, a lot of the same. A WHOLE lot of the same plot. Redundantly similar at points, only slower moving and far less polished. Too much of the story is told rather than shown -- whole months can go by in just a few pages -- and yet the real action gets rolling about two thirds of the way through the book. There were times when the story actually seemed to PLOD.

    That said, this is an ARC and things could change. Here's hoping this one sees some revision before its publication this fall. Collins is obviously capable of great things. And all complaints aside, this is a very compelling read. Fantastic characters, and the setup is definitely there for an interesting conclusion. I can't wait to find out what happens next.

    THAT said, marks off for deus ex machina abuse.

  • Ash
    Jun 12, 2009

    Oh, snap. She DID NOT just do that. This is not a cliffhanger people, this is inhumane. Like hanging on for dear life by a spider web thin thread totally butt naked (you know that makes it worse)! It's so worth it though.

    Quick overview: Catching Fire starts up not far from where The Hunger Games ended. Katniss is living in the Victors Village with her family. You'd think she could finally be able to relax and live the cushy life. Well that wouldn't make a good book. There are rumors of rebelli

    Oh, snap. She DID NOT just do that. This is not a cliffhanger people, this is inhumane. Like hanging on for dear life by a spider web thin thread totally butt naked (you know that makes it worse)! It's so worth it though.

    Quick overview: Catching Fire starts up not far from where The Hunger Games ended. Katniss is living in the Victors Village with her family. You'd think she could finally be able to relax and live the cushy life. Well that wouldn't make a good book. There are rumors of rebellion and since Katniss and Peeta won the Hunger Games in defiance they have become the faces of that rebellion. The Capitol, particularly President Snow, is not happy with them. Now Katniss has to worry about looking as in love with Peeta as possible to quiet down the rebellion, but is that what she really wants?

    It’s really hard to summarize a book when you’re afraid that everything you say will give away the twist. If you have not read the book DON’T read a whole bunch of reviews or comments! You’ll figure stuff out! Figuring out what’s going on and the twists is part of what makes this so good. You think you’ve got everything and everyone pegged only to find out that you only got half (if any) of it right.

    I wasn’t sure what the second book was going to be about but now looking back I think “Of course! How else would it have worked?” The book starts off a little slow, but it’s important for what Collins is trying to set up. I love Katniss and I hate her. She frustrates me beyond belief, but you have to love her. I love how you see and know everything from Katniss's point of view. You’re just as confused and unsure as she is. It never feels like she’s not a real person. You feel just as scared for her family. You feel her confusion and doubt. You just really feel. I could probably name off a bunch of things that bothered me about the book (I think I mentioned how I HAAAATE love triangles with a burning passion) but you really care about the characters. You can't even hate Katniss's team of stylists, who are selfish Capitol dwellers. The book deals with so much more than who she’s going to end up with.

    At first I really didn’t want to read it because I know how I am with these books. I get totally immersed, constantly trying to figure it all out. I can’t believe the twists in this book! The ending is just so…epic! How everything just falls into place and makes sense. You see the characters in a whole new light. And then you’re left with the whole butt-naked-spider-thread thing. I’m pretty sure it’s not good for my health, but they say the same thing about oreos and fried chicken.

    So what do you read after a book like this? Well, you could look for a book that’s just as addictive and gripping as this (Yeah, good luck with that), or read a book about kittens chasing after butterflies in a open meadow. Then you’ll probably start thinking that there is a secret underground society of kitties just waiting for the right moment to emerge, and you find out that the butterflies are their spies! You see, this is the type of thinking you have after reading the book. It’s beyond epic. Until the third book finally comes out I’ll be hanging butt naked by a spider thin thread.

  • Sophie
    Jul 15, 2009

    I can't review this without being spoilery, so...

    1. AAAAAAAAAAAAAH

    2. The one thing I didn't like about this book is the part where Katniss finds out she has to go back to the Hunger Games. I think there should have been more of a pause there--for disbelief, for Katniss maybe trying to think of ways out of it, ways to kill herself even. The book started moving at a really fast pace after that point, with Katniss and Peeta preparing for the next Games, and I was like "wait, what? hang on a minute!

    I can't review this without being spoilery, so...

    1. AAAAAAAAAAAAAH

    2. The one thing I didn't like about this book is the part where Katniss finds out she has to go back to the Hunger Games. I think there should have been more of a pause there--for disbelief, for Katniss maybe trying to think of ways out of it, ways to kill herself even. The book started moving at a really fast pace after that point, with Katniss and Peeta preparing for the next Games, and I was like "wait, what? hang on a minute!" It was hard for me to believe that Katniss would willingly go back to the arena, at least not without major depression. One night of drinking didn't seem to cover it.

    3. Everything else = awesome. The

    imagery. The clock arena. The rebellion. President Snow being creepy as fuck. HIS BREATH SMELLS LIKE BLOOOOOOD!

    4. As soon as Wiress and Beetee started talking about the chink in the force field's armor, I knew the answer to the Games was BRING DOWN THE FORCE FIELD. I was yelling and yelling at them to do it, and then finally they did, and I was like "YES!"

    5. I find the love triangle a little annoying but mostly interesting. Katniss doesn't really know how she feels about either of them, because she doesn't have the freedom to feel on her own terms. I like that she has some makeout time on the beach with Peeta, though.

    6. This series is reminding me more and more of

    's

    series. The evil oppressive government, the secret rebellion, the possibly-mythical place for them to escape to (The Smoke/District 13), hovercrafts, face tattoos, genetically modified plants/animals. I was hoping it'd go that way when I first read

    . I was like, this government needs to be

    , Tally Youngblood-style.

    7. "This is why we don't let you make plans." HA!

    8. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!!! WHEN IS BOOK THREE COMING OUT!!!!!!!

  • Lyndsey
    Aug 30, 2010

    ...

    Well,

    . No plot spoilers, just image spoilers.

    Don't read on if you do not want to see

    .

    I am officially designating this review as my update central for casting on the Hunger Games. As new characters are cast, I will post the actor's pictures here along with the images I find that imitate how they

    look as the character they will be playing.

    The

    photoshopped pic I

    ...

    Well,

    . No plot spoilers, just image spoilers.

    Don't read on if you do not want to see

    .

    I am officially designating this review as my update central for casting on the Hunger Games. As new characters are cast, I will post the actor's pictures here along with the images I find that imitate how they

    look as the character they will be playing.

    The

    photoshopped pic I have seen of Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss:

    Okay, I just want to say that, while Josh is not what I had pictured, I trust those in charge. And Suzanne Collins gave her approval, so that in itself speaks volumes. Bottom-line is: Josh is workable. As long as they work with him to LOOK the part, and give him the eyes and most importantly the hair, I think he could be good.

    A little too pretty for my image of Gale. I also didn't picture Gale so beefy but instead trim and slim. Although for me, I was never too concerned with this role anyway. Gale never stood out to me as much as Peeta did in these books, so I would have been fine with nearly any choice. Once again, as long as they work their studio magic on his looks, he should do just fine.

    The guy is awesome. I think he will pull it off without effort.

    If you ask me - this guy is way hotter than I ever thought Crane would be. Gah. He's frikkin hotter than the guy playing Peeta!

    Excellent choice!

    Amandla Stenberg and Dayo Okeniyi. They are perfect, and I am already getting emotional thinking about that infamous scene with Rue... *sigh*

    As far as the other characters, the news isn't out quite yet. It seems they will be looking for Prim and Haymitch soon. So I will post more info here once the news is out.

    Let me know what you think of the re-imaginings of these actors in their new character roles!

  • mark monday
    Dec 05, 2011

    HIT POINTS: 25

    ALIGNMENT: Chaotic Good

    SYMBOL: Middle Finger

    STRENGTH: 15

    INTELLIGENCE: 10

    WISDOM: 5

    DEXTERITY: 20

    CONSTITUTION: 15

    CHARISMA: 25

    FIGHTER: 10th Level Archer

    ASSASSIN: 9th Level Assassin

    SPECIAL ATTACKS: Resentful Attitude

    SPECIAL DEFENSES: Defensive Attitude

    SUMMARY OF PLAYER SKILLS:

    despite the inherent restrictions of living in a YA novel, Katniss is a remarkably well-develope

    HIT POINTS: 25

    ALIGNMENT: Chaotic Good

    SYMBOL: Middle Finger

    STRENGTH: 15

    INTELLIGENCE: 10

    WISDOM: 5

    DEXTERITY: 20

    CONSTITUTION: 15

    CHARISMA: 25

    FIGHTER: 10th Level Archer

    ASSASSIN: 9th Level Assassin

    SPECIAL ATTACKS: Resentful Attitude

    SPECIAL DEFENSES: Defensive Attitude

    SUMMARY OF PLAYER SKILLS:

    despite the inherent restrictions of living in a YA novel, Katniss is a remarkably well-developed and complex character. although she's drawn from the familiar tough girl/outsider/square peg template, Collins resists softening her - her temper, her understandable but often misdirected suspiciousness, her frequent inability to empathize with others are never underplayed. her appearance at the end, where she appears to be slipping into depressive, semi-crazy, unreasoning mulishness, is very well-done and psychologically astute.

    i also love how her strengths are so nonchalantly illustrated - she is something special, but never a superwoman. her character's changes and growth and weaknesses and skills are carefully gradual and feel real - the reader is made to truly understand her, all of her. two sequences in Catching Fire particularly impressed me. the first one comes almost mid-way: Katniss' slow, painful revelation about the nature of oppression and the need for revolution, at one point moving from fear for her sister's safety and potential death if revolution occurs to understanding of her sister's life as a kind of living death already, if revolution does not occur. a great example of realistic character development that highlights Collins' sophisticated yet pleasingly transparent and straightforward writing style.

    _________________________

    HIT POINTS: 15

    ALIGNMENT: Chaotic Good

    SYMBOL: Pouty Scowl

    STRENGTH: 20

    INTELLIGENCE: 15

    WISDOM: 5

    DEXTERITY: 15

    CONSTITUTION: 10

    CHARISMA: 20

    FIGHTER: 9th Level Ranger

    SPECIAL ATTACKS: Che Guevera Eyes

    SPECIAL DEFENSES: Come Hither Eyes

    SUMMARY OF GAME STRUCTURE:

    i love how Gale’s appearances bookend the first two novels. it is an elegant way to illustrate this character’s importance to both Katniss and the narrative itself – Gale sees two different kinds of Katniss in each novel; his reactions to her are different as well, and despite his own somewhat static characterization, it is through Gale that the reader is able to truly mark Katniss’ changes in status and mind and spirit. even better, by saving him for the beginning and end, he gets put out of the way for the duration of most of each novel’s action. although Katniss wastes a rather inordinate amount of time obsessing over him for a good portion of both novels, once she’s in the arena, time spent mooning over her backwoods boyfriend is happily curtailed. i really like how Collins divides the time Katniss spends on each of her love interests; the romantic elements of the novel are as sharply structured as the novel itself, with its neat division into (1) the tour of districts and the burgeoning of revolution, (2) back home in District 12 and accepting the need for action (or, perhaps, flight), and (3) the game itself.

    just a few words for the game itself: AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME. the game that takes up much of the final third of the novel is my other favorite thing in Catching Fire. the tension and danger, the pacing, the confusion of who should trust who and what did that person mean when they said that, the puzzle of what is happening in each deadly and differentiated section, the clock-like structure of the arena, and the immense difference between this game and the game depicted in Hunger Games... awesome! almost as awesome: the interview with the contestants, Katniss & Peeta's new look, Cinna's rebellion. really, i could go on and on.

    _________________________

    HIT POINTS: 15

    ALIGNMENT: Lawful Good

    SYMBOL: Big Spoon

    STRENGTH: 15

    INTELLIGENCE: 20

    WISDOM: 15

    DEXTERITY: 5

    CONSTITUTION: 10

    CHARISMA: 20

    FIGHTER: 9th Level Bread Baker

    BARD: 10th Level Public Speaker

    SPECIAL ATTACKS: Debilitating Guilt-Trip

    SPECIAL DEFENSES: He Actually Loves You

    SUMMARY OF GAME PLATFORM:

    i don't know how popular the character of Peeta is, probably because i am far from being a young adult - but i think his characterization is another wonderful achievement. it is not such an easy task to make A Good Person and Voice of Your Conscience without turning that character into a two-dimensional

    . Collins is able to accomplish this with ease (and this is a character whose every other line is practically I Love You Katniss), in scenes where mawkish sentimentality and eye-rolling cliché are conspicuously, happily absent. her handling of Peeta's character is a hallmark of Collins' overall success. she writes of a dire world, one full of death and despair and undying love and family tragedy and trials & tribulations both romantic and violent. and she does it in way that is clean, polished, graceful, direct, and terrifically moving.

  • brian
    Apr 23, 2012

    i'm gonna dangle some bait here:

    is the sloppy follow-up to

    , which seems to have been written in the frenzied fever of the author's realization that she had a megahit on her hands. the pacing is way off, the plotting is mechanical, the characterization is lazy, and the 'game' section is just lame. and the big reaping twist at the mid-point? it just sits there. it just happens and we're rushed in, totally pushing aside anything genuinely interesting for the sake of plot

    i'm gonna dangle some bait here:

    is the sloppy follow-up to

    , which seems to have been written in the frenzied fever of the author's realization that she had a megahit on her hands. the pacing is way off, the plotting is mechanical, the characterization is lazy, and the 'game' section is just lame. and the big reaping twist at the mid-point? it just sits there. it just happens and we're rushed in, totally pushing aside anything genuinely interesting for the sake of plot! plot! plot!

    it's actually kind of a shame b/c collins is terrific at coming up with story & plot elements, she's just kinda inept at assembling and executing 'em. yeah, i'm in the minority in this opinion... but i'm right.

    aight.

    chum in the water for my favorite type of goodreaders.

    y'know who i'm talking about: those weirdos (if you're over the age of 17, i wonder...

    ) who love some wildly popular book and get all bent out of shape if someone - anyone! - disagrees with 'em, and shits semi-coherent & badly-worded snark all over the place. they've gotta be the same people who also cram political sites full of this kinda shit:

    don't ya think?

    well, (as if you didn't see this coming), on to book 3.

  • Khanh (the Grinch)
    Nov 24, 2015

    Binge reading? Me? Nah...

    >_>

    Ok, so to refresh the memory of recent events, I watched the final Hunger Games Saturday without a clue who the fuck any of those people are. I read Hunger Games #1 yesterday, and loved it. Now onto book 2.

    Loved it too, is it any surprise? It's awesome! I actually know more and more people from the movie now!

    So now that I've expressed my love for the book, allow me to rant.

    . Not all of it, of course, but Peeta, in particular. I'm sure Hutchers

    Binge reading? Me? Nah...

    >_>

    Ok, so to refresh the memory of recent events, I watched the final Hunger Games Saturday without a clue who the fuck any of those people are. I read Hunger Games #1 yesterday, and loved it. Now onto book 2.

    Loved it too, is it any surprise? It's awesome! I actually know more and more people from the movie now!

    So now that I've expressed my love for the book, allow me to rant.

    . Not all of it, of course, but Peeta, in particular. I'm sure Hutcherson is a fine actor. He's decent looking, that's not the point. The point is

    I loved Peeta in the first book, my love for him continued in the second. He's just so

    . So pure, so nice. Self-sacrificial and genuinely well-meaning without being a martyr, and the on-screen portrayal of him ISN'T HOW I PICTURED HIM AT ALL. ARRRRRRGGGGGGGG!!!!!!!!!

    /endrant

    Let's talk about the love triangle. If you guys know me, you will know that I absolutely

    99.9% of the time, they're useless. They add nothing to the plot, and they're only a device used to portrayl how ULTRA FUCKING SPESHUL AND BEAUTIFUL AND PERFECT AND DESIRABLE THE MARY SUE MC IS.

    If a book has to have a love triangle, this is how it should be done. Gale is her long-time friend, almost a brother, for whom she naturally develops genuine feelings for. Their relationship is based on mutual respect; they take care of each other. They don't underestimate one another.

    Peeta is a tool. I don't say that in a bad way, like

    . I mean that he is a tool for Katniss' survival. Their "love" for one another ensured their survival in the Games. Despite Peeta's long-time crush on Katniss, she doesn't return his feelings, and in fact, held him at arm's length, under deep suspicion until he proves himself.

    So yes, I approve of this motherfucking love triangle. And I more than approve of this book.